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23 July 2007 : Column 878W—continued


School Leaving

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what his estimate is of the cost to the Exchequer in (a) 2007-08, (b) 2008-09, (c) 2009-10, (d) 2010-11 and (e) 2011-12 of raising the education leaving age to 18 years; and if he will make a statement. [149894]

Jim Knight: We plan to raise the participation age to 17 from September 2013 and 18 from September 2015. This will not involve additional costs over current plans in 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10. We estimate that it will incur additional capital costs of £28.2 million in 2010-11 and £19.7 million in 2011-12, and additional training costs of £0.2 million in 2010-11 and £0.5 million in 2011-12.

School Meals

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of the number and proportion of English school pupils taking (a) hot and (b) cold school lunches in each reporting period in each year since 1990-91; and if he will make a statement. [150671]

Kevin Brennan: The Department does not collect data about the number and proportion of English school pupils taking hot and cold school lunches.

There is no requirement on authorities or schools to provide a hot school lunch. However, most authorities do offer pupils a hot meal and the transitional funding for school food we are providing authorities between 2005 and 2008 (£220 million for 05-08) is conditional upon local authorities developing plans to begin the reintroduction of hot meals by 2008.

Schools: Aerials

Mr. Rob Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many mobile telephone masts in each local education authority area are sited (a) on and (b) within one mile of (i) primary and (ii) secondary school property. [151157]

Jim Knight: We do not hold this information but there is a website(1) operated by the Office of Communications that gives information on the location and operating characteristics of all mobile phone base stations in the United Kingdom.

Schools: Construction

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many new schools were established in England in each year since 1980-81. [150702]

Jim Knight: The number of schools opened in England between 1980 and 2007 are given in the following table. To date, there are some 52 schools proposed to open in 2008, though, of course, this figure is subject to change.

It must be noted that, prior to 2002, school details were recorded on three separate databases which did not demand school opening dates. Therefore, while the figures given are correct as recorded, they should be viewed within this context.


23 July 2007 : Column 879W
Numbers of schools opened between 1980 and 2007
Year of opening Number opened

1980

(1)

1981

(1)

1982

(1)

1983

(1)

1984

(1)

1985

(1)

1986

(1)

1987

(1)

1988

1

1989

1

1990

1

1991

6

1992

6

1993

2

1994

1

1995

48

1996

136

1997

76

1998

86

1999

133

2000

124

2001

153

2002

118

2003

126

2004

129

2005

128

2006

138

2007

186

Total

1,599

(1) No data
Source:
EduBase

The figures include schools that opened as a result of the amalgamation or merger of two or more schools; schools that have closed but reopened as voluntary schools with a religious character; and schools that have opened in local authorities that have moved from a three-tier to a two-tier system.

Mr. Rob Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many schools in each local education authority (a) have been built since 1997 and (b) are planned to be built; [151224]

(2) how many schools in each local education authority have been built since the Education and Inspections Act 2006 came into force; and how many plans for new schools to be built have been drawn up since then; [151225]

(3) what percentage of schools that decided to rebuild at least 70 per cent. or more of their existing floor space were rebuilt with private finance initiative funding in each of the last 10 years, broken down by local education authority; [151462]

(4) which local education authorities have made plans to rebuild less than 70 per cent. of their floor space of schools since 1997; [151526]

(5) what percentage of the schools which have decided to rebuild less than 70 per cent. of existing floor space of schools since 1997 was funded by (a) a design and build conventional capital and (b) private finance initiative funding; [151533]

(6) how many local education authorities have made plans to rebuild at least 70 per cent. or more of the existing floor space of a school since 1997, broken down by local education authority. [151535]


23 July 2007 : Column 880W

Jim Knight: We hold only some of this information centrally.

Earlier this year we collected data from all education authorities on their schools building investment. This includes, for instance, the number of new schools built each year over the past 10 years, either as additional schools or as replacement of existing schools, by each authority. This is the one area where the data we hold relate directly to one of these questions.

The data also include the numbers of schools where authorities have renewed over 80 per cent. of the floor area of schools, and where they have renewed from 50 per cent. to 80 per cent. This information is available in the House Library.

The information we requested was on completed projects, not on local authorities’ plans.

Schools: Finance

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what discretionary funding schemes there are for schools administered by his Department; what the (a) purpose and (b) cost of the scheme was in each case in each year since 2004-05; what the budget is for each in each year to 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [150672]

Jim Knight: Information has been placed in the House Libraries detailing which specific grants were allocated to local authorities for schools or to support schools and pupils, for each year, between 2004-05 and 2007-08. The grants are in addition to the main funding for schools, provided though the local government finance system up to 2005-06 and the Dedicated Schools Grant since 2006-07. With the exception of the Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant, recurrent grants that are devolved to schools are not ring-fenced at school level.

DCSF is still agreeing the exact split of budgets with DIUS so it is not possible to give details of funding from 2008-11 at this moment. We will announce these in the autumn. The spending review settlement provided for a significant increase in DfES funding over the next three years to reach £75.5 billion by 2010-11, approximately £11 billion higher than in 2007-08.

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what proportion of schools funding is distributed without reference to pupil numbers; and if he will make a statement. [150703]

Jim Knight: The core funding for schools is delivered through the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) which was introduced in 2006-07 following two public consultations in 2005. The DSG was £28 billion in 2007-08 and all of this was distributed with reference to pupil numbers.

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what schemes will be funded in 2008-09 with the (a) Standards Fund, (b) School Standard Grant, (c) Information and Communications Technology Scheme and (d) academics and specialist schools budget. [150889]


23 July 2007 : Column 881W

Jim Knight: DCSF is still agreeing the exact split of budgets with DIUS so it is not possible to give details of funding from 2008-11 at this moment. The spending review settlement provided for a significant increase in DFES funding over the next three years to reach £75.5 billion by 2010-11, approximately £11 billion higher than in 2007-08. Details of specific schemes will be announced in the autumn.

Schools: Governing Bodies

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what plans he has to increase the representation of parents on school organisation committees; and if he will make a statement. [150690]

Jim Knight: School Organisation Committees were abolished by section 29 of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 which came into force on 25 May 2007.

Under new decision-making arrangements introduced from this date, decisions on statutory proposals to make changes to local school organisation are normally decided by local authorities, except for proposals for a new school where the local authority is the proposer or has a role in the trust of a proposed trust school. Such new school proposals are decided by the schools adjudicator. Other proposals may be decided by the schools adjudicator if the local authority fails to decide proposals within two months or following an appeal by the bodies for which there is explicit provision in the relevant legislation. Statutory guidance to local authorities and the schools adjudicator makes clear that they should have regard to the views of parents when considering proposals.

Schools: Human Rights

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many schools have adopted UNICEF's Rights Respecting Schools Programme; and if he will list them; [150345]

(2) what his policy is on promoting UNICEF's Rights Respecting Schools Programme; [150346]

(3) what assessment he has made of the effect of UNICEF's Rights Respecting Schools programme on the behaviour of children in those schools that have adopted it. [150347]

Kevin Brennan: The Rights, Respect and Responsibilities (RRR) programme provides a framework of values based on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Rights Respecting School awards are made by UNICEF to schools which teach children's and human rights and where rights and respect are modelled in all relationships. The Department has not made a systematic assessment of the RRR programme's effect on pupils' behaviour, but we know of schools which implement the programme and which have reported improvements in behaviour.

Helping pupils understand their rights and responsibilities, which is central to RRR, can reinforce the Department's Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) programme, which has been shown to have positive effects on behaviour.


23 July 2007 : Column 882W

Behaviour-related guidance, training and curriculum materials produced by the Department emphasise the importance of promoting mutual respect and personal responsibility and while the Department does not actively promote the specific RRR framework, schools are free to adopt it. The Department does not collect information about the numbers of schools involved in RRR.

Schools: Inspections

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many Ofsted school inspections took place in each year from 1992-93 to 2006-07; how many have taken place in 2007-08; and if he will make a statement. [149083]

Jim Knight: This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the Library.

Schools: Nurses

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) part-time and (b) full-time school nurses were employed by local authorities in each of the last three years. [150741]

Jim Knight: The information is not available in the format requested.

The table provides the full-time equivalent number of matrons, nurses and medical staff employed in local authority maintained schools by local authority in each January from 2004 to 2006. The number of nurses cannot be provided separately. These figures can be provided only on a full-time equivalent basis and cannot be broken down by full and part-time staff.

2007 local authority figures are likely to be available on 27 September.


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