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19 Mar 2007 : Column 721W—continued


19 Mar 2007 : Column 722W

Information on the number of attendances at A&E departments is a separate collection.

Strategic health authority (SHA) name Admissions via type 1 (major) A & E Admissions via type 2 (single specialty) A & E departments Admissions via type 3 (minor injury and illness services) A & E departments Total admissions via A & E Population( 1) Admissions as percentage of population

England

2,947,677

37,062

25,675

3,073,151

50,431,65 4

6.1

North East

149,968

127

3,714

157,650

2,558,308

6.2

North West

525,953

5,063

2,374

540,827

6,846,249

7.9

Yorkshire and the Humber

305,719

0

1,475

308,669

5,063,944

6.1

East Midlands

187,863

4,140

1,629

199,401

4,306,335

4.6

West Midlands

289,334

5,265

48

299,960

5,365,438

5.6

East of England

270,579

3,304

1,932

281,051

5,541,636

5.1

London

551,730

3,802

55

559,444

7,517,726

7.4

South East Coast

225,299

14,144

11,955

277,497

4,213,904

6.6

South Central

170,196

755

1,575

174,856

3,950,320

4.4

South West

271,036

462

918

273,796

5,067,794

5.4

(1) Population data for mid-year 2006 are not yet available. Population data used are therefore 2003-based resident population projections for mid-year 2005 (based on 2001 census).
Note:
Data are for period January to December 2006 (quarter 4 2005-06 plus quarter 1 to quarter 3 2006-07).
Source:
Department of Health QMAE dataset and Office for National Statistics.

Bedford Primary Care Trust: Health Visitors

Alistair Burt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many health visitors are employed by Bedfordshire Primary Care Trust (PCT); and how many were employed by (a) Bedford PCT and (b) Heartlands PCT in (i) 2005, (ii 2004 and (iii) 2003. [118523]

Ms Rosie Winterton: Information as to the number of health visitors employed by the newly formed Bedfordshire Primary Care Trust (PCT) is not yet available. However, the following table shows the number of qualified health visiting staff in the old Bedford PCT and the old Bedfordshire Heartlands PCT as at 30 September for each year specified.

Headcount
2003 2004 2005

Total specified organisations

93

97

96

Bedford PCT

37

42

41

Bedfordshire Heartlands PCT

56

55

55

Source:
The Information Centre for health and social care non-medical workforce census.

Caesarean Sections

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) emergency and (b) planned caesarean births there were in each year since 1995. [126168]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The last year for which this information is available is 2004-05. Figures are shown in the table.

Elective Emergency

1995-96

40,889

56,297

1996-97

43,399

57,667

1997-98

46,215

60,840

1998-99

46,200

64,103

1999-2000

48,616

67,836

2000-01

48,365

69,800

2001-02

50,378

68,795

2002-03

50,964

69,596

2003-04

55,286

75,443

2004-05

54,905

79,436

Source: NHS Maternity Statistics, England 2004-05 (Table 3).

Care Homes: Finance

Mr. Dai Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what her assessment is of the policy implications of the judgment in the 2004 case of Goldsmith v. the London Borough of Wandsworth on the funding of care in nursing homes. [124191]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The Department has examined the Court of Appeal Judgment of 27 August 2004 and does not consider that it has implications for the policy on the funding of care in nursing homes.

Care Homes: Greater London

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the (a) average and (b) longest waiting times were for care assessments by each London borough council in each of the last five years. [125627]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The information has been placed in the Library. Table 1 shows the cumulative percentage of new clients aged 18 and over whose assessments were completed during the year by length of time from first contact to completed assessment for the years 2003-04 to 2005-06 for each London borough.


19 Mar 2007 : Column 723W

Table 2 shows the number of new clients whose assessments were completed during the year by the waiting time between first contact and completed assessment for the years 2003-04 to 2005-06 for each London borough.

Data for earlier years are not available on a comparable basis.

The information needed to calculate the average and longest waiting time for a care assessment is not collected centrally.

Childbirth

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many and what proportion of births were classed as normal in each year since 1995. [126167]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: For the years 2002-03, 2003-04 and 2004-05 the numbers of normal deliveries (defined as those without surgical intervention, use of instruments, induction, epidural or general anaesthetic before or during the birth) are set out in the table. Information for years before 2002 is not available centrally.

Number of deliveries Number of normal deliveries Percentage normal

2002-03

548,000

257,560

47

2003-04

575,900

264,914

46

2004-05

584,100

280,368

48


Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what international comparators she uses when assessing perinatal statistics. [127278]

John Healey: I have been asked to reply.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 19 March 2007:

Childbirth: Death

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many and what proportion of births resulted in (a) maternal and (b) perinatal death in each year since 1995. [126170]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: Confidential Enquiry into Maternal and Child Health (CEMACH)'s report on maternal death for the three-year period 2000-02 showed that there were 106 direct maternal deaths in that period, representing 5.3 deaths per thousand of the two million births. The next CEMACH report is expected at the end of the year.

Office for National Statistics data shows that in 2002, the most recent year for which figures are available, there were 4,977 perinatal deaths in 596,122 maternities, or 8.3 deaths per 1,000 pregnancies.


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