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(5) what additional equipment would be needed to enforce the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill if passed into law as it stands following Second Reading; and what estimate he has made of the likely cost; [144410]

(6) what additional training will be needed to enforce the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill if passed into law as it stands following Second Reading; and what estimate he has made of the likely cost; [144411]

(7) what assessment he has made of the possible overall impact of the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill on his Department and its agencies should it be passed into law as it stands following Second Reading. [144412]

Dr. Ladyman: It is estimated that around 230 additional staff would be required for DfT and its Agencies.

The overall cost to implement the Bill as drafted has been estimated as approximately £80 million over three years.

The costs required for advertising have not yet been estimated.

No estimate has been made of the likely levels of non-compliance.

It has not been established whether additional equipment would be required.

The estimated cost of enforcement is £50 million over two years.

The estimated cost to this Department and its Agencies is £30 million over three years.

Mr. Paterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of which programmes managed by his Department and its agencies would have to be delayed or postponed should the Off Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill pass into law as it stands following Second Reading; what estimate he has made of the cost of such delays; and if he will make a statement. [144413]

Dr. Ladyman: No formal assessment has yet been made, but it is likely that the proposals would require significant additional changes to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency’s (DVLA’s) IT systems and processes. This would be likely to have an adverse impact on other DVLA IT programmes and hence on the quality of services to the public. It is likely that one of the projects that would be rescheduled would be the delivery of continuous insurance enforcement.

Mr. Paterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what recent discussions he has had with the First Minister for Northern Ireland on the possible implications of the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill if enacted; [144318]

(2) what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland on the possible implications of the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill if enacted; [144325]

(3) what recent discussions he has had with (a) the Secretary of State for Scotland and (b) the First Minister for Scotland on the possible implications of the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill if enacted. [144326]


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Dr. Ladyman: No discussions on the implications of the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill have taken place with the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, the First Minister for Northern Ireland, the Secretary of State for Scotland or the First Minister for Scotland.

Mr. Paterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what assessment he has made of the possible impact on the rural and farming community of the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill if enacted in its current form; [144338]

(2) what assessment he has made of the possible impact on the agricultural industry of the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill if enacted in its current form; [144339]

(3) what assessment he has made of the possible impact on motorcycle sport of the Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill if enacted in its current form. [144340]

Dr. Ladyman: The Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill has been interpreted as making provisions which would apply to certain vehicles used in rural areas for agriculture and forestry, and vehicles used for motor sport. No detailed assessments have yet been made, but it is clear that, in its current form, the Bill would
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require many such vehicles to be registered and to display a registration number.

Railways: Northern Region

Chris Grayling: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many Sprinter trains are in use on the Northern Rail franchise; and what the average age is of the Sprinter fleet. [144833]

Mr. Tom Harris: The Northern franchise currently has 40 Class 150 Sprinter units in use, each comprised of two vehicles. The Class 150s were built between 1984 and 1987.

Roads: Accidents

Anne Milton: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate his Department has made of the number of children (a) killed and (b) seriously injured on the road in each year since 1997 during their journey to and from school when travelling (i) on foot, (ii) by bicycle and (iii) in vehicles; what estimate he has made of the number who were within 300 metres of their home in each case; and if he will make a statement. [144156]

Dr. Ladyman: The information requested is given in the following table.

Number of children (aged 0-15) killed or seriously injured in reported personal injury road accidents, on the way to or from school, GB: 1997 to 2005
Number of casualties
Pedestrian Pedal cyclist Other vehicles Total
Killed Serious Killed Serious Killed Serious Killed Serious

1997

22

934

3

99

0

101

25

1,134

1998

15

847

3

108

7

135

25

1,090

1999

16

765

3

113

3

108

22

986

2000

19

762

2

64

3

81

24

907

2001

16

722

0

53

5

60

21

835

2002

8

718

3

64

2

81

13

863

2003

11

521

1

44

1

41

13

606

2004

10

502

2

35

2

53

14

590

2005

6

448

1

51

4

45

11

544


2005 is the latest year for which figures are available. No estimates are available of the number of children injured within 300 metres of their home.

Mr. Paterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) how many (a) road traffic accidents (RTAs) and (b) RTAs involving serious injury or fatalities were recorded in each year since 1997 in which mechanical failure or defects, including tyres, have been identified as the cause or a contributory factor; [145152]

(2) what types of defects detectable during the MOT test have led to serious and fatal accidents in each year since 1997. [145157]

Dr. Ladyman: Comprehensive information on what types of defects detectable during the MOT test have led to serious and fatal accidents is not available.

From 2005 information has been collected on contributory factors to reported personal injury road accidents, including vehicle defects. These are “tyres illegal, defective or under inflated”, “defective lights or indicators”, “defective brakes”, “defective steering or suspension”, “defective or missing mirrors” and “overloaded or poorly loaded vehicle or trailer”. This Information is published on the Department’s website at the following web addresses:

Traffic Lights: Cameras

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment was made of the merits of requiring traffic light cameras to be brightly painted when the decision was taken to make that a requirement for fixed speed cameras; and if he will make a statement. [144138]

Dr. Ladyman: No assessment was made. Traffic light signals are, by their very nature, highly visible so it is
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unnecessary to require any cameras monitoring them to be brightly painted. Traffic light signals monitored by cameras are however clearly signed in advance.

Transport: Costs

Mr. Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate he has made of the percentage change in real terms of the cost of travelling by (a) private car, (b) bus and (c) train since 1997. [142517]

Gillian Merron: Between 1997 and 2006 the real cost of motoring declined by 10.2 per cent. bus and coach fares increased by 12.6 per cent. and rail fares increased by 5.9 per cent.

West Coast Railway Line

Mr. Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) how many instances of serious safety lapses have occurred on the West Coast mainline since the Grayrigg derailment on 23 February; [144370]

(2) how many instances of serious safety lapses have occurred on the Cumbrian section of the West Coast mainline since the Grayrigg derailment on 23 February; [144371]

(3) if he will make a statement on Network Rail’s initial report into the Grayrigg derailment; [144372]

(4) what inspection regime is used for checking the condition of the rail line on the Cumbrian section of the West Coast mainline; [144373]

(5) what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the number of staff employed in the maintenance of the Cumbrian section of the West Coast mainline; [144374]

(6) what additional checks have been introduced on the Cumbrian section of the West Coast Main Line since the Grayrigg derailment on 23 February; [144377]

(7) whether there is to be a review of the speed limits in operation on the Cumbrian section of the West Coast Main Line; [144378]

(8) what assessment he has made of the impact on scheduled journey times of additional checks being carried out on the Cumbrian section of the West Coast Main Line. [144379]

Mr. Tom Harris: The Grayrigg derailment is being investigated by the Rail Accident Investigation branch (RAIB), which will in accordance with its regulations, make its report public in the shortest possible time commensurate with a thorough investigation. The RAIB’s investigations covers a broad range of issues but includes the maintenance regime and related staff resources; and any internal reports produced by Network Rail will be considered by RAIB as part of its investigations.

When RAIB’s detailed findings are available, Network Rail will consider them carefully and any action which may need to be taken.

The inspection regime to check the condition of the track (including any additional checks) is an operational matter for Network Rail. It falls to the rail industry to agree the speed limits and journey times on the line. Network Rail’s arrangements are subject to independent scrutiny.


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Mr. Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he expects the full report on the inquiry into the Grayrigg derailment to be published. [144375]

Mr. Tom Harris: The investigation by the rail accident investigation branch (RAIB) is continuing and the RAIB will, in accordance with its regulations, make its report public in the shortest possible time commensurate with a thorough investigation.

Justice

Burglary: Sentencing

David T.C. Davies: To ask the Minister of State, Ministry of Justice how many mandatory sentences were handed down to burglars in each year since 1997. [144136]

Mr. Hanson: The following table shows the information reported to the Ministry of Justice, previously Home Office, Court Proceedings Database on persons sentenced under section 111 of the Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000 (previously section 4 of the Crime (Sentences) Act 1997) in England and Wales for a third offence of domestic burglary in the years 2000 to 2005. Data are not available before 2000, as the Crown court computer system was not updated to recognise these sentences until then.

The data are published in table 2.6 of the Statistical Bulletin, “Sentencing Statistics 2005”. It can be located at the following:

Persons sentenced under the Powers of the Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000, 2000-05: England and Wales
Number of persons
Section 111 (Minimum three years for third domestic burglary)

2000

2001

6

2002

2

2003

13

2004

46

2005

89


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