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20 Jun 2007 : Column 1932W—continued


20 Jun 2007 : Column 1933W

Over the last 10 years, the main part of the Department's total expenditure on health research has been devolved to and managed by national health service organisations. Those organisations have since 2001-02 accounted for their use of the allocations they have received from the Department in an annual research and development report. The reports identify total, aggregated expenditure on a number of national priority areas, including cancer and coronary heart disease.

The Department does not routinely collect expenditure data at the level that would be required to answer the third part of the hon. Gentleman's question.

Details of individual projects supported in the NHS can be found on the national research register at www.dh.gov.uk/research.

£ million
Cancer( 1) Corona ry heart disease( 2)

1997-98

53

n/a

1998-99

75.4

n/a

1999-2000

77.4

n/a

2000-01

83.8

n/a

2001-02

113.4

n/a

2002-03

124.1

55

2003-04

139.8

53

2004-05

150.3

59

2005-06

168

59

n/a = not available (1) Spend as reported by national health service organisations and by the Department's national research programmes (2) Spend as reported by NHS organisations.


School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme: Pre-School Education

Mr. Todd: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she will extend the National School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme to children in (a) pre-school and nursery environments and (b) formal education beyond the age of six years. [144164]

Caroline Flint: The school fruit and vegetable scheme (SFVS) is a school-based scheme, which provides a free piece of fruit or vegetable every day to children aged four to six years (and any other children in the same class) attending a participating local education authority maintained infant, primary or special school.

In setting the eligibility criteria, we sought to draw the lines in a way which are fair and practical focusing on the first years of education in school The decision to base eligibility by class or school grouping and not strictly by age has the key benefit that all children in a class participate.

The SFVS is part of a wider strategy to improve children’s diets, supporting the improvements we are making to school food and the healthy eating theme of the healthy schools programme . We have no plans to extend the SFVS at present.

Sight Impaired: Lancashire

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in West Lancashire constituency were registered as blind in each year since 1997. [143523]


20 Jun 2007 : Column 1934W

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The information is not available in the requested format. Data are collected from councils with social services responsibilities and are not available at constituency level. The number of severely sight impaired people registered is collected every three years. The information for those registered as severely sight impaired in Lancashire county council and successor organisations since 1997 is shown in the following table.

N umber of people registered as severely sight impaired in Lancashire from 1997 to 2006
Rounded numbers
1997 2000 2003 2006

Lancashire(1)

5,100

5,050

5,070

4,910

Lancashire (remaining)

3,930

3,920

3,750

Blackburn and Darwen

570

550

530

Blackpool

540

600

640

(1) In 1997 Lancashire consisted of Lancashire, Blackburn and Darwen, and Blackpool. Figures have been provided on a consistent basis for comparison.
Notes:
These data are compiled from the triennial return SSDA 902 submitted by councils to the Information Centre for health and social care. There has been a change in the terminology of the registers, blind and partial sight should now be expressed as severely sight impaired (blind) and sight impaired (partially sighted).
Registration of blindness is voluntary. However, it is a pre-condition for the receipt of certain financial benefits. It is this factor which gives greater credibility to the “Register of the Severely Sight Impaired” than to the “Register of the Sight Impaired” and to other disability registration records maintained by councils, where the voluntary principle also applies. Registration is not, however, a pre-requisite for certain social services concessions and this factor, combined with uncertainties about the regularity with which the councils review and update their records, makes it difficult to assign a degree of reliability to either of these registers.
For people to be registered as severely or partially sight impaired they must first undergo an examination by a consultant ophthalmologist. The consultant records his or her findings on the Certificate of Visual Impairment (CVI) formerly the BD8, on which the consultant also certifies whether or not the person meets the statutory definition of blindness or the non-statutory definition of partial sight.
The statutory definition of blindness is that a person should be “so blind as to be unable to perform any work for which eyesight is essential”.

Smoking

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidelines have been issued on how funding allocated to local authorities for extra activity brought about by the smoking ban should be spent. [144172]

Caroline Flint: The anticipated costs and benefits of smoke-free legislation is set out in the Departments final Regulatory Impact Assessment published in December 2006. Copies are available in the Library.

I refer the hon. member to the answer given on 5 March 2007, Official Report, column 1698W for details on funding for local authorities.

The Government provide funding for local authorities’ new responsibilities to build compliance and, where necessary, enforce smoke-free legislation under the principles of the New Burdens Doctrine by way of a non-ringfenced grant. The grant has been
20 Jun 2007 : Column 1935W
made in line with the Government’s commitment to provide freedom for local authorities in the allocation of their budgets.

South Warwickshire General Hospitals NHS Trust: Finance

Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what level of (a) weighted and (b) unweighted funding per patient (i) South Warwickshire General Hospitals NHS Trust and (ii) Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals NHS Trust received in the last year for which figures are available. [144083]

Andy Burnham: The Department makes revenue allocations to primary care trusts (PCTs), but not to national health service trusts. South Warwickshire General Hospitals NHS Trust is in Warwickshire PCT and Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals NHS Trust is in Oxfordshire PCT. The weighted and unweighted revenue allocations per head of population for Warwickshire PCT and Oxfordshire PCT in 2007-08 are provided, therefore, in the following table.

2007-08
Allocation per unweighted head (£) Allocation per weighted head (£)

Warwickshire PCT

1,241

1,355

Oxfordshire PCT

1,171

1,389


Standards: Pharmacy

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many medicine use reviews were undertaken in each of the last 10 years, broken down by primary care trust. [142487]

Caroline Flint: Medicine use reviews (MURs) were introduced on 1 April 2005 as an advanced service within the new contractual framework for community pharmacy, provided by accredited pharmacists in premises that had been accredited. Data on the number of MURs that pharmacists provided in the first year of the schemes operation, April 2005 to March 2006, were published in table 10 of the bulletin “General Pharmaceutical Services in England and Wales 1996-97 to 2005-06” published by the Information Centre for health and social care in 2006. A copy is available in the Library. Similar data for the period April 2006 to March 2007 will be published later this year. An advance copy is being placed in the Library. The total number of MURs for 2005-06 and 2006-07 were 150,000 and 560,000 respectively.

Tomography: Waiting Lists

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average waiting time was for patients to receive (a) CT, (b) MRI and (c) PET scans in each year since 2000, broken down by health authority. [142978]

Andy Burnham: Collection of data on waiting times for 15 key diagnostic tests began in 2006. Median
20 Jun 2007 : Column 1936W
waiting times for MRI and CT scans in April 2006 and April 2007 are shown in the table. The heading CT includes PET CT.

Commissioner based median waiting times (weeks) for MRI and CT scans
Test
MRI CT
Strategic health authority April 2006 April 2007 April 2006 April 2007

North East

5.7

3.1

2.3

1.6

North West

5.3

4.1

3.1

2.1

Yorks and the Humber

5.4

3.5

2.6

1.7

East Midlands

4.1

2.9

1.8

1.6

West Midlands

4.5

3.0

2.2

1.5

East of England

5.2

4.0

2.7

1.9

London

6.2

4.3

2.9

2.2

South East Coast

6.3

3.7

3.0

1.8

South Central

5.4

3.0

3.0

1.9

South West

5.8

3.9

3.3

1.9

Source:
Department of Health, DM01

Vaccinations: Side Effects

Ian Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for how many past years her Department holds records of numbers of (a) reported adverse reactions to vaccines and (b) deaths attributed to vaccinations. [143200]

Caroline Flint: The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (formally known as the Medicines Control Agency, and previously the Medicines Division of the Department of Health) has been collecting reports of suspected adverse reactions (ADRs) to medicines and vaccines and any deaths associated with them for 43 years via the Yellow Card Scheme. The scheme records information from health care professionals and patients with a suspicion that an ADR may be related to a drug or vaccine, and has been in operation since 1964.

CJD: Blood

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many blood samples from haemophiliacs have been made available to the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control for research into prototype vCJD blood tests; on what dates such samples were made available; and if she will make a statement. [142986]

Caroline Flint: None.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many samples of blood from haemophiliacs are being used in research to test for vCJD; and if she will make a statement. [142987]

Caroline Flint: We are not aware of any blood samples from haemophiliacs currently in such use. No
20 Jun 2007 : Column 1937W
samples would be used without ensuring compliance with appropriate ethical and legal processes.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she will list the batches of blood products administered to patients in the UK that are known to be at risk from vCJD contamination; and if she will make a statement. [142988]

Caroline Flint: In September 2004 selected groups of patients were informed about the results of a risk assessment exercise for blood plasma products, undertaken by the Health Protection Agency. As part of this exercise, the batch numbers for plasma products implicated with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease were sent to national health service trusts, primary care trusts and to the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors Organisation.


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