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19 Mar 2007 : Column 684W—continued


Percentage of population receiving EMA in each academic year
2004/05( 1‘) 2005/06( 2) 2006/07( 3, 4)

Cumbria

32

27

23

North West

46

42

36

England

33

30

25

(1)16-year-olds only (2 )16 and 17-year-olds. (3 )16, 17 and 18-year-olds. (4) To end January.

Mr. Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) what percentage of young people in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK received education maintenance allowance in each year since the scheme's inception; [122059]

(2) how many people in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK received (i) £30, (ii) £20 and (iii) £10 a week in education maintenance allowance in each year since the scheme's inception. [122060]

Phil Hope: The Education Maintenance Allowance (EMA) is a devolved matter. In England, this is a matter for the Learning and Skills Council, who operate EMA for the DFES and hold the information about take-up of the scheme. Mark Haysom, the Council’s chief executive, has written to my hon. Friend with the information requested and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Library.

Letter from Mark Haysom, dated 12 March 2007:

Take-up of EMA in each academic year
2004-05
Band
£30 £20 £10 Total

South Tyneside

1,353

126

157

1,636

North East

15,698

1,753

1,958

19,409

England

242,507

27,429

27,632

297,568


2005-06
Band
£30 £20 £10 Total

South Tyneside

1,538

117

116

1,771

North East

21,609

2,282

1,864

25,755

England

359,792

39,892

30,643

430,327


2006-07 to end January
Band
£30 £20 £10 Total

South Tyneside

1,681

169

136

1,986

North East

24,559

2,867

2,593

30,019

England

406,319

49,863

43,993

500,175


Percentage of population receiving EMA in each academic year
2004/05 (16-year-olds only) 2005/06 (16 and 17-year-olds) 2006/07 to end January (16, 17 and 18-year-olds)

South Tyneside

39

36

32

North East

38

35

29

England

33

30

25


Jeff Ennis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many students claimed the education maintenance allowance in (a) Barnsley and (b) Doncaster in each of the last three years. [122789]

Phil Hope: This is a matter for the Learning and Skills Council, who operate EMA for the DfES and hold the information about take-up of the scheme. Mark Haysom, the Council's chief executive, has written to my hon. Friend with the information requested and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Library.


19 Mar 2007 : Column 686W

Letter from Mark Haysom, dated 12 March 2007:

Take-up of EMA in each academic year
2004/05 2005/06( 1) 2006/07

Barnsley

1,821

2,071

2,463

Doncaster

2,707

2,912

3,287

(1) To end February

Education: Guardian Newspapers

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how much was spent by his Department on the 14 to 19 reforms supplement it sponsored in The Guardian newspaper on 6 March; [127230]

(2) which civil servants within his Department contributed to the 14 to 19 reforms supplement in The Guardian newspaper on 6 March. [127231]

Jim Knight: The Department spent £42,000 on The Guardian Supplement covering the 14 to 19 reform programme. The 14 to 19 reforms will impact on a range of stakeholders and through the supplement we were able to inform head teachers, teachers and lecturers in schools and colleges, HE professionals, and the wider public about the reforms. We believe that this is good value for money as we were able to reach a large section of our target audience. As the 14 to 19 programme will require schools and colleges to collaborate in the future, and teaching of the diplomas will start from September 2008 we increasingly need to inform our target audiences about the reforms and the impact that they will have on them. We will therefore continue to promote the 14 to 19 reform programme across a range of news media over the next few months.

Although civil servants within the 14 to 19 reform group briefed The Guardian on the 14 to 19 reforms, the content of the supplement was written by Guardian journalists. As with most supplements of this nature officials from within the Department and across our partners were given the opportunity to correct factual errors within the final document. Final editorial control for the article was retained by The Guardian.

Employment Schemes: Greater London

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what plans he has to open the Train to Gain project in London to contestability by the private sector; and if he will make a statement. [126581]

Phil Hope: Train to Gain is already contestable in London, as in all regions. This means that employers are given a choice of training providers, wherever possible, to help them meet their business needs on the basis of analysis carried out by brokers. Training providers may be sourced from the public or private sector.


19 Mar 2007 : Column 687W

Employment Schemes: Incentives

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what steps he is taking to ensure brokers under the Train to Gain programme are incentivised to arrange placements, rather than visits to employers which do not result in placements; and if he will make a statement. [126580]

Phil Hope: Train to Gain brokers are incentivised on the basis of employer engagements, rather than on visits. An employer is considered to be engaged where the broker has undertaken an analysis of training needs and identified suitable providers. The Learning and Skills Council is actively performance managing the organisations contracted to deliver the service to ensure their effectiveness and efficiency.

English Language

Stephen Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills which individuals are entitled to free tuition on Entry 1 and Entry 2 level English for Speakers of Other Languages Courses. [126633]

Phil Hope: The Learning and Skills Council sets out the eligibility criteria for fee remission in the funding guidance for further education, updated each year.

Currently all English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) provision is fully funded, with free tuition for all learners. From August 2007/08 it is proposed that in order to receive fee remission an ESOL learner must fall into standard fee remission categories, for example, that they are in receipt of an income based benefit such as housing benefit.

The fee remission categories are set out in paragraph 127 of the Funding guidance for further education in 2006/07 and include:

My hon. Friend the Minister for Higher Education and Lifelong Learning has considered the impact of the proposed changes to ESOL funding following the race equality impact assessment (REIA) and he is minded to consider a range of new measures to reprioritise funding towards the most vulnerable. These are:


19 Mar 2007 : Column 688W

My hon. Friend the Minister for Higher Education and Lifelong Learning has asked officials to work with the Learning and Skills Council and other partners to finalise the detail urgently.

Stephen Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills whether English for Speakers of Other Languages provision at Entry 1 and Entry 2 levels is eligible for funding from the Learning and Skills Council; and if he will make a statement. [126634]

Bill Rammell: All Skills for Life English for Speakers of Other Languages provision at Entry 1 and Entry 2 levels is currently eligible for funding from the Learning and Skills Council and will continue to be so for 2007/08.


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