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15 Mar 2007 : Column 497W—continued


Table 2: Number( 1,2) of day care places for children under eight years of age by type of provider: Lancashire Position at 31 March each year: 1990 to 2002
Type of provider 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Day nurseries

9,900

(4)

8,800

9,600

10,900

(4)

Playgroups and pre-schools

8,200

(4)

6,600

6,600

6,500

(4)

Childminders

8,700

(4)

6,000

5,800

5,900

(4)

Out of school clubs

1,100

(4)

1,600

1,900

2,200

(4)

Holiday schemes(3)

1,500

(4)

900

700

600

(4)

(1) Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10 or 100 places.
(2 )Data Source: Children's Day Care Facilities Survey.
(3 )From 1999, places were counted once for each school holiday. Before 1999, places were counted once each year.
(4 )Not available.

Schools: Finance

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many local authorities have a control mechanism for surplus school balances; and how much was recycled using these mechanisms in the last year for which figures were available. [127079]

Jim Knight: In October 2006, the Secretary of State directed a revision of all local authority financial schemes, requiring the introduction of a claw back mechanism to be in place by 1 April 2007, in time for the new 2007-08 financial year.

Some authorities have already introduced a claw back mechanism in their local schemes prior to 2007-08. The precise operation of a claw back mechanism is a matter for local authorities to devise, in consultation with their schools and the local schools forum following the Department’s statutory scheme
15 Mar 2007 : Column 498W
guidance. The Department does not collect information on the level of funding recycled through claw back.

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills which local authorities have reported a contribution from their centrally retained schools budget to a combined services budget. [127081]

Jim Knight: The following table provides the information recorded by those authorities who have reported a contribution from their centrally retained schools budget to a combined services budget for 2006-07:

Budgeted net expenditure on contributions to combined budgets: 2006-07
Local authority name Contribution to combined budgets (£)

England

8,349,351

Barnet

365,500

Bolton

125,000

Cumbria

380,000

Derbyshire

500,000

East Sussex

300,002

Enfield

480,000

Greenwich

29,000

Hampshire

500,000

Haringey

950,000

Islington

263,515

Kingston upon Thames

75,000

Luton

206,369

North Yorkshire

594,248

Poole

46,000

Richmond upon Thames

50,000

Salford

276,636

Shropshire

265,867


Schools: Overseas Students

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many children from outside the UK are registered in schools in England, broken down by their country of origin. [126821]

Jim Knight [holding answer 12 March 2007]: The requested information is not collected centrally.

Schools: Sports

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if he will place in the Library copies of guidance in place on charging to use sports facilities at private finance initiative schools. [127415]

Jim Knight: Guidance is contained in the section ‘Use of Schools’ which forms Clause 29 of the Schools Standard Form PFI Agreement issued in May 2005. The agreement has been placed in the House Library.

Students: Fees and Charges

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of lifting the cap on top up fees in 2009 on application rates to university. [127769]


15 Mar 2007 : Column 499W

Bill Rammell: We have made no such assessment, which would be premature at this time. We have made clear our intention to establish an independent review of the introduction of variable tuition fees and the improvements to the student support system, which came into effect in autumn 2006. The review will be conducted by a commission, which will work on the basis of evidence from the first three years of operation of the variable fee arrangements. It will report to Parliament.

Teenage Pregnancy

Chris McCafferty: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what progress has been made in delivering the Government's strategy to combat teenage pregnancy; and if he will make a statement. [127485]

Mr. Dhanda: We are making steady progress in reducing England’s historically high teenage pregnancy rate. The latest data show that between the 1998 baseline year and 2005 the under-18 conception rate fell by 11.8 per cent. to its lowest levels for over 20 years. The under-16 rate fell by 12.1 per cent. over the same period.

Translation Services

Mr. Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what documents his Department and its agencies translate for people in the UK who do not speak English; into which languages such documents are translated; and what the cost was of producing such translations in each of the last five years, broken down by language of translation. [113885]

Bill Rammell: The information requested is as follows:

1. What documents are translated

The Department produces a large number of documents, each with a specific target audience. We recognise that some publications will have target audiences which include communities or individuals for whom English will not be the primary language. Decisions based on whether documents are translated, and if so into which languages, are made on a case by case basis, taking into account guidance provided by the Inclusivity Unit of COI Communications (Central Office of Information) on the specific communications needs of minority ethnic communities and the content and target audience of the particular publication. In general terms translations are undertaken for those communities who face high levels of social exclusion and are least likely to be fluent and literate in English.

Health

Bedford Hospital NHS Trust: Finance

Alistair Burt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans she had to write off the historic debt of Bedford hospital NHS trust. [127655]

Andy Burnham: All national health service bodies must live within their means and there can be no question of us simply writing off deficits when particular trusts have failed to operate within their budgets.


15 Mar 2007 : Column 500W

We recognise that it may be challenging for NHS trusts to pay back a large deficit that has built up over a number of years. However, the Department, and, consequently, the NHS, have to live within an agreed level of resources in each financial year. This level is set by HM Treasury and voted by Parliament. In order for the system as a whole to balance, a deficit in one organisation has to be matched by a surplus elsewhere.

In circumstances where a surplus cannot be generated in the following year, for example in the case of the small number of organisations with particularly large deficits, strategic health authorities can agree to a recovery plan which phases the recovery of those deficits over a number of years. This would require other NHS organisations within the health economy to underspend over the same period. Any such arrangements would have to be subject to the agreement of local providers, commissioners and the managing SHA.

Complaints

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information is made available to (a) patients and (b) patient groups on their rights to complain to strategic health authorities about the performance of primary care trusts; and if she will make a statement. [111749]

Andy Burnham: No information is made available to patients or patient groups specifically about complaining to strategic health authorities about the performance of primary care trusts (PCTs). Where a patient or patient group wishes to complain about a primary care trust, they should address their complaint directly to the PCT in question.

Responsibility for dissemination of information about complaints at local level rests with the local national health service organisation. Under Regulation 20 of the national health service (Complaints) Regulations 2004, each NHS body must ensure that there is effective publicity for its complaints arrangements. These regulations require NHS bodies to establish and operate complaints procedures with a view to securing a speedy resolution at local level. Where complainants are not satisfied with the result of an investigation at local level, they may request the Healthcare Commission to consider their complaint.

The Independent Complaints Advocacy Service (ICAS) was established to support patients and the public wishing to make a complaint about their NHS care or treatment. ICAS aims to ensure complainants have access to the support they need to articulate their concerns and navigate the complaints system, maximising the chances of their complaint being resolved quickly and effectively.

Efficiency Review

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she will break down the efficiency savings in each workstream referred to in the answer of 26 October 2006, Official Report, column 2087W, on the Efficiency Review, by area of savings. [123038]


15 Mar 2007 : Column 501W

Andy Burnham: The breakdown of savings within each workstream was as follows:

£ million

Procurement

Pharmaceuticals procurement

974

Supply chain efficiency programme

169

Purchasing and Supply Agency procurement

100

Independent Treatment Centre procurement

54

1,297

Productive time

Process improvement

1,024

Input costs

94

Time releasing

92

1,210

Social care

Cost efficiency programmes

121

Non cashable gains

58

179

Corporate services

Microsoft contract

30

Shared services

1

Electronic staff records

1

Electronic recruitment

6

38

Public Funding and Regulation (PFR)

Departmental operating costs

20

Arms length bodies

55

75

Total

2,799


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