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5 July 2007 : Column 1120W—continued

Post Offices: Stafford

Mr. Kidney: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how many representations Post Office Ltd. received in response to its consultation on the moving of the Stafford Crown Post Office to WH Smith; and how many of the responses raised problems about access. [147714]

Mr. McFadden: This is an operational matter for Post Office Ltd. Alan Cook, the Managing Director has been asked to reply direct to my hon. Friend.

Postal Services: Buses

Charles Hendry: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how much subsidy was provided by local authorities for Postbus services in the last year for which figures are available. [146842]

Mr. McFadden [holding answer 2 July 2007]: It is entirely a matter for individual authorities to decide any subsidy for Postbus services. I understand that the amount of subsidy provided by local authorities to support the Postbus service for the year ending 2006-07 was £442,000.

Power Stations: Peterhead

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform, pursuant to the answer of 25 June 2007, Official Report, column
5 July 2007 : Column 1121W
144W, on Power Stations: Peterhead, what additional sequestration projects might be approved in the next (a) three months and (b) six months. [147821]

Malcolm Wicks: None. Any projects which go ahead following the competition to build the UK’s first commercial-scale demonstration of Carbon Capture and Storage, announced in Budget 2007, will have to satisfy the relevant regulatory, planning and environmental requirements. In addition, the Energy White Paper committed Government to consult on what their power station consents policy should be with regard to carbon-capture readiness by the end of the year.

Productivity

Andrew Selous: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what steps he plans to take to improve UK productivity over the next 12 months. [147652]

Mr. McFadden: Over the past decade the Government have placed the objective of improving the UK’s productivity performance at the heart of economic strategy and the policy agenda, which has successfully narrowed the productivity gap with our major industrial competitors.

Going forward, a wide programme of reforms has been designed under the Government’s framework of five drivers of productivity in order to make further progress. My Department contributes to policies under all five drivers of productivity, but has particular responsibility for taking forward reforms under the enterprise and competition drivers. For example, under the enterprise driver, ongoing work on the Better Regulation Agenda and the Simplification programme, which my Department is leading, will help to create a better framework within which business can operate. Implementing the provisions of the Companies Act 2006 which received Royal Assent last year will also contribute to reducing the administrative burdens on business, and at the same time, increase transparency and improve confidence of investors in the UK economy.

We will work closely with other Departments to take forward the productivity agenda.

Safety: Furniture

Mr. Baron: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what measures the Government are taking to stop sofas and chairs which do not meet the fire safety regulations from being imported into the UK. [146802]

Mr. Timms: Liaison between local authority Trading Standards officers and HM Revenue and Customs on furniture imports has resulted in furniture being detained and convictions obtained for non-compliance with the Furniture and Furnishings (Fire) (Safety) Regulations 1988. HM Customs issued an Intelligence Trend Alert in December 2006 to its detection enforcement staff to raise their awareness of the potential risks posed to the public by sofas consigned from Poland. Also, officials from my Department have twice visited Poland to increase awareness of the FFRs and the Polish embassy has written to Polish manufacturers to do the same.


5 July 2007 : Column 1122W

Children, Schools and Families

Babies: Children in Care

John Hemming: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what representations he has received on the number of newborn babies taken into care in North Tyneside in the last three months; and if he will make a statement. [147589]

Kevin Brennan: The Department has received no representations regarding the number of newborn babies taken into care in North Tyneside in the last three months.

Children: Protection

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many children in Key Stages 3 and 4 were classified as (a) at risk and (b) in need in each of the last five years; [147615]

(2) how many young people in post-compulsory education aged 16 to 18 years were classified as (a) at risk and (b) in need in each of the last five years; [147616]

(3) how many children of primary school age were classified as (a) at risk and (b) in need in each of the last five years. [147617]

Beverley Hughes [holding answer 4 July 2007]: The available data are shown in the tables.

Table 1 provides information about the number of children in need who received a service during the children in need census weeks in February 2003 and February 2005 in England.

Table 2 provides information on the number of children and young people on the child protection register in England in the last five years by age.

The majority of children in need do not enter the child protection system so the figures shown in Table 2 represent a subset of those children in Table 1.

Table 1: Children in need who received a service during the census week in February 2003 and February 2005( 1, 2) —England
Age during the February census week
Number Under 1 1-4 5-9 10-15 16 and over

2005

234,700

14,400

44,200

52,300

83,100

40,700

2003(3)

226,700

12,900

47,400

50,500

78,400

37,500

(1 )Children upon whom the local authorities expended resources, either in terms of costed staff or centre time, or in terms of payments for placements or other services received by the child, including one-off payments.
(2) Children are looked after by social services or supported in families and independently.
(3) Includes estimates for four local authorities who did not return data.

Table 2: Children on the child protection register at 31 March each year, by age—England
Age as at 31 March
Number( 1) under 1 1-4 5-9 10-15 16 and over

2006

26,400

3,000

7,600

7,600

7,300

490

2005

25,900

3,000

7,400

7,400

7,300

490

2004

26,300

2,900

7,300

7,600

7,600

490

2003

26,600

2,800

7,600

7,700

7,600

510

2002

25,700

2,600

7,500

7,600

7,200

520

(1 )Includes unborn children.

5 July 2007 : Column 1123W

The latest figures on children and young people on the child protection register were published in a Statistical First Release (SFR) 45/2006 “Referrals, assessments and children and young people on child protection registers, England—year ending 31 March 2006” on 16 November 2006. A copy of this release is available on my Department’s website:

Figures on children in need for 2003 and 2005 were published in Statistical Volumes in February 2004 and March 2006, respectively; and are also available on the Department’s website.

Departments: Sick Leave

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many staff in his Department have taken (a) five or more, (b) four, (c) three and (d) two periods of sick leave of less than five days in the last 12 months. [147058]

Kevin Brennan: The information for the period April 2006 to March 2007, for the former Department for Education and Skills is set out in the following table.

Periods of sick leave less than 5 days Number of staff

5 or more

141

4

132

3

231

2

439


The Department has agreed year on year sickness absence targets with Cabinet Office. Our ultimate goal
5 July 2007 : Column 1124W
is to reduce sickness absence levels to seven days per full-time equivalent member of staff by 2010.

Physical Education

Hugh Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families who is responsible for workforce development on physical education and sport; and if he will make a statement. [147265]

Jim Knight [holding answer 3 July 2007]: The Training and Development Agency for Schools has a remit to support the continuing professional development of teachers. Funding for this area is devolved to schools, which are best placed to decide what activities meet the needs of the school and the individual teachers working there. Additional support is available through the PE and School Sport Professional Development Programme which allows schools to draw, free of charge, from a menu of resources to help teachers raise the quality of the PE and school sport they provide.

Primary Education

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many children who moved from primary school to secondary school attained an average of level 4 or below at key stage 2 in each year since 1997. [146122]

Jim Knight [holding answer 28 June 2007]: The information is shown in the following table.


5 July 2007 : Column 1125W

5 July 2007 : Column 1126W
Key stage 2 test levels of attainment by subject, 1995 to 20061
Percentage of pupils at each level Percentage at level:
A T/D B N W( 1) 1( 2) 2 3 4 5 6( 2) Total 4 or above 5 or above

English

1995

4

0

0

0

1

7

39

41

7

0

100

49

7

1996

3

0

2

0

1

6

30

45

12

0

100

57

12

1997

3

0

4

2

1

26

48

16

0

100

63

16

1998

2

0

4

2

1

26

48

17

0

100

65

17

1999

2

0

3

2

1

20

48

22

0

100

71

22

2000

2

0

3

2

1

17

46

29

0

100

75

29

2001

1

1

3

2

1

17

46

29

0

100

75

29

2002

1

1

3

2

1

17

46

29

0

100

75

29

2003

1

1

3

2

1

16

48

27

100

75

27

2004

1

0

4

2

1

14

50

27

100

78

27

2005

1

0

4

2

1

14

52

27

100

79

27

2006

1

0

4

1

1

14

47

32

100

79

32

Mathematics

1995

4

0

5

0

1

7

37

32

12

0

100

45

13

1996

3

0

2

0

1

5

34

40

14

0

100

54

14

1997

3

0

3

2

2

28

44

18

0

100

62

18

1998

2

0

3

3

1

31

42

17

0

100

59

17

1999

2

0

3

2

1

23

45

24

0

100

69

24

2000

2

0

3

2

1

21

47

24

0

100

72

25

2001

1

0

2

2

1

22

45

25

0

100

71

25

2002

1

1

2

2

1

20

46

27

0

100

73

28

2003

1

1

3

2

1

19

44

29

100

73

29

2004

1

0

3

2

1

19

43

31

100

74

31

2005

1

0

3

2

1

18

44

31

100

75

31

2006

1

0

3

2

1

17

43

33

100

76

33

Science

1995

5

0

2

0

0

4

19

48

22

0

100

70

22

1996

4

0

1

0

0

4

28

48

14

0

100

62

14

1997

3

0

2

1

1

23

50

18

0

100

69

19

1998

3

0

2

1

1

23

53

16

0

100

69

16

1999

2

0

2

1

0

16

51

27

0

100

78

27

2000

2

0

2

1

0

11

50

34

0

100

85

34

2001

2

0

1

0

0

9

53

34

0

100

87

34

2002

1

1

1

0

0

9

49

38

0

100

86

38

2003

1

0

2

0

0

10

46

41

100

87

41

2004

1

0

2

1

0

10

43

43

100

86

43

2005

1

0

2

1

0

10

40

47

100

86

47

2006

1

0

2

1

0

10

41

46

100

87

46

(1) Figures for 2006 are based on revised data. Figures for all other years are based on final data
(2) Levels W and 1 were valid in 1995 and 1996 only. Level 6 was valid from 1995 to 2002 only.
‘A’ represents pupils who were absent.
‘T’ represents pupils working at the level of the assessment but unable to access the test.
‘D’ represents pupils disapplied from teacher assessment.
‘B’ represents pupils who were working below the level of the test.
‘N’ represents pupils who took the tests but failed to register a level.
‘W’ represents pupils who are “working towards” level 1 but have not yet achieved the standards needed for level 1.

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