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21 Jun 2007 : Column 2022W—continued


The figures shown in the following table are taken from the new Dedicated Schools Grant and are in cash terms. They are not comparable with those for the earlier years. The DSG is a mechanism for distributing funding and does not include a primary/secondary split. The figures are for all funded pupils aged three to 15. The Department will be announcing DSG figures for 2007-08 shortly.

2005-06 baseline 2006-07

Cornwall

3,150

3,362

South West

3,196

3,411

England

3,411

3,643

Notes:
1. The revenue funding per pupil figures only run to 2005-06 because it is not possible to provide a consistent time series beyond that year as the introduction of the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) in 2006-07 fundamentally changed how local authorities are funded. The 1997-98 to 2005-06 figures are based on education formula spending (EPS) which formed the education part of the local government finance settlement, plus various grants. This was an assessment of what local authorities needed to fund education rather than what they spent. In 2006-07 funding for schools changed with the introduction of the DSG which is based largely on an authority's previous spending.
2. The DSG has a different coverage to EFS: EFS comprised a schools block and an LEA block (to cover LEA central functions) whereas DSG only covers the school block. LEA block items are still funded through DCLG’s Local Government Finance Settlement but education items cannot be separately identified. This means we have a break in our time series as the two sets of data are not comparable, an alternative time series is currently under development.
3. To provide a comparison for 2006-07 DSG, we have isolated the schools block equivalent funding in 2005-06; as described above this does not represent the totality of ‘education’ funding in that year. There are other grants that support the schools budget, these are not included in the provided DSG figures.

Pupils: Vocational Guidance

Mr. Boris Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if he will make a statement on the provision of careers advice for (a) secondary school
21 Jun 2007 : Column 2023W
and (b) post-16 pupils; what steps his Department takes to ensure that provision is met; and what requirement there is for such provision to be inspected. [142976]

Jim Knight: Under section 114 of the Learning and Skills Act 2000, the Secretary of State has the power to provide or secure the provision of services which he thinks will encourage, enable or assist (directly or indirectly) effective participation by young people in education or training. This power is discharged through the Connexions service who provide careers advice (among a wider range of services designed to improve levels of participation in education and training) to young people aged 13 to 19.

Additionally, all maintained schools have a statutory duty to provide a planned programme of careers education from years 7 to 11. How schools deliver this requirement is up to the individual school, although the DfES provides a non-statutory framework as a guide. There are no statutory duties on providers of post-16 learning to provide a programme of careers education.

From April 2008, local authorities will have responsibility for the provision of Connexions services.

Connexions services are within the scope of annual performance assessments and joint area reviews of children’s services, led by Ofsted.

Mr. Boris Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what records his Department has of the numbers of young people in secondary schools in England who accessed careers advisers in each of the last three years. [142989]

Jim Knight: Personal advisers in the Connexions service provide information, advice and guidance to young people on a range of issues. Information on these interventions is collected centrally, but we do not collect information specifically relating to careers advice given in schools.

Qualifications: Greater London

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many pupils obtained (a) no, (b) one, (c) two, (d) three and (e) four GCSEs at grades A*-C in English in (i) England, (ii) each region and (iii) each London borough in each of the last five years; [132137]

(2) how many pupils obtained (a) five, (b) six, (c) seven, (d) eight and (e) nine GCSEs at grades A* to C including English in (i) England, (ii) each region and (iii) each London borough in each of the last five years. [132174]

Jim Knight: The information requested has been placed in the House Library.

Reading: Mentors

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills pursuant to the answer of 6 June 2007, Official Report, column 508W, on reading: mentors, (1) whether it is part of the role of paid support staff acting as learning mentors in schools to provide intensive or one-to-one tuition in mathematics; [144446]


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(2) what qualifications paid support staff acting as learning mentors in schools are required to have. [144447]

Jim Knight: Mentors can be used to offer specific support in mathematics as well as offering a wider role in supporting children as learners across a range of subjects. Support of a one-to-one type is more often undertaken by a teaching assistant who, working with the teacher, would identify the specific learning needs of the child. This one-to-one support is a mix of in-class support and out of class focused work.

There are no specific qualifications that support staff acting as learning mentors in schools are required to have. It is for individual head teachers to assess and decide whether staff have the necessary skills and experience to carry out the role and whether they need to access the range of training and support opportunities that exist for support staff acting as mentors.

School Leaving: Qualifications

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many pupils leaving school at 16 there were without (a) five GCSEs at A-C, (b) five GCSEs at A-E and (c) GCSEs in (i) 2006 and (ii) 2005. [143138]

Jim Knight: The answer to parts (a) and (c) is given as follows:

Number of 15-year-old pupils( 1) who did not achieve the above indicators in 2005 and 2006:
2005 2006

Number of 15-year-old pupils(1)

636,771

648,043

Number of 15-year-old pupils(1) who did not achieve 5+ GCSEs at Grades A*-C

278,173

268,366

Percentage of 15-year-olds pupils(1) who did not achieve 5+ GCSEs at Grades A*-C

43.7

41.4

Number of 15-year-old pupils(1) who did not achieve any qualifications

23,196

20,398

Percentage of 15-year old pupils(1) who did not achieve any qualifications

3.6

3.1

(1) Aged 15 at the beginning of the academic year, i.e. 31 August
Source:
School Achievement and Attainment Tables

The answer to part (b) can be provided only at a disproportionate cost.

Schools: Admissions

Mr. Paice: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many appeals were lodged by parents against non-admission of their children to (a) maintained primary schools and (b) maintained secondary schools by Cambridgeshire local education authority in each of the last 10 years; and how many were successful. [142513]

Jim Knight: The requested information is shown in the following table:


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21 Jun 2007 : Column 2026W
Appeals lodged by parents against non-admission of their children to maintained primary and secondary schools: Position in each year 1996/97 to 2005/06: Cambridgeshire local authority
1996/97( 1) 1997 / 98( 2) 1998/99 1999/2000 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06

Primary

Admission appeals lodged by parents

178

94

111

196

235

194

112

116

139

151

Appeals heard by an appeals panel

142

77

99

143

181

147

77

88

102

116

Appeals decided in parents’ favour

83

59

71

79

108

93

36

63

52

65

Secondary

Admission appeals lodged by parents

335

164

266

366

269

287

265

182

206

223

Appeals heard by an appeals panel

312

134

251

294

194

231

202

144

177

189

Appeals decided in parents’ favour

208

108

138

180

123

138

87

75

125

111

(1 )Includes Peterborough local authority as before local government reorganisation (LGR).
(2) From 1 April 1998 : It is expected that the majority of appeals for the 1997/98 academic year will have been lodged prior to April 1998. In some cases these figures
are either included in the original authority totals or were not available.

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) what estimate he has made of the total number of places in schools in each year to 2025; [143323]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of surplus places in schools in each year to 2025. [143325]

Jim Knight: The responsibility in law to plan school places is placed on local authorities. Local authorities are expected to take robust measures to remove surplus places and ensure that school places are where parents want them.

The Department collects data on the number of school places and numbers of pupils on roll on a school by school basis, together with LA wide pupil projections via an annual survey. The Department does not collect projections of the capacity of schools or the numbers of school places from local authorities.

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of pupils in full-time education in each year to 2015. [143324]

Jim Knight: The Department’s estimates for the number of pupils in full-time education in schools in England are shown as follows:

Projected numbers of pupils( 1) in all schools
Thousand
As at January each year 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

All Maintained Schools(2)

7,383

7,300

7,208

7,157

7,076

Non-Maintained Special Schools

5

5

4

4

4

Academies(3)

45

80

134

162

220

City Technology Colleges

11

5

3

3

3

Independent Schools

566

564

561

559

556

All schools

8,010

7,953

7,911

7,885

7,860

(1) Full-time equivalents, counting each part-time pupil as 0.5. The numbers have been rounded to the nearest thousand.
(2) Pupil numbers in maintained schools includes those in nursery, primary, secondary (including pupils in sixth forms in secondary schools), maintained special schools and maintained Pupil Referral Units.
(3) Projections are based on a target of 200 academies by 2011.

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