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Trust Ports

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many applications there were for trust port status in each of the last 10 years; and what the status is of each application. [124297]

Dr. Ladyman: Since 1998 the Department has received one application for trust port status, currently being considered, from Exeter city council.

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list the trust ports in the United Kingdom; and when the last such port was established. [124298]

Dr. Ladyman: A list of trust ports in the UK is contained in our publication “Focus on Ports” a copy of which is on the Department’s website at: http://
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www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/maritime/focusonports/focusonports2006a?version=1 and is being placed in the Library of the House. No trust port has been established in the past 10 years. To obtain information on the most recent trust port to be established would involve disproportionate cost.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Animal Welfare: Birds of Prey

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he plans to extend the duty of care towards an animal for which a person is responsible under section 9 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 to birds of prey used in fox hunting; and if he will make a statement. [124146]

Barry Gardiner: Under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, the duty to ensure welfare applies to all vertebrate animals for which someone is responsible.

Those intending to use birds of prey for fox hunting must first assess whether the welfare of the bird is likely to be compromised when used for such purposes.

Animals: Circuses

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will introduce legislation to phase out the use of animals in circuses. [124133]

Mr. Bradshaw: In March 2006, I announced that I intend to introduce regulations under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 to ban the use, in travelling circuses, of certain non-domesticated species whose welfare needs cannot be satisfactorily met in that environment.

A Circus Working Group has been formed to assist us in forming a decision on which non-domesticated species should be banned from travelling circuses.

The group has set up three specialist sub groups to source and review available scientific evidence. This includes an academic sub-group drawn exclusively from scientists and veterinarians. The working group as a whole will then provide a report setting out the findings to DEFRA Ministers. We hope to have draft regulations available for full public consultation during 2007, with the aim of bringing them into force in 2008.

Any ban will only apply to travelling circuses. Zoo performances, performances in the audio visual industry and performances in static circuses will not be affected. We have no plans to ban the use of domesticated animals from performing in travelling circuses.

Avian Influenza: Vaccination

Mr. Peter Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whom he expects to represent his Department at the Vaccination: a tool for the control of avian influenza conference in Verona on 20 to 22 March 2007. [124157]

Mr. Bradshaw: Officials from DEFRA’s Exotic Disease Prevention and Control Division and Veterinary Exotic Diseases, Research and Official Controls Division will be attending.


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Commercial Wastes

Gregory Barker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what material is included within his Department’s definition of commercial waste; [123194]

(2) what percentage of commercial waste was (a) landfilled, (b) recycled, (c) incinerated and (d) re-used in the latest period for which figures are available. [123195]

Mr. Bradshaw: Commercial waste is defined in section 75 (7) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and regulation 6 of and schedule 4 to the Controlled Waste Regulations 1992 (S.I. 1992 No. 588) as

This definition excludes household waste, industrial waste, agricultural waste and waste from any mine or quarry. Examples of the waste that the definition includes are: office waste, restaurant or bar waste, shop waste, leisure centre waste and warehouse or site waste. However, this list is not definitive.

According to the latest survey carried out by the Environment Agency in 2002-03, around 30 million tonnes of commercial waste was produced by England in that year. Of this total, approximately 52 per cent. was landfilled; 34 per cent. was recycled; 6 per cent. was re-used and 3 per cent. was incinerated with energy recovery.

Gregory Barker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what percentage of mining and quarry waste was (a) landfilled, (b) recycled, (c) incinerated and (d) re-used in the latest period for which figures are available. [123197]

Mr. Bradshaw: The latest information(1), show an estimated 96.5 million tonnes of mineral waste arisings in the UK in 2004.

Non-mineral waste from mines and quarries was included as a ‘controlled waste’ only when the Waste Management (England and Wales) Regulations 2006 (S.I. 2006 No. 937) came into force on 15 May 2006. Data on the total waste arising from mines and quarries and its disposal routes, are therefore not available.

The Waste Management Regulations apply the same national waste management controls to non-mineral waste from mines and quarries that have long applied to other sectors of industry.

In addition, implementation of the EU Mine Waste Directive will require operators to provide more information regarding the likely volume of waste they produce and how this will be managed.

Gregory Barker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what materials are included within his Department’s definition of industrial waste; [123198]


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(2) what percentage of industrial waste was (a) landfilled, (b) recycled, (c) incinerated and (d) re-used in the latest period for which figures are available. [123199]

Mr. Bradshaw: Industrial waste is defined in section 75 (6) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and regulation 5 of and Schedule 3 to the Controlled Waste Regulations 1992 (S.I. 1992 No.588). It includes waste from any factory and from any premises occupied by an industry (excluding mines and quarries).

According to the latest survey carried out by the Environment Agency in 2002-03, around 38 million tonnes of industrial waste was produced in England in that year. Of this total, approximately 38 per cent. was land-filled; 37 per cent. was recycled; 12 per cent. was re-used and 3 per cent. was incinerated with energy recovery.

Gregory Barker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what percentage of construction and demolition waste was (a) landfilled, (b) recycled, (c) incinerated and (d) re-used in the latest period for which figures are available. [123200]

Mr. Bradshaw: According to the latest data available(1), the total construction and demolition waste produced in England in 2005 was estimated at 89.6 million tonnes.

Of this, 52 per cent. was recycled and a further 17 per cent. was spread on exempt sites (usually land reclamation, agricultural improvement or infrastructure projects). The remaining 31 per cent. was sent to landfill (including backfilling at quarries, and landfill engineering) as waste.

Electricity: Carbon Emissions

Gregory Barker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with his colleagues in the Department of Trade and Industry about the inclusion of grid electricity low carbon milestones in the Energy White Paper. [123881]

Ian Pearson: The Government are taking forward the development of the policy proposals set out in the Energy Review Report. Discussions on a wide range of subjects have taken place at the ministerial and official levels between my Department and the Department of Trade and Industry.

Flood Control

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the proportion of flood defences in need of significant maintenance. [123664]

Ian Pearson: The Environment Agency (EA) is the principal authority with responsibility for flood risk management in England. The EA keeps records of the condition of flood defences that it maintains, together
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with the condition of defences maintained by third parties where they contribute to protecting communities.

Across England, 4 per cent. of these defences are in poor or very poor condition and 44 per cent. are in a fair condition. Significant maintenance will be required on the majority of these defences in the medium term. All defences, even those in good condition, require maintenance to ensure that they continue to provide an appropriate standard of flood risk reduction.

Solar Power: Carbon Emissions

Gregory Barker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what his Department’s estimate is of the (a) solar photovoltaic and (b) solar hot water needed to deliver a 10 per cent. carbon emissions reduction in an average UK house. [124443]

Ian Pearson: The average UK household emits around 1.6 tonnes of carbon per year. 10 per cent. savings from solar photovoltaic (PV) would require 12 square meters of panels, costing around £6,000 to install. The same savings from solar water heating would require around 7.5 square meters, costing typically £4,500.

The annual savings from 12 square meters of solar PV panels would be worth £136 per year (not including any revenue from Renewable Obligation subsidies, or any maintenance costs). The annual savings from 7.5 square meters solar water heating panels would be around £88 per year.

International Development

Afghanistan: Overseas Aid

Mark Simmonds: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) outcomes and (b) outputs have been of the money his Department has spent in Afghanistan for reconstruction and development since the invasion; and if he will make a statement. [122767]

Hilary Benn: DFID spent £390 million on reconstruction and development in Afghanistan between April 2001 and March 2006. We plan to spend a further £102 million in 2006-07. DFID has a performance management and reporting system in place to assess the outcomes of our work, although there are well-recognised issues with attribution of development spending. Specific outputs are identified for every DFID project at design stage. These are monitored and reported against on an annual basis, as well as at project completion. Project reporting feeds into annual country level reporting and divisional level reporting, and finally into the departmental report. This is presented to Parliament every year. The relevant sections of the departmental reports for 2001 to 2006 illustrate the achievements of our Afghanistan programme.

DFID now puts over 50 per cent. of its funding through the Government of Afghanistan’s national budget via the World Bank managed Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF). This supports the Afghan Government in delivering its own priority outputs and outcomes. Since 2002 DFID has
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channelled £235 million through the ARTF. This has helped the government to deliver essential public services: for example through the timely payment of over 100,000 teachers' salaries each month. DFID has led the development of a performance assessment matrix for the ARTF. This will further improve the monitoring of outputs and outcomes of spending through the national budget.

Other achievements since 2001 which are attributable to combined donor-government efforts include: the number of functioning health clinics has increased by 60 per cent.; 72 new hospitals and clinics have been built; £16 million vaccinations have been administered against childhood diseases, saving an estimated 35,000 lives; over 13,000 primary and secondary schools have been reconstructed; school enrolment has quadrupled; and nearly six million Afghan children are now in school, a third of them girls. Since 2003 economic growth has averaged over 10 per cent. per annum (8 per cent. in 2006-07) and private investment has risen from $22 million to over $400 million. GDP per capita has increased from $182 per capita in 2002 to $335 per capita in 2006, and government fiscal revenue has risen almost five-fold in the same time period: from around $115 million per annum to around $520 million per annum.

CDC

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) salaries and (b) bonuses were of each member of the Board of Directors of the CDC Group plc. in each of the last seven years; and what the (i) salaries and (ii) bonuses of each of the managing partners of Actis was in each year since 2004. [121930]

Hilary Benn: The fees of the chairman and the non-executive directors of CDC are set in agreement with government in accordance with the guidelines for public appointments of this type. The remuneration committee of the board, consisting of the non-executive directors, sets the remuneration of the Chief Executive Officer, within a framework agreed with the government.

Details of fees, salaries and bonuses paid to directors of CDC are published in the Director’s Remuneration Report of the CDC Annual Report and Accounts for each year since 1999. The 2006 Report has not yet been published and the remuneration figures are therefore not yet available.

The remuneration of Actis Managing Partners is governed by the terms set out in the Actis ‘Members’ Agreement,’ the document that details how the business is to be run and its governance arrangements. The remuneration committee of the board, consisting of certain non-executive directors, sets the remuneration of the managing partners, within a framework that has been agreed with the government.

The Actis annual accounts for the years 2005 and 2004, which are available from Companies House, provide details of how much is earned by the partner with the highest entitlement to the share of Actis profits. Further details of the total remuneration of Actis Managing Partners are confidential under the terms of the Members Agreement.


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Convention for the Protection of All People from Enforced Disappearance

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will make a statement on the International Convention for the Protection of All People from Enforced Disappearance. [121927]

Mr. McCartney: I have been asked to reply.

The UK welcomes this new convention. We hope it will be an important tool in preventing enforced disappearance in the future.

The UK was active throughout the negotiations to draft the convention, and we supported its adoption at both the UN Human Rights Council and the UN General Assembly. At the adoption of the convention the UK made an interpretative statement clarifying our understanding of certain provisions, including what constitutes an enforced disappearance, the application of obligations under international humanitarian law and the procedures applicable to the adoption and placement of children whose parents had been subject to an enforced disappearance. This statement can be found at:

I will send a copy of the statement to the hon. Member and also arrange for a copy to be placed in the Library of the House.

The Government now need to conduct a detailed analysis of the provisions of the treaty and their implications for implementation in order to determine the UK's position towards ratification, including whether we would need to make any reservations. We understand that 57 states (including 10 member states of the European Union) have so far signed the convention. The convention requires 20 states to ratify in order to enter into force.


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