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Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 12 June 2007

Culture, Media and Sport

Bookmakers: Licensing

Mr. Andy Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what representations she has received on the level of licence fees from the Gambling Commission for bookmakers; and if she will make a statement. [142184]

Mr. Caborn: My Department has received 246 responses relating to this issue. This includes 134 formal responses to the consultation exercise in 2006 and 112 associated follow-up queries. We have also had a number of meetings with representatives of the betting industry, including with the Association of British Bookmakers.

Departments: Carbon Emissions

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what methodology is used by her Department to account for its carbon emissions. [140781]

Mr. Lammy: The Department has not formally adopted a methodology to account for its carbon emissions. We calculate our carbon emissions following DEFRA guidelines.

Departments: Public Relations

Grant Shapps: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much was spent by her Department on public relations in each of the last five years. [139416]

Mr. Lammy: The Department’s public relations spend in the last five years occurred only in 2004-05 and 2005-06 and relates to the digital campaign, aimed at increasing public awareness of digital switchover, and the licensing campaign aimed at small businesses to increase awareness of the implications of the Licensing Act.

Spend (£)

2004-05

100,000

2005-06

250,000

2005-06

24,300


Departments: Sign Language

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what assessment she has made of the merits of providing British Sign Language (BSL) videos on her departmental website for the benefit of those whose first language is BSL. [142490]


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Mr. Lammy: My Department has made no assessment of the merits of providing British Sign Language videos on its departmental website.

National Lottery

Anne Milton: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many representations she had received as of 4 June 2007 on the Gambling (Lottery Machine Interval) Order; what assessment her Department has conducted of the likely effect of the implementation of such an order on small clubs; what discussions she has had with representatives of licensed establishments that cannot sell lottery tickets from vending machines concerning the order; and if she will make a statement. [141769]

Mr. Caborn: The consultation on the Gambling (Lottery Machine Interval) Order 2007 closed on Friday 18 May. The Department received 18 formal responses. In addition, more than 200 clubs and a number of hon. Members wrote to the Department.

A partial regulatory impact assessment was issued alongside the consultation and is available on the Department’s website at

A full regulatory impact assessment is currently being prepared and will be available shortly in the House Library.

Ministers and officials have met representatives of the clubs sector on a number of occasions to discuss the order.

National Lottery: Sales

Mr. Swire: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the monthly sales of the Olympic lottery game have been since its launch; and what the monthly sales of all other lottery games have been over the same period. [142162]

Mr. Caborn: The table (provided by the National Lottery Commission) shows the split between sales of National Lottery games designated to support the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games and all other National Lottery games. The figures are monthly and go back to July 2005 when the first game designated to support the Olympics went on sale.


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Month NLDF sales OLDF sales Total sales

2005

July

508,018,924

272,493

508,291,417

August

370,245,832

5,370,216

375,616,048

September

366,530,671

4,526,347

371,057,018

October

445,823,655

5,473,990

451,297,645

November

362,404,450

3,625,094

366,029,544

December

474,765,469

3,813,771

478,579,241

2006

January

448,994,006

7,435,371

456,429,377

February

409,802,098

15,005,060

424,807,158

March

362,890,506

15,517,327

378,407,833

April

447,954,473

9,721,769

457,676,242

May

352,895,359

8,030,915

360,926,273

June

349,081,164

6,826,427

355,907,591

July

432,523,867

16,434,352

448,958,219

August

342,507,120

18,427,346

360,934,466

September

430,610,691

21.796,695

452,407,386

October

395,378,054

19,888,015

415,266,069

November

430,491,594

20,222,146

450,713,739

December

435,816,849

23,739,535

459,556,384

2007

January

338,847,852

20,531,989

359,379,842

February

361,523,375

23,344,416

384,867,792

March

426,964,830

26,514,508

453,479,338


Education and Skills

Adult Education: Basic Skills

Mr. Boris Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many (a) adults and (b) adults over 25 years received (i) Learning and Skills Council funding and (ii) funding through Train to Gain in (A) 2003-04, (B) 2004-05 and (C) 2005-06. [138367]

Phil Hope: Figures for adults funded by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) can be derived from the Individualised Learner Record (ILR). The following table shows the number of adult learners (aged 19 and over) and adult learners aged 25 and over on LSC-funded further education, Work Based Learning and Adult and Community Learning provision in 2003/04, 2004/05 and 2005/06.

Thousand
Adults Adults aged 25+

2003/04

4,587.8

3,801.8

2004/05

4,547.1

3,731.1

2005/06

3,872.4

3,125.4


The Train to Gain programme was piloted from April 2006 onwards. A full rollout of Train to Gain commenced from 1 August 2006. To January 2007 there have been 89,000 learners who have enrolled on Train to Gain.

Pre-School Education: Codes of Practice

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if his Department will commission an independent regulatory impact assessment on the 2006 Code of Practice on free entitlement to nursery education; and what assessment he has made of the impact of the implementation of the code on the number of children's nurseries. [141426]

Beverley Hughes: The single substantive change to the delivery of the free early education entitlement, set out in the 2006 code of practice, was the extension of the minimum free entitlement from 33 to 38 weeks. Following full public consultation, we made clear our recognition that not all providers would be able to extend their provision to 38 weeks and that, at each
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local authority's discretion, they could be funded for the provision they actually delivered. Furthermore, all local authorities received additional funding to support the extension to the free entitlement. We therefore concluded that there should not be a substantive regulatory impact and that a regulatory impact assessment was not required. We have no plans therefore for an independent impact assessment.

We have no evidence of the code of practice having a significant impact on the number of early years settings.

Pre-School Education: Finance

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what consideration local authorities give to the level of private, voluntary and independent nursery sector provision when determining the levels of funding under the free entitlement requirements for providers in the area. [141425]

Beverley Hughes: Funding for nursery education provision is provided to local authorities through the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG). Local authorities—in consultation with their School Forums—are responsible for deciding how best to apply their total school and early years funding across all age groups and between different types of provider, based on an assessment of local circumstances.

The code of practice on the provision of free nursery education places for three and four-year-olds requires local authorities to ensure settings are funded equitably, transparently and fairly, reflecting local need and circumstances. My letter in December 2006, to all local authority chief executives reiterated this point and asked them to reassure themselves that their funding levels support a diverse local child care market and take into account the impact on provider sustainability.

Vocational Training: Finance

Mr. Boris Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many (a) adult learners and (b) adult learners over 25 years receiving Learning and Skills Council funding excluding funding through Train to Gain were given workplace training in (i) 2003-04, (ii) 2004-05 and (iii) 2005-06, broken down by number of hours of workplace training given. [138364]

Phil Hope: Figures for adults funded by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) can be derived from the Individualised Learner Record (ILR). The following table shows the number of adult learners (aged 19 and over) and adult learners aged 25 and over on LSC-funded work based learning provision in 2003/04, 2004/05 and 2005/06.

Thousand
Adults Adults aged 25+

2003/04

235.7

3.0

2004/05

227.2

7.2

2005/06

217.6

9.0


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It is not possible to break down these figures by number of hours of work place training given as this varies for each type of provision and subject sector. The Train to Gain programme was piloted from April 2006 with a full rollout commencing from 1 August 2006 and Train to Gain activity is recorded for the first time in the 2006/07 ILR.


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