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16 Apr 2007 : Column 320W—continued


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Table 3 sets out the recent data available on the mean BMI for adults in the East of England Government office region (GOR) from HSE 2003. Data on the mean BMI for children in the East of England is unavailable. Information on the mean BMI for adults and children in Suffolk, Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire and Norfolk is also not available.

Table 3: Mean body mass index for adults( 1) , by East England Government office region, 2003
Percentage/number

Men

27.2

Women

26.9

Bases (unweighted)

Men

728

Women

825

Bases (weighted)

Men

755

Women

735

(1 )Aged 16 and over. Source: Health Survey for England 2003. Department of Health.

Breast Cancer: Greater London

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) when she expects breast cancer screening services to be resumed at the North London Breast Screening Service; [130231]

(2) what estimate she has made of what the likely backlog will be when screening resumes at the North London Breast Screening Service; [130235]

(3) for what reasons the decision was taken to suspend breast cancer screening services at the North London Breast Screening Service. [130236]

Ms Rosie Winterton: I am advised that the temporary suspension was due to system process errors that were brought to light during a routine audit being carried out by the Quality Assurance Service. The audit flagged up that women were not invited for further assessments, in line with service protocols, following their mammogram. All the women affected received a normal mammogram (i.e. no abnormalities appeared on the mammogram). However, the women had mentioned other possible symptoms during their appointment and guidelines specify that further assessment should take place.

I understand that Enfield Primary Care Trust is currently working towards the completion of detailed plans to reopen the service during April. The service has been subject to an external review by the National Breast Screening Service Quality Assurance Team. The implementation of all the recommendations arising from the review continues to form a key part of the planning process. The trust will be able to confirm the precise arrangements for resuming the service after the review team has completed its work, which is expected by the end of March.

The trust with their partner primary care trusts have an evolving action plan in place for the recommencement of screening and to clear the backlog, including investigating arrangements with other potential service providers and their ability to assist with the backlog.


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The unit is currently developing a full plan to facilitate the recommencement of screening services. Once this is complete the trust will be able to advise on estimates. It will also depend on whether arrangements can be put into place to screen women at other sites across London and the surrounding area. Women who have been waiting longest will be seen on a priority basis.

Approximately 3,500 women per month are normally seen by the service and it is estimated that approximately 10,000 women would have been affected by the suspension of the service.

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many breast screening appointments were (a) made and (b) cancelled other than by the patient in each London primary care trust in each calendar year since 2000. [130234]

Ms Rosie Winterton: This information is not held centrally.

Breast Cancer: Screening

Anne Milton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many women aged between 50 and 70 years are required to wait more than three years between breast cancer screenings in (a) Surrey Primary Care Trust and (b) England; what estimate her Department has made of the attendance take-up rate of women aged between 50 and 70 years attending breast cancer screenings in each area; and if she will make a statement. [127578]

Ms Rosie Winterton: Surrey Primary Care Trust is covered by the breast screening unit based at the Jarvis Centre, Guildford. According to figures from January to March 2006, the average interval between screens for women at the Jarvis Centre was 33 months, and 92 per cent. of women were screened within 36 months of their previous screen. In England the average interval between screens for the same period was 36 months, with 68 per cent. of women being screened within 36 months of their previous screen.

We take the issue of the 36-month standard between screens very seriously. That is why Professor Mike Richards, the National Cancer Director, wrote to the chief executives of all 10 strategic health authorities in England on 9 February 2007 highlighting the importance of maintaining the 36-month interval.

Burton Independent Sector Treatment Centre

Charlotte Atkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment the Health Care Commission has made of (a) the quality of care delivered at Burton Independent Sector Treatment Centre and (b) the level of patient satisfaction with the delivery of care. [130200]

Andy Burnham: As the independent inspection body for both the national health service and independent healthcare, the Healthcare Commission (HCC) is not part of the Department. Therefore, the information requested is not held centrally. However, information
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on the reviews of services undertaken by the HCC are available on their website at: www.healthcare commission.org.uk

All Independent Sector providers, including the Midlands Treatment Centre located in Burton, are required to achieve HCC approval before services are commenced and to meet subsequent reviews. We can confirm that the Midlands Treatment Centre did receive HCC approval for the start of services in July 2006.

Charlotte Atkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the targeted case volume is for Burton Independent Sector Treatment Centre; and what proportion of that volume was achieved in each year since it was set up; [130201]

(2) what operating and medical procedures Burton Independent Sector Treatment Centre undertakes; and whether these differ from those carried out in its first two years. [130205]

Andy Burnham: The Midlands National Health Service Treatment Centre, situated in Burton, opened in July 2006. The case mix at the treatment centre continues to include ENT (ears nose and throat), general surgery, gynaecology, OMFS (face/jaw), ophthalmology, pain relief, plastics, rheumatology, trauma and orthopaedics and urology.

The Department measures independent sector treatment centre contract performance on the basis of value rather than activity. This is to allow for the variations, which can occur through substitution of activity between procedures of varying value.

Charlotte Atkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what impact the Burton Independent Sector Treatment Centre has had on (a) capacity and (b) waiting times in Staffordshire hospitals in each year since it was established. [130202]

Andy Burnham: The Midlands Treatment Centre, located in Burton, has been able to provide additional surgical capacity in the Staffordshire area while offering patients a wider choice of provider for their treatment.

It is also believed that the facility has helped local national health service hospitals in achieving their maximum waiting time targets. As at January 2007, no patients in the Stoke on Trent, North Staffordshire and the South Staffordshire primary care trusts were waiting in excess of 26 weeks for inpatient treatment or 13 weeks for an outpatient appointment.

Charlotte Atkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what role Burton Independent Sector Treatment Centre has in training medical staff; [130203]

(2) what staff the Burton Independent Sector Treatment Centre employs; and from where they were recruited. [130204]

Andy Burnham: The Midlands National Health Service Treatment Centre, situated in Burton, provides training and supervision to its medical staff. The training includes continuing professional development, infection control, equipment and information management and technology.


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Junior doctors work in the treatment centre alongside consultants as part of their training programme. The consultants remain responsible for clinical care and the training delivered as required. The agreement is that the direction and management of training of clinical trainees largely replicates current NHS training processes.

The treatment centre employs 179 staff (headcount), the majority of which were recruited from the United Kingdom.

Cancer

Dr. Tony Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what research is sponsored by her Department to assess the effectiveness of dichloroacetate in attacking cancer cells. [123532]

Caroline Flint: None. The Medical Research Council (MRC), one of the main agencies through which the Government supports medical and clinical research, is currently funding a broad portfolio of cancer research, including early stage trials and basic and underpinning research. The MRC has not received or considered any proposals to assess the effectiveness of dichloroacetate in attacking cancer cells. The Council always welcomes high quality applications for support in any aspect of biomedical research and these are judged in open competition with other demands on funding.

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people diagnosed with cancer there were in (a) England and Wales and (b) Gloucestershire, broken down by type of cancer in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [131171]

John Healey: I have been asked to reply.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 16 April 2007:


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Table 1: Registrations of newly-diagnosed cases of cancer: by selected cancer( 1) , sex and region, 2000-04
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Males

England and Wales

All cancers xnmsc

122,046

124,103

123,225

123,917

126,539

Prostate

24,737

27,796

28,591

28,812

31,676

Lung

20,312

19,820

19,220

18,786

19,403

Colorectal

16,670

16,191

16,273

16,634

17,231

Gloucestershire

All cancers xnmsc

1,842

2,005

1,783

1,856

2,201

Prostate

309

354

301

324

373

Lung

176

189

146

151

147

Colorectal

189

191

161

198

212

Females

England and Wales

All cancers xnmsc

122,127

122,877

121,542

125,134

123,883

Breast

35,978

36,493

36,670

38,901

39,308

Colorectal

14,248

13,955

13,926

13,894

14,361

Lung

12,882

12,768

12,687

13,042

13,269

Gloucestershire

All cancers xnmsc

1,921

1,865

1,778

1,907

2,429

Breast

435

467

443

526

471

Colorectal

176

154

154

154

163

Lung

127

110

106

134

93

(1) Cancers are coded to the International Classification of Diseases (Tenth Revision):
Colorectal C18-21, Lung C33-34, Breast C50, Prostate C61, All cancers excluding non-melanoma skin cancer C00-97 xC44.
Source:
Office for National Statistics

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