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19 Jun 2007 : Column 1769W—continued

Terry Lloyd

Mr. Don Foster: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what (a) correspondence and (b) discussions his Department has had in response to the finding of the coroner in October 2006 that ITN correspondent Terry Lloyd was killed unlawfully; and if he will make a statement. [140909]

Des Browne: As a UK civilian killed abroad, the responsibility for progressing Mr. Lloyd’s case was taken up by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Attorney-General’s Office.

Home Department

Anti-Semitism

Mr. Carswell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the effect of the activity of extremist imams and radical islamists on the incidence of anti-Semitic attacks in the UK. [142127]

Mr. Woolas: I have been asked to reply.

The Department for Communities and Local Government does not carry out assessments on the effect of the activity of extremist imams and radical islamists on the incidence of anti-semitic attacks in the UK. However, these issues are a matter for the police both in their assessment of risk in communities and in tackling individuals that break the law.


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Biometrics: Databases

Mr. Vara: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many records are held on the National DNA database, broken down by reason for their inclusion; and how many of those records are of individuals who (i) were not charged and (ii) were charged and found not guilty of an offence. [143118]

Joan Ryan: As of 10 June 2007, there were an estimated 3,976,090 individuals on the National DNA Database (NDNAD).

The purpose of the National DNA Database is to hold a record of a person’s DNA which can be matched against DNA taken from crime scenes. It does not hold data on arrests, charges and convictions—that is held on the police national computer (PNC). Current information on the number of individuals who were not charged, or charged and not found guilty, could be obtained only at disproportionate cost by cross-searching the NDNAD profiles against records held on PNC.

However, information is available from a cross-searching exercise carried out on the police national computer on 14 July 2006. This showed that at that date, 79.3 per cent. of those on the NDNAD who also had an entry on PNC had a conviction or a caution (ie a criminal record). The remaining 20.7 per cent. are persons who have been arrested for a recordable offence where no further action was taken; persons who have been charged with a recordable offence where proceedings are ongoing; and persons under 18 who have a formal warning or reprimand recorded on PNC.

Crime Prevention

Mr. Allen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on progress since his meeting with the hon. Member for Nottingham North and George Hosking of Wave Research on 6 December 2006 regarding crime prevention and early intervention. [139874]

Mr. Coaker: The Home Office is supportive of the early intervention work my hon. Friend and others are taking forward in Nottingham. However, regretfully we are unable to provide direct funding for his proposals at this time.

The Government are already doing a great deal to support similar activity through the Respect and the Social Exclusion Action Plans, including strands led by the DfES and the YJB. Nottingham has benefited significantly from this, and it is likely that there will also be further opportunities to bid for other funding to support this work in Nottingham in due course.

Crimes of Violence: Sussex

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps he is taking to reduce levels of violent crime in Sussex police authority area. [141828]

Mr. Coaker: The Government are currently taking forward a wide range of work which will continue to reduce violent crime. We have, for example, recently
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passed the Violent Crime Reduction Act, which gives the police and local communities the powers they need to tackle guns, knives and alcohol-related violence.

There are currently a number of violent crime operations being taken forward in Sussex, including: Operation Jardon, tackling football-related crime, and based on experience from the 2004 Euro Championship—penalties are used for anyone drunk and behaving in an antisocial manner, and for licensees serving alcohol to drunk and underage customers; and Operation Columbus, designed to ensure the safety and wellbeing of visiting international language students. Across East and West Sussex, a range of activities have been implemented in support of District Plans, such as CCTV in taxis in Eastbourne. Specifically in Brighton, a number of successful projects, including the Safe Haven project, have been taken forward in conjunction with the Centre for Public Innovation. Brighton hopes to repeat this particular experience this summer.

Domestic violence is also a priority. The WORTH project provides immediate support to people experiencing domestic violence. Hospital staff in A&E and midwifery are fully trained, and a team of fully trained caseworkers respond immediately to victims needing help. An Individual Support Programme for children (WISP) has also been successfully introduced. A pilot project is also under way, introducing a “routine enquiry” process about DV to GP surgeries and sexual health clinics. Work to introduce specialist domestic violence courts in Sussex continues. And Sussex police are currently seeking to bring the National Centre for Domestic Violence charity to Sussex. This charity works to deliver, on a next-day basis, the protection of civil orders to victims of domestic violence without any charge to the service or the victim.

Sussex police have been engaging with other partner agencies in introducing updated child protection and safeguarding procedures for Sussex. They are working with the East Sussex, West Sussex and Brighton and Hove city council local Safeguarding Children Boards, which provide information, advice and guidance for all professionals working in child protection. East Sussex is also one of the eight pilot counties for the development of Child Death Review Panels.

Neighbourhood policing across Sussex is continuing to develop, and practitioners are working up increasingly sophisticated strategies to engage with, and meet the needs of, local communities. Problem-solving with partners is becoming further established, with good use being made of analytical products to identify crime and incident hotspots. And improving community consultation is enabling neighbourhood specialist teams to tackle the problems of most concern to communities.

Crimes of Violence: West Midlands

Mr. Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps he is taking to reduce levels of violent crime in the West Midlands police authority area. [138779]

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 23 May 2007]: The Government are currently taking forward a wide range of work which will continue to reduce violent crime.
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We have, for example, recently passed the Violent Crime Reduction Act, which gives the police and local communities the powers they need to tackle guns, knives and alcohol-related violence.

Domestic violence is a particular priority. In December 2006, it was announced that Birmingham, Coventry, Dudley, Sandwell (Warley and West Bromwich magistrates courts), Solihull and Walsall (Walsall and Aldridge magistrates courts) had been selected as Specialist Domestic Violence Court areas. These specialist courts promote a joint approach to tackling domestic violence, with the police, crown prosecutors, magistrates, courts and the probation service working together with specialist support services for victims. Agencies collectively identify, track and risk assess domestic violence cases, and better share information so that more offenders are brought to justice, victims are protected and better supported, and further violence is prevented.

The Government, through the Government office for the west midlands, supports key partners in the statutory and voluntary sector in tackling gun crime and gang-related violence. For example, Birmingham Reducing Gang Violence has continued to be a focal point for activities and partnership work to reduce gun crime. It is chaired by the West Midlands police, and supported by a range of agencies and voluntary sector groups, including Birmingham city council, West Midlands Probation, Victim Support, Increase the Peace UK, Mothers in Pain and Street Pastors.

The West Midlands is also well represented in the Tackling Violent Crime Programme, through which the Home Office works intensively with practitioners in local areas with high levels of more serious violent crime, to support their efforts to reduce, in particular, alcohol-related crime and domestic violence, to improve police and other agencies' performance and partnership working, and to improve local strategies. Currently four West Midlands police basic command units are funded to utilise a variety of interventions, including the greater use of fixed penalty notices for alcohol-related offences, routine visits to “hotspot” licensed premises, and the use of bus and taxi marshals at peak times.

West Midlands police have also been particularly active over the past 12 months in addressing robbery. Three of the 28 areas nationally which became subject to special focus during the recent Robbery Initiative are in the West Midlands (Solihull, Wolverhampton and Coventry). These areas were required to produce an action plan, which would produce long-term, sustainable interventions and not rely purely on short-term police activity to yield short-term results.

Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994: Greater London

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many orders under section 60 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 were made in London in each of the last five years; which officer signed each order; what locality was specified by each order; and for what duration the order was enforced. [143066]


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Mr. Coaker: The Home Office does not hold the information requested about authorisations of the use of powers under section 60 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994. An authorisation is an operational matter for the police and I have therefore asked the Metropolitan Police Service to collate the information for me. I shall write to the hon. Member when that information is available.

Driving Offences: Insurance

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what discussions he has had with the police on the trend in incidences of staged and induced motor accident fraud along the M1 corridor; [144003]

(2) what discussions he has had with the Insurance Fraud Bureau on the subject of staged and induced motor accident fraud; [144004]

(3) what discussions he has had with the insurance industry on the subject of a national strategy to tackle staged and induced motor accidents. [144005]

Mr. Coaker: I have recently met with both Commissioner Bowron (City of London police) who is the ACPO lead for Economic Crime, and with representatives of the Association of British Insurers. At both of these meetings the issue of staged motor accident fraud was among the issues discussed.

The recent cross-Whitehall review of fraud recommended in favour of a national strategy on fraud, overseen by a National Fraud Strategic Authority. The review and its recommendations was not specific to insurance fraud but a national strategy would cover this type of fraud. Work on the fraud review recommendations is being taken forward through an overall Programme Board and a number of working groups which will produce detailed business cases and costings for the various groups of recommendations. The Home Office and the Association of British Insurers are both involved in this process.

Driving Under Influence

Mr. Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many drink driving tests were carried out by each police force in 2005. [143514]

Mr. Coaker: The information available relates to screening breath tests and is contained in the annual publication, Mooring Offences and Breath Test Statistics, England and Wales, available in the Library and at www. homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pubsstatistical.html. The latest figures are for 2004; figures for 2005 will be available later in 2007.

Mr. Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) drivers, (b) other road users and (c) pedestrians were killed in crashes involving drivers who had exceeded the alcohol limit in each of the last 10 years. [143566]

Dr. Ladyman: I have been asked to reply.

The available information is shown in the table.


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Estimated number of fatalities from accidents involving illegal alcohol levels, by road user type: GB 1995 - 2004
Estimated number of fatalities( 1)
Car drivers over limit Other car users( 2) Pedestrians Other road users( 3) Total

1995

230

180

30

100

540

1996

270

180

40

90

580

1997

240

160

30

120

550

1998

200

130

40

90

460

1999

230

130

20

80

460

2000

250

150

30

100

530

2001

260

130

40

100

530

2002

290

130

20

100

550

2003

260

160

30

120

580

2004

280

140

30

120

580

(1) Estimated figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
(2) Includes all car passengers, and car drivers who were not over the limit.
(3) Includes all road users except car occupants and pedestrians, including other motor vehicle drivers who were over the legal alcohol limit.

Drugs: Afghanistan

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what quantities of narcotics originating from Afghanistan were seized in transit by UK enforcement agencies in each of the last three years. [142993]

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 15 June 2007]: Since 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007, the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) has, with other partner law enforcement agencies, been involved in the seizure of 1.5 tonnes of heroin. While the source country has not been established, we believe that 90 per cent. of all heroin reaching the UK originates from Afghanistan.


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