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6 Jun 2007 : Column 566W—continued

Departments: Telephone Services

Mark Lazarowicz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many telephone helplines are sponsored by her Department with the prefix (a) 0870 and (b) 0845; and whether alternative geographic numbers are available in each case. [138484]


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Mr. Ivan Lewis: The Department’s main public facing telephone inquiry service, the Customer Service Centre, has a geographic number (020 7210 4850). The Department also uses a Government wide switchboard service (020 27210 3000). There are individual switchboard services for the Department’s main buildings and these have geographic telephone numbers.

The Department’s Executive Agencies, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Service (MHRA) and the NHS Purchasing and Supply Agency (PASA) also have geographic numbers.

The Department has a Healthy Start (formerly known as the Welfare Foods Helpline), a service operated under contract to provide assistance to nurseries and individuals with inquiries about welfare foods e.g. milk tokens. The numbers for members of the public are 0845 6076833/6076823. The numbers for commercial providers are 08707 203063/201688. These will be reviewed as part of the contract review in 2008.

NHS Direct uses a 0845 number 0845 4647. There is no geographic alternative.

The Department grant funds a wide range of voluntary and charitable organisations to provide services relating to health and healthy living. Some of these organisations include telephone helplines as part of their services. It is not possible, without incurring disproportionate cost, to identify individual projects with telephones services and whether geographic telephone numbers are used.

Diabetes: Screening

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many people with diabetes who are unable to leave their home unaided have (a) been offered screening for diabetic retinopathy and (b) registered on a national screening programme; [139237]

(2) how many people with diabetes registered in a national screening programme for diabetic retinopathy are being screened annually; [139238]

(3) how many people with diabetes offered screening for diabetic retinopathy (a) registered in national screening programmes and (b) participated in a national screening programme in each year since 2003-04. [139239]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The data are not held centrally on how many people with diabetes who are unable to leave their home unaided have been offered screening for diabetic retinopathy.

The information in the following tables show the number of people with diabetes offered screening for diabetic retinopathy and the number of people receiving screening broken down by year.

Table 1
Number of people with diabetes offered screening for diabetic retinopathy

2003-04

835,900

2004-05

1,076,400

2005-06

1,478,223

2006-07

1,593,644


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Table 2
Number of people with diabetes receiving screening for diabetic retinopathy( 1)

2003-04

(2)753,997

2004-05

1,076,388

2005-06

1,232,043

2006-07

1,256,463

(1) Data from Local Delivery Plans returns
(2) Data for year 2003-04 was an incomplete return

Disabled: Milton Keynes

Mr. Lancaster: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in (a) Milton Keynes and (b) England were registered as having a temporary disability which leads to reduced mobility in each year since 1995. [140740]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: This information is not held centrally.

Eating Disorders: Children

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many children between the ages of 10 and 18 years were treated for (a) bulimia and (b) anorexia in each of the last 10 years. [139116]

Ms Rosie Winterton: Information is not collected in the format requested. Information is available from 1996-97 onwards about the number of finished consultant episodes where the primary diagnosis was anorexia or bulimia.

We take the issue of eating disorders, especially among young people, very seriously. This is why the Department asked the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to produce a clinical guideline on the core interventions in the treatment and management of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and related eating disorders, and which NICE published in 2004. The guideline covers physical and psychological treatments, treatment with medicines, and information specifically for patients, carers and the general public. The guideline is due for review in January 2008.

Count of finished consultant episodes where there was a primary diagnosis of anorexia or bulimia; 1996-97 to 2005-06.

NHS Hospitals, England
Anorexia Bulimia

2005-06

620

23

2004-05

517

23

2003-04

532

22

2002-03

552

32

2001-02

497

26

2000-01

469

19

1999-2000

482

28

1998-99

465

24

1997-98

484

46

1996-97

419

49

Notes:
A finished consultant episode is a period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. Please note that the figures represent the number of treatment episodes provided, but do not represent the individual number of patients seen, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the year.

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Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many (a) hospitals, (b) clinics, (c) health centres and (d) other care providers within the NHS specialise in the treatment of children suffering from eating disorders; [139117]

(2) how many cases of children being admitted to hospital for illnesses or conditions relating to eating disorders were as a result of intervention from (a) a teacher, (b) a parent and (c) a health worker in each of the last 10 years. [139136]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The information requested is not collected centrally.

We take the issue of eating disorders, especially among young people, very seriously. This is why the Department asked the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to produce a clinical guideline on the core interventions in the treatment and management of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and related eating disorders, and which NICE published in 2004. The guideline covers physical and psychological treatments, treatment with medicines, and information specifically for patients, carers and the public. The guideline is due for review in January 2008.

In the five years to the end of March 2007, we have invested over £400 million of additional money into the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) provided by the national health service and local authorities. These funds have assisted in meeting and then maintaining the Department’s public service agreement standard of a comprehensive CAMHS, including services for young people with an eating disorder. Further funds totalling over £100 million have been made available to the NHS and local authorities in 2007-08 to help maintain this progress.

As primary care trusts (PCTs) consider local health needs and commissioned services, they will need to assess whether the right balance exists between in-patient care and home-based care, particularly at highly specialised levels, to help individuals with eating disorders. This means that PCTs will need to consider their commissioning role, where they work with local organisations and opportunities exist to commission services jointly, for example, where voluntary organisations can provide services more effectively than statutory services.

Between 2004 and 2009, the Department is also funding a five-year initiative, Shift, to tackle the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental health issues in England. Shift works with young people and
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professionals to promote awareness of all mental health problems, including eating disorders.

The Department funds several voluntary sector organisations involved with eating disorders, including Weight Concern and Beat, formerly the Eating Disorder Association, for whom we are funding a three-year pathways to recovery project, which provides a support network of people who have had eating disorders.

Eyesight: Testing

Mr. Baron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether children in full-time education being educated at home have the same rights to (a) free NHS sight tests and (b) vouchers to cover other costs of ophthalmology as children in full-time education being educated in institutions; what guidance she has issued to (i) opticians and (ii) local authorities to reflect these entitlements; and what evidence must be accepted as proof of a child being in full-time education at home. [140435]

Ms Rosie Winterton [holding answer 4 June 2007]: All children under the age of 16 are entitled to national health service sight tests and vouchers for optical appliances, as are children aged 16, 17 and 18 who are being educated full-time in a recognised educational establishment. The Department has not previously issued specific guidance on this subject. Where children aged 16 to 18 are being educated at home, the local primary care trust would need to seek advice from the local education authority to assess whether these arrangements are comparable to full-time education in such an establishment.

General Practitioners

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many general practitioners per head of population there were in (a) Stroud constituency, (b) Gloucestershire, (c) the South West and (d) England in each year since 1997. [138654]

Andy Burnham: The number of general practitioners per 100,000 population from 1997-2006 is shown in the table for England and South West Strategic Health Authority and Gloucestershire Primary Care Trust (PCT) from 2001, the year PCTs were established, to 2006. Information is collected by primary care trust and it is not possible to map this to a specific constituency.


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General medical practitioners (excluding retainers and registrars)( 1) per 100,000 head of population, by specified organisations( 2) , 1997 to 2006 , England
N umber ( H eadcount)
1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

England

GMPs(1)

28,046

28,251

28,467

28,593

28,802

29,202

30,358

31,523

32,738

33,091

GMPs(1 )per 100,000 population

57.6

57.9

58.1

58.1

58.2

58.8

60.9

62.9

64.9

65.3

South West

GMPs(1)

3,014

3,071

3,096

3,129

3,159

3,225

3,361

3,620

3,809

3,807

GMPs(1) per 100,000 population

62.4

63.3

63.4

63.6

63.8

64.9

67.2

71.8

75.1

75.0

Gloucestershire PCT

GMPs(1)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

348

352

367

412

429

399

GMPs(1) per 100,000 population

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

61.6

62.2

64.6

71.9

74.6

69.4

n/a = Data not available. (1) General Medical Practitioners (excluding retainers and registrars) includes GP Providers and GP Others. (2 )Organisations in the NHS were restructured in 2001 and 2006. The data above are based on SHA and PCT boundaries as at 1 October 2006. Data from 2001 to 2005 have been mapped to 2006 boundaries but this is not possible for data prior to 2001. This should be taken into consideration when making comparisons between 2006 and earlier years.
Notes:
1. Mid-year ONS 2006 population figures for PCTs are not yet available, therefore 2005 PCT figures have been used for 2006 organisation calculations; as a result these figures are subject to change. 2. Data as at 1 October 1997-99 and 30 September 2000-06.
Source s : The Information Centre General and Personal Medical Services Statistics. Mid-year Resident Population Estimates, Office for National Statistics. An A-Z list of the doctors in Gloucestershire can be found at: www.glosgoodhealth.org.uk/goodhealth/az_doctors.htm

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