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17 May 2007 : Column 873W—continued


Since 1997 there have also been expansions within around 80 existing prisons providing approximately 11,000 new places of the 17,000.

Prison Service

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice pursuant to her answer of 31 January 2007, Official Report, column 367W, on the Prison Service, (1) how many inmates have not been fingerprinted in the prison population; and if she will make a statement; [137353]

(2) how many prison establishments are not in full compliance with the National Security Framework policy on fingerprinting; and if she will make a statement. [137354]

Mr. Sutcliffe: This information is not held centrally and could be obtained only at a disproportionate cost.

Prison Service: Career Structure

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice what mechanisms exist to regulate the promotion of staff working within HM Prison Service; and if she will make a statement. [137726]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Promotion in the Prison Service is based on competence. For most posts this will be by way of a competence based application form and interview. Job Simulation Assessment Centres (JSACs)
17 May 2007 : Column 874W
are used to accredit staff at key operational promotion points. In exceptional circumstances, a managed appointment may be used to post someone on promotion.

Prison Service: Manpower

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice what the shortfall is of prison staff at (a) operational support grade, (b) prison officer, (c) senior prison officer, (d) principal prison officer and (e) governor grade level; and if she will make a statement. [137485]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The shortfall against staffing requirement across the public sector Prison Service in the specified grades is shown in the table. Contracted prisons have different grade structures and are therefore excluded.

Shortfall against operational staffing requirement
Grade Shortfall at 30 April 2007( 1,)( )( 2,)( )( 3)

Operational Support Grades

245

Prison Officer

596

Senior Officer

104

Principal Officer

33

Operational Managers (previously known as Governors)

36

(1) The shortfall is shown after accounting for the contribution of contracted supplementary hours among officers and agency staff for OSGs and is the sum of shortfalls at all establishments that have a shortfall in one or more grade types.
(2) The totals have not been offset by surpluses at other locations.
(3) The information is derived from the Personnel Corporate Database, Oracle HRMS and Quarterly Forecast Change Forms. These systems are liable to the normal inaccuracies associated with any large-scale reporting systems.

Prison Service: Pay

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice what the cost would be to HM Prison Service of paying off all outstanding time off in lieu hours at the contract hours rate; and if she will make a statement. [137285]

Mr. Sutcliffe: It is not the policy of the Prison Service to make payment to staff in respect of outstanding time off in lieu except in exceptional circumstances i.e. a member of staff leaving the service. However, at 31 March 2006, the date of the last set of audited accounts, the cost of paying all outstanding amounts would have been £1,470,713 at the contracted hours rate.

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice how much was spent by HM Prison Service on payments to staff whilst suspended from duty in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement. [137310]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Prison Service does not summarise the costs in this way and would need to review individual files which could be done only at a disproportionate cost.


17 May 2007 : Column 875W

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice what mechanisms exist to determine the award of bonuses within HM Prison Service; who is responsible for determining the size of the budget to be used for bonuses; and if she will make a statement. [137723]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Prison Service Order 8480 Performance Recognition details the criteria which determine the award of bonuses within HM Prison Service. These criteria allow managers to award a bonus payment of up to £2,000 and, with Director General approval, a bonus payment of between £2,001 and £20,000. The size of the budget for bonuses is determined by the budget holder and may not exceed 0.5 per cent. of the pay bill costs in any business unit.

Prison Service: Training

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice what the average cost was of (a) recruiting and (b) training a prison officer in each of the last three years; and if she will make a statement. [137302]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The information requested on the average cost of recruiting and training a prison officer is not available centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Prison Service: Unfair Dismissal

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice what the cost was to HM Prison Service in each of the last four years for (a) compensating staff sacked unfairly, (b) compensating staff constructively dismissed and (c) paying the total legal costs of these dismissals; and if she will make a statement. [137287]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Prison Service does not summarise the costs in this way and would need to review individual files which could be done only at a disproportionate cost. The total amount of compensation paid to staff, including legal costs in each of the last four years was:

£

2003-04

913,645

2004-05

948,089

2005-06

1,797,823

2006-07

493,991


Prison Service: Working Hours

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice what hours (a) non-operational and (b) operational prison governors are expected to work; what salary is received by each; and if she will make a statement. [137299]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Prison Service does not have non-operational prison governors. Operational managers have a pattern of attendance that is unpredictable. It is impossible to construct weekly
17 May 2007 : Column 876W
conditioned hours as limits for normal attendance are variable. However, regard is taken of the working time regulations 48 hours average weekly limit.

Salary rates for operational managers are determined annually by the Prison Service Pay Review Body (PSPRB). Current rates from 1 April 2007 are:

£
Grade Minimum p.a. Maximum p.a.

Senior manager A

60,442

77,945

Senior manager B

55,528

76,793

Senior manager C

53,357

69,157

Senior manager D

44,589

63,535

Manager E

29,184

43,927

Manager F

26,280

37,262

Manager G

23,434

30,676


A required hours addition is also payable to operational managers E to G at a rate of £5,356 per annum.

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (1) what definition of excessive working hours is used by HM Prison Service; and if she will make a statement; [137301]

(2) what steps she is taking to reduce the culture of long hours in HM Prison Service; what (a) monitoring and (b) controls are in place to support this objective; and if she will make a statement. [137303]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Uniformed grades are contractually required to work 39 hours per week, average on a predictable shift cycle. Non-operational governor grades are required to notionally work 41 hours in the London area and 42 elsewhere, including meal breaks. Operational governors work on the basis of being available to respond to emergency situations and therefore are unable to work a set shift cycle. However, working arrangements are set so as to ensure that there is an on-call rota system to ensure hours are spread evenly across available staff. Governors do not work regularly in excess of guidelines set by the Working Time Directive.

In-charge governors are aware of the Working Time Directive and are responsible for monitoring the hours worked by all staff in their establishment.

Prisons

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice pursuant to her answer of 31 January 2007, Official Report, column 367W, on prisons, what assessment she has made of the level of compliance with the requirements for fingerprinting at prison establishments; and if she will make a statement. [137722]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The information requested is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Prisons: Compensation

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice which five prison establishments spent the highest proportion of their budget on (a)
17 May 2007 : Column 877W
legal costs and (b) compensation payments in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement. [137311]

Mr. Sutcliffe: It is not possible to allocate legal costs to individual compensation payments without reviewing individual files which could be done only at a disproportionate cost.

Compensation payments are not met from establishment budgets but are funded from centrally held funds. The five prison with the highest costs as a proportion of their budget in each of the last five years are:

2006-07

2005-06

2004-05

2003-04

2002-03

Prisons: Standards

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice what steps she is taking to advertise the results of professional standards investigations to HM Prison Service staff; and if she will make a statement. [137284]

Mr. Sutcliffe: At present we do not advertise the results of professional standards investigations. However, this will be considered as part of an ongoing improvement plan to strengthen the Prison Service’s approach to tackling corruption.

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice how many area professional standards managers do not have operational experience
17 May 2007 : Column 878W
in prison establishments; and if she will make a statement. [137305]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Two of the area professional standards managers currently in post have not worked in an operational role in a prison establishment.

Privacy

Mr. Heald: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice if she will take steps to introduce a requirement to produce privacy impact assessments when regulatory impact assessments are undertaken. [137180]

Mr. McFadden: I have been asked to reply

Following a public consultation, on 2 April 2007 the Government announced the introduction of a new impact assessment (IA) process focused on improving the quality of the economic and other analysis underpinning policy-making.

While the Government have no current plans to incorporate privacy impact assessments into the IA process, they will consider the appropriate way to assess these impacts as proposals arise. In addition, as policy makers are already asked to take account of the full range of economic, social and environmental costs and benefits of their proposals, it would be expected that where privacy issues have a material impact on assessing the costs and benefits of proposals, these would also be taken into account.

Details of the new IA can be found at:


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