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12 Mar 2007 : Column 47W—continued


12 Mar 2007 : Column 48W

(c) CT scans
Financial year
HSS Trust 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06

Altnagelvin

4,409

4,391

4,723

4,732

5,149

Belfast City

10,053

11,815

11,283

12,066

12,580

Causeway

2,450

2,547

2,890

3,067

2,724

Craigavon

(1)7,666

(1)7,614

(1)8,332

11,058

12,794

Down Lisburn

2,299

2,228

2,474

2,547

3,076

Greenpark

0

0

0

143

854

Mater

2,593

2,702

2,838

3,168

3,187

Newry and Mourne

1,247

2,383

2,365

2,837

3,395

Royal

9,961

11,282

11,461

12,378

13,687

Sperrin Lakeland

4,579

4,290

4,444

5,574

6,539

United

3,396

7,412

7,451

9,149

10,359

UCHT

4,402

4,682

5,365

5,783

6,097

(1) South Tyrone hospital started to use the CRIS system in June 2004. The NIRADS system was used prior to June 2004. Therefore, the data detailed above for 2004-05 are not a full financial year and the data shown for the years 2001-02 to 2003-04 do not include South Tyrone.
Source:
HPSS Trusts

The number of patients who are waiting to have (i) an ultrasound scan, (ii) an X-ray and (iii) a CT scan performed in each health trust in the Province are detailed in the following table.

Diagnostic test
HSS Trust (i) Ultrasound (ii) X-ray (iii) CT scan

Altnagelvin

1,164

200

402

Belfast City

1,382

0

1,089

Causeway

1,041

155

319

Craigavon

1,725

206

810

Down Lisburn

718

168

77

Greenpark

123

0

30

Mater

470

21

484

Newry and Mourne

881

180

229

Royal

963

7

601

Sperrin Lakeland

747

42

52

United

1,999

274

809

UCHT

1,126

0

330

Notes:
1. Figures are correct as at 26 January 2007.
2. The information supplied by the HPSS Trusts has not been validated by the Department.
Source:
HPSS Trusts

Defence

Afghanistan: Equipment

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 26 February 2007, question 111865, what differences there are between the Tempest and Mastiff vehicles, with regard to (a) normal operations in theatre and (b) mine protection; and if he will make a statement. [125002]

Mr. Ingram: Mastiff has been procured to meet the requirement for a medium protected patrol vehicle. It
12 Mar 2007 : Column 49W
will be used to transport conventional forces who will conduct patrolling tasks and other duties as military commanders see fit. It has been optimised for this role through a series of modifications, which include additional protection measures and self defence equipment.

The Tempest Mine Protected Vehicle has been configured for use by Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) teams for specialist tasks such as EOD reconnaissance, rescue and recovery and route proving; they have some UK specific EOD modifications.

I am withholding details about specific levels of protection as the information would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of our armed forces.

Afghanistan: Peace Keeping Operations

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will increase the number of (a) fixed wing and (b) rotary heavy lift aircraft deployed to Afghanistan. [124134]

Des Browne: We currently assess that there are sufficient air assets in Afghanistan for Commanders to do the jobs they need to do.

I announced a substantial force package uplift on 26 February which included, among other things, the deployment of four Sea King helicopters and an additional C-130 Hercules which will significantly improve our lift capabilities in Afghanistan.

Armed Forces: Medical Records

Mr. Harper: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what systems are in place to catalogue and account for medical records of British service personnel; [121519]

(2) how many British service personnel's medical records are missing. [121520]

Derek Twigg: A complete medical record is maintained for every member of the armed forces. This facilitates where necessary any ongoing medical treatment and supervision wherever the individual is serving, and provides an audit trail of responsibility for those engaged in the care and treatment of patients.

The custody and security of medical and dental documents of all personnel is the responsibility of the senior Medical Officer (MO) or (for the Navy) the Medical Branch Rating (MBR) of the establishment or ship in which the individual is serving. To prevent breaches of medical confidentiality, accidental or otherwise, all medical records are kept secure at all times. They are not kept in the possession of any person other than the MO or medical staff in the course of their duties. When not in use all such documents, notes, correspondence and external media used to store medical data are kept in a locked container.

Quarterly musters of all medical records held are carried out in all primary care units against unit nominal lists, and more frequently when required (e.g. when a unit is formed or deployed). During musters, medical records are scrutinized by physically inspecting the main service medical record known as “F Med 4”
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form which are a series of documents which record an individual’s medical history. These are cross-checked against other records to ensure that personnel remain in-date; records are accurate; and no treatments or appointments are outstanding. Scrutiny of medical records is carried out on receipt of a new “F Med 4” and on notice of drafting or deployment.

When an individual is receiving secondary-care treatment in an NHS hospital, any medical notes are the responsibility of the NHS Trust where the treatment is taking place. When an individual is discharged from hospital, the hospital discharge report is enclosed in the “F Med 4”, along with other clinical reports such as Laboratory, Physiotherapy and X-ray. The same procedures apply for documentation from MOD Regional Rehabilitation Units, Departments of Community Mental Health and other directly managed units such as the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre at Headley Court.

There is currently no centrally available source of information regarding the number of missing medical records, and the information could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. The information could be obtained only by requesting every military medical centre in the UK and overseas to provide details of records not held at their last quarterly medical records muster.

Armed Forces: Orthopaedics

Nick Harvey: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many service personnel have suffered amputations as a result of wounds received on active service in (a) Iraq and (b) Afghanistan. [119395]

Derek Twigg: The Complex Rehabilitation and Amputee Unit (CRAU) at the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre (DMRC), at Headley Court in Surrey, has since 1 June 2006 (the date on which it became fully operational) treated a total of 42 service amputees. Of these, 14 were casualties from Op. Telic (Iraq) and six from Op. Herrick (Afghanistan).

Prior to CRAU becoming operational, comprehensive information on the number of military personnel who have suffered amputations as a result of wounds received on active service was not held centrally. To provide this information would require the examination of the individual medical records of each patient who has been classified as very seriously injured (VSI) or seriously injured (SI) in Iraq and Afghanistan. These records can only be viewed for non-clinical reasons with the express consent of each individual concerned, to protect patient confidentiality.

Army: Afghanistan

Sir Peter Tapsell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many officers serving with the British Army in the Helmand Province of Afghanistan have passed an oral examination in the Pashto language. [124667]

Mr. Ingram [holding answer 5 March 2007]: All regular and reserve service personnel deploying on operations receive some level of language training, ranging from a few hours to a ten week course. Selected individuals receive longer periods of training.


12 Mar 2007 : Column 51W

There are currently 25 members of the British Army who have passed a speaking exam in Pashto. Of these, 16 are Army officers, one of whom is currently deployed in the Helmand Province of Afghanistan.

Astute Class Submarines

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what meetings he has had with representatives of BAE Systems on the finalisation of a price for Astute boats two and three. [125806]

Mr. Ingram [holding answer 8 March 2007]: There have been no meetings regarding the finalisation of prices for Astute boats 2 and 3 between my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Defence and representatives of BAE Systems.

Atomic Weapons Establishment

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what percentage of the workforce at the Atomic Weapons Establishment is expected to retire in the next five years. [125805]

Mr. Ingram [holding answer 8 March 2007]: The Ministry of Defence does not hold such details about the workforce at the Atomic Weapons Establishment which is managed under Government Owned/Contractor Operated arrangements. However, the AWE contractor has advised that approximately 12 per cent. of the current workforce will reach retirement age before March 2012.

Atomic Weapons Establishment: Finance

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much each of the armed services is contributing to the planned additional spending at the Atomic Weapons Establishment in each of the next five years. [124587]

Des Browne: As the White Paper, “The Future of the United Kingdom’s Nuclear Deterrent”, published in December 2006, made clear, the investment required to maintain our deterrent will not come at the expense of the conventional capabilities our armed forces need. The additional investment at the Atomic Weapons Establishment averaging £350 million per annum over the years 2005-06 to 2007-08 was included in the Defence Budget through the 2004 Spending Review process. The Defence Budget for future years will be set in the Comprehensive Spending Review.


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