Previous Section Index Home Page

11 Jun 2007 : Column 742W—continued


11 Jun 2007 : Column 743W

Since April 2005, Sport England has awarded funding to non-Olympic sports to support the delivery of their four-year strategic plans and has not ring-fenced funding for high performance programmes within the overall allocation per sport per plan. National governing bodies apply the funding they receive to deliver against a range of key performance indicators (KPIs). Sport England has said that it is not, therefore, possible to identify specific funding amounts for high performance programmes.

The exceptions to this are the Football Association and the Lawn Tennis Association, neither of which has any elite-orientated KPIs and apply funding devolved to them through their whole sport plans solely to grassroots and development activities.

Sports: Public Participation

Hugh Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what assessment Sport England has made of the impact of high performance programmes in non-Olympic sports on mass participation rates. [142032]

Mr. Caborn: Sport England has not carried out any specific research to explore the impact of high performance programmes in sports outside the Olympic movement on mass participation rates.

Sports: Rural Areas

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what assessment she has made of the likely effects of the establishment of sporting villages on the surrounding areas. [140989]

Mr. Caborn: No formal assessment has been made of the likely effects of the establishment of community sports hubs (formerly known as sports villages) on the surrounding areas. Sport England is currently assessing the feasibility of the model. However I would expect these hubs to significantly improve community facilities and have a positive impact on regeneration in the areas where they are based.

Sports: Schools

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (1) if she will make it her policy to offer the Panathlon Challenge financial support; [141159]

(2) what representations she has received from (a) hon. and right hon. Members, (b) schools, (c) teachers, (d) parents and (e) others on the funding position of the Panathlon Challenge in each of the last two years; [141160]

(3) what recent research she has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the effectiveness of the Panathlon Challenge in increasing the involvement of school children in competitive sport; and if she will make a statement. [141169]

Mr. Caborn: No such research has been commissioned. The Government are committed to establishing a framework for competitive sport through the National School Sport Strategy, which includes a national network of Competition Managers who
11 Jun 2007 : Column 744W
promote competitive sport; and the UK School Games, which is developing competitive sporting opportunities for young people between now and 2012.

My Department has received one public petition on funding for the Panathlon Challenge and the following other representations:

2006 2007

MP's

1

7

Schools/teachers

10

0

Parents

0

0

Others

7

3


The Government have committed over £1.5 billion of funding to school sport in the five years to 2008, including over £800,000 from the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) for the Panathlon Challenge. DfES have no plans to commit further funding to the Panathlon Challenge.

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if she will make a statement on her plans to expand competitive sport in schools. [141168]

Mr. Caborn: Increasing the quality and amount of competitive school sport is at the heart of the work of all School Sport Partnerships.

The 2005-06 School Sport Survey showed that:

To support and further develop our work on competitive school sport, we are establishing a network of competition managers across School Sport Partnerships.

The first wave of 20 competition managers were appointed from September 2005 and the recruitment of a second wave of 42 competition managers is almost complete. Between September 2006 and March 2007 there were over 150,000 attendances by young people at over 2,000 competitions organised by competition managers. A further wave of recruitment will begin later this year raising the total number of competition managers to at least 90 by the end of 2007.

In addition, we have established the UK school games to help develop the content and structure of competitive sporting opportunities for young people between now and 2012.

Theatre: Disabled

Susan Kramer: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what funding will be made available for theatre groups working with disabled performers in 2008-2011 in (a) London and (b) England. [140812]

Mr. Lammy: Arts Council England budget allocations for 2008-09 onwards have yet to be decided.

Susan Kramer: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what funding has been made
11 Jun 2007 : Column 745W
available for theatre groups working with disabled performers for 2005-2007 in (a) London and (b) England. [140814]

Mr. Lammy: Government funding for the arts is distributed, within broad guidelines, through Arts Council England. The following figures provide a breakdown of its funding to theatre organisations that include disability as an element or focus of their programming or activity.

Regular funded organisations
£000
London England

2005-06

2,132

3,233

2006-07

2,172

3,297


Grants for the arts funding (April 2005 to September 2006 )
£000

London

1,117

England

3,791


It has not been possible to provide figures for funding to organisations where disability is an inclusive or integrated part of their work.

Defence

Afghanistan: Peacekeeping Operations

Mr. Carswell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of the adequacy of supplies of ammunition to the grenade machine gun in Afghanistan; and if he will make a statement. [138533]

Mr. Ingram: Although usage of ammunition for the Automatic Lightweight Grenade Launcher has been higher than initially anticipated, this issue has been successfully addressed through our Urgent Operational Requirement process. Supply has been increased to meet the requirement and in-theatre stocks of ammunition are currently assessed as adequate.

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what most recent estimate he has made of planned troop numbers in Afghanistan for each of the next four years. [141380]

Des Browne: The situation in Afghanistan is liable to change over the forthcoming four years and our force package will adapt to the evolving situation, including the ability of the Afghan National Army to take greater responsibility for its own affairs.

Mr. Lancaster: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many recorded casualties there were in categories (a) T1, (b) T2, (c) T3 and (d) T4 in (i) Afghanistan and (ii) Iraq in each month since January 2004. [141767]

Des Browne: Tl-4 are triage categories, used by in-theatre medical staffs to prioritise the treatment of casualties following an incident, Tl being most urgent. These categories are dynamic, based on a variety of
11 Jun 2007 : Column 746W
physiological factors (e.g. pulse and breathing rate) and do not necessarily correspond to the severity of the injury sustained. For example, Tl may subsequently be categorised as very seriously injured (VSI), seriously injured (SI) or unlisted (UL) once they reach a field hospital. We do not record and verify data on triage levels centrally.

The MOD is committed to openly publishing statistics on the number of service personnel injured on operations. Information on casualties and fatalities in Iraq and Afghanistan is published on the MOD website:

Aircraft: Electronic Engineering

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what independent safety assessment his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on Kapton wiring; what assessment his Department has made of the implications for the UK fleet of the role of the performance of Kapton wiring in the September 1998 crash of Swissair flight 111 over Nova Scotia; and if he will make a statement. [140912]

Mr. Ingram: At the time of the crash of Swissair Flight 111 we were already aware of the potential safety issues associated with Kapton wiring.

In 1987, the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency carried out an investigation of Kapton wiring. The investigation resulted in a number of specification requirements, which now form the basis of tests included in British Standards and in Defence Standards. These Defence Standards are the benchmark for all general airframe electrical wiring used on UK military aircraft.

Armed Conflict: Journalism

Mr. Don Foster: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make it his policy to establish a full and open inquiry into the deaths of journalists in conflict where the UK is involved; and if he will make a statement [140891]

Mr. Ingram: Our policy, produced in consultation with editors and press and broadcasting organisations, and the British Red Cross, is that the MOD will seek to assist appropriate inquiries into the death or injury of a journalist inside a conflict zone so far as we can. We would not normally conduct such inquiries ourselves.

Armed Forces

Mr. Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish the job descriptions of those employed in the household of the (a) Chief of the General Staff, (b) Adjutant General, (c) General Officer Commanding Northern Ireland and (d) Commander in Chief Land. [134202]

Derek Twigg: The job description of those employed in each household is shown in the following table.


11 Jun 2007 : Column 747W

11 Jun 2007 : Column 748W
Rank Description

CGS

House manager (colour sergeant)

Responsible for day to day running of household. Planning and organising functions. Liaising with Kensington Palace on matters concerning security and repair. Managing household accounts and claims at initial level. Organising hosting of high profile guests.

House orderly (corporal)

Responsible for day to day running of residence.

Assisting in planning and organisation of functions.

Ensuring good husbandry of CGS’s uniform and formal forms of dress.

Assisting the House Sergeant in the management and organisation of CGS’s household. Assisting with the hosting of high profile guests.

Cleaner (civilian contractor)

General cleaning of the residence. Assistance with routine household duties including laundry and ironing.

GOC NI

House sergeant (sergeant)

Responsible for the day to day running of residence. Managing the staff and house account. Supporting all official and social functions as directed by GOC. Responsible for ensuring good husbandry of GOC’s uniform and formal forms of dress.

Cook (corporal)

Working when required in support of official functions. Consulting with GOC over menu recommendations and preparation. Cleaning of kitchen and cooking equipment to ensure high standards of hygiene are maintained. Assisting with service, where necessary at large functions. Working in officers’ mess when not required by GOC.

Gardener

Maintenance of garden, grounds, outbuildings and garden equipment. Planting and developing garden and vegetable patch. Weeding and clearance of fallen leaves and debris.

Cleaner (civilian)

General cleaning of house and immediate exterior. Assistance with routine household duties including bed making, laundry and ironing. Occasional back of house assistance at functions.

CinC Land

House sergeant (corporal)

Responsible for day to day running of household. Managing civilian staff. Organising and implementing functions. Greeting VIPs in CinC’s absence. Security of residence including liaison with civil police. Liaison with DHE and outside agencies on maintenance of the official residence.

House orderly (private soldier)

Responsible for day to day running of residence and all associated functions in the absence of the house sergeant. Ensuring good husbandry of all the CinC’s uniform and formal forms of dress.

Chef (part-time—24 hours per week) (civilian contractor)

Preparing and producing lunch, main meals, snack meals, buffet meals. Cleaning of kitchen and cooking equipment to ensure high standards of hygiene are maintained. Assisting with ordering of goods, monthly stock take, invoices and checking deliveries.

Gardener (civilian contractor)

Trimming of grass and associated edges. Bushes and shrubs to be trimmed and kept free of weeds. All outside areas to be kept tidy and cleared of fallen leaves and branches. Fenced walls to be kept clear of brambles, overhanging branches and undergrowth. If applicable, vegetable areas to be tended.

Cleaner (civilian contractor)

General cleaning within the house and immediate exterior. Washing up, bed making, washing and ironing and any other normal household duties as required.

Assistant cleaner (part-time—15 hours) (civilian contractor)

General cleaning within the house and immediate exterior. Washing up, bed making, washing and ironing and any other normal household duties as required.

Adjutant General

House sergeant (sergeant)

Responsible for day to day running of residence. Organising and implementing social and work related functions. Greeting VIPS in AG’s absence. Security of residence including liaison with civil police. Liaising with DHE, MHS and outside agencies regarding maintenance of the official residence. Ensuring good husbandry of all AG’s uniform and formal forms of dress.

Gardener (32 hours per week) (civilian contractor)

Trimming of grass and associated edges. Bushes and shrubs to be trimmed and kept free of weeds. All outside areas (three acre area) to be kept tidy and cleared of fallen leaves and branches. Fenced walls to be kept clear of brambles, overhanging branches and undergrowth. Vegetable areas to be tended.

Domestic assistant (civilian contractor)

General cleaning within the house and immediate exterior. Washing up, bed making, washing and ironing and any other normal household duties as required.


Next Section Index Home Page