Previous Section Index Home Page

16 Apr 2007 : Column 504W—continued


Security Guards: Licensing

Mr. McGovern: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) which organisations the Security Industry Authority consulted before implementing the latest increase in licence fees for security officers; [130319]

(2) whether he was consulted by the Security Industry Authority before they implemented the latest increase in licence fees for security officers. [130321]

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 27 March 2007]: The fee to be paid on application for a licence under the Private Security Industry Act 2001 is prescribed by the Secretary of State in regulations. Following consideration by the Home Office of the SIA’s proposals for an increase in the fee the Secretary of State agreed to make the necessary regulations.

An updated regulatory impact assessment was published on 12 January 2007, setting out the case for an increase from 6 April in the fee, which must be set at a level to enable the SIA to recover its costs.

The fee will increase when the Private Security Industry Act 2001 (Licences) Regulations 2007 come into force on 6 April.

Security: Heathrow Airport

Mr. Wallace: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what role his Department is playing in the miSense project at Heathrow Airport. [128052]

Mr. Byrne: IND staff were directly involved in enrolling passengers for the miSensePlus and miSenseAllclear scheme but played no role in the miSense trial. All the miSense trials are a proof of concept and delivered by a collaboration of nine partners led by the British Airports Authority (BAA). Participation in the schemes was on an entirely voluntary basis and following the end of the trial period, all personal data are being erased.

Sentencing

Ann Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to make a decision on the recommendations of the Sentencing Advisory Panel on guidelines for sentencing shoplifters. [129980]


16 Apr 2007 : Column 505W

Mr. Sutcliffe: It is not for the Secretary of State to make decisions on recommendations by the Sentencing Advisory Panel. The Sentencing Advisory Panel produces advice for the Sentencing Guidelines Council, whose role it is to consult and draw up final guidelines. The Government will have an opportunity to comment on any draft, but the final decision on the content of guidelines is for the Sentencing Guidelines Council.

Serious Organised Crime Agency

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many seizures of Class A drugs have been made by Serious Organised Crime Agency officers since 1 April 2006; and what the estimated total value of these seizures is. [124770]

John Reid: For the period April 2006 to September 2006 SOCA was involved in the seizure of the following Class A drugs as shown in the table.

Drug Quantity (approximate) Numbers of Seizures

Heroin

1,300 kg

47

Cocaine

35,000 kg

64

Ecstasy

4.2 million pieces

10

Opium

160 kg

1

LSD

1 million doses

1


The estimated street value of these seizures would have been approximately £1.8 billion.

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much has been spent on (a) stationery for the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) and (b) promotional merchandise branded with SOCA’s name and logo. [124772]

John Reid: It has not been possible for SOCA to give an exact figure for their spend on office stationery to date, however, for the period April 2006 to September 2006, SOCA spent £522,500 on stationery and office consumables. Of this, SOCA estimates that £189,000 was spent on stationery.

For the period April 2006 to September 2006, SOCA spent £12,714.74 on promotional material branded with SOCA’s name and logo (excluding headed stationery).

Mr. Jeremy Browne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what system of accountability is in place to monitor the work of the Serious Organised Crime Agency. [130190]

Mr. Coaker: The chair, non-executive directors and the director general of SOCA are all appointed by the Home Secretary; SOCA publishes an annual plan before the beginning of each financial year; and an annual report as soon as possible after the end of each financial year. This is in line with the requirements of the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005.

Before the commencement of SOCA a management statement and financial memorandum was drawn up setting out the overarching framework within which the organisation will operate and a copy of SOCA's MS/FM was placed in the Library.


16 Apr 2007 : Column 506W

Regular meetings take place between the chair and director general of SOCA and the Home Secretary and Ministers. The chair and the director general have made several appearances before Select Committees in the House of Commons and the House of Lords, as well as meeting various all-party parliamentary groups. Senior managers of SOCA also have regular meetings with the Home Office sponsor team.

Shoplifting: Lancashire

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many shoplifting offences were recorded in Lancashire in each of the last five years. [130715]

Mr. Coaker: The information requested is given in the table.

Offences of theft from shops in Lancashire
Number of offences

2001-02

8,050

2002-03(1)

7,781

2003-04

8,579

2004-05

8,254

2005-06

8,655

(1) The National Crime Recording Standard was introduced in April 2002. Figures before and after that date are not directly comparable.

Stop and Search: Terrorism

Mr. Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 15 March 2007, Official Report, column 557W, on stop and search: terrorism, how many of those searched in each category were subsequently charged with (a) terrorism-related offences and (b) other offences. [130333]

John Reid: The Office of Criminal Justice Reform does not collate charge data following a stop-search under section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000.

Terror Suspects

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many of the people who were detained without charge on suspicion of terrorist offences between 11 September 2001 and 31 December 2006 were held for (a) more than 10 days, (b) longer than 20 days and (c) 27 or 28 days; [129933]

(2) how many of the persons who were detained without charge on suspicion of terrorist offences between 11 September 2001 and 31 December 2006 were held for (a) more than 10 days, (b) longer than 20 days and (c) 27 or 28 days before a charge was brought against them. [129934]

John Reid: The maximum period of detention pre-charge was extended to 14 days on 20 January 2004 and subsequently up to 28 days with effect from 25 July 2006. The following table shows a breakdown of detention statistics compiled from police records covering the period 20 January 2004 to 31 December 2006.


16 Apr 2007 : Column 507W
Period of detention Number of persons detained Charged Released without charge

10-20 days

55

45

10

20-27 days

0

0

0

27-28 days

6

3

3

Total

61

48

13


Terrorism

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 6 March 2007, Official Report, column 1945W, on terrorism, when he expects to publish Lord Carlile of Berriew's report on the definition of terrorism. [130766]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 29 March 2007]: Lord Carlile of Berriew’s report was published on 15 March.

Terrorism Act 2000

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will break down by ethnicity the number of those (a) arrested, (b) charged and (c) convicted under the Terrorism Act 2000 since its inception. [129374]

Mr. McNulty [ holding answer 28 March 2007]: The Home Office does not collate information on the ethnicity of individuals arrested, charged or convicted under the Terrorism Act 2000.

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been arrested under the Terrorism Act 2000 since 1 January 2006; and how many were held within 24 hours of the maximum allowable period. [129375]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 28 March 2007]: Statistics compiled from police records show that from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2006 156 arrests were made under the Terrorism Act 2000. The maximum period of detention pre-charge was extended to 28 days with effect from 25 July 2006.

Statistics compiled from police records show that from 25 July 2006 to 31 December 2006 six people have been held for 27-28 days.

Terrorism: Crime Prevention

Mr. Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many incidents have been reported to the anti-terrorism hotline since its introduction; and if he will make a statement. [129185]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 22 March 2007]: Records of the number of calls received by the hotline have been kept from 1 January 2004. The total number of calls until 31 March 2007 was 9,474.

Number of calls

2004

860

2005

(1)7,422

2006

929

2007(2)

263

(1) This figure includes the period 7 July 2005 until 8 August 2005 during which time 6,468 calls were recorded. This was in the immediate aftermath of the terror attacks on London on 7 July 2005.
(2) 1 January 2007 to 31 March 2007.

16 Apr 2007 : Column 508W

Mr. Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people are employed to handle calls received by the anti-terrorism hotline. [129186]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 22 March 2007]: The anti-terrorist hotline is staffed by two civilian staff and two police officers between the hours of 7 am and 6 pm, and outside these hours by one civilian staff and one police officer. The hotline is based within the Counter Terrorism Command at New Scotland Yard.

In the event of a major incident a contingency plan has been devised substantially to increase the capacity to answer incoming calls. This is an operational matter for the police. We cannot comment further.

Terrorism: Detainees

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of those detained under the Terrorism Acts (a) were seeking asylum at the time of their detention and (b) have subsequently claimed asylum. [130815]

Mr. McNulty: The information requested can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Terrorism: Lancashire

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people (a) arrested, (b) charged and (c) convicted under the Terrorism Act 2000 were from (i) Lancashire and (ii) Ribble Valley. [130427]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 30 March 2007]: The Home Office does not collate statistics by geographical or force area. From 11 September 2001 to 31 December 2006 there have been a total of 1,166 arrests of which 1,126 arrests were made under the Terrorism Act 2000 and 40 arrests under legislation other than the Terrorism Act, where the investigation was conducted as a terrorist investigation.

Of the 1,166 arrests, 117 were charged with terrorism legislation offences only, 104 were charged with terrorism legislation offences and other criminal offences and 186 were charged under other legislation. Of those charged, 40 were convicted under the Terrorism Act 2000 and 180 convicted under other legislation.

Terrorism: Telephone Services

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many telephone calls were received by the Anti-Terrorism Hotline in each of the last 12 months for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [130808]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 29 March 2007]: From the period 1 January to 31 March 2007, 263 calls were received by the Anti-Terrorism Hotline. From 1 January to 31 December 2006, 929 calls were received. A monthly breakdown is detailed in the table.


16 Apr 2007 : Column 509W
Monthly breakdown of calls received by the Anti-Terrorism Hotline
2006 2007

January

69

52

February

75

52

March

52

159

April

60

May

49

June

65

July

91

August

180

September

130

October

65

November

51

December

42

Total

929

263


Next Section Index Home Page