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25 July 2007 : Column 1169W—continued

Young Offenders: Video Games

David T.C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) playstations (one or two) and (b) Xboxes were purchased for inmates of young offender institutions (YOIs) in each of the last three years; and how much was spent on (i) Playstations (one or two) and (ii) Xboxes for YOIs in each of the last three years. [152085]

Maria Eagle: The information requested is contained in the table below. It is possible that additional purchases of these items could have been made on a local basis by individual prisons. This information is not held centrally and can only be gathered by contacting each young offender institution’s financial records and this could be done only at disproportionate cost.

The number and cost of Playstations and Xboxes purchased for Offenders in public sector Young Offender Institutions between 2005 and 2008
2005-06 2006-07( 1) 2007-08

Playstations

Number purchased

45

84

42

Amount spent (£)

4,841

9,218

4,767

XBoxes

Number purchased

0

15

0

Amount spent (£)

0

1,672

0

(1) Information correct as of 23 July 2007

Home Department

Asylum

Mr. Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the average caseload is of an asylum case owner; and what the figure is in each regional asylum team. [147762]

Jacqui Smith: Regional asylum teams became fully operational from 5 March this year. Most started to take cases from November 2006. The caseload will include cases across the spectrum of the asylum process—including those who claimed last week and are yet to be interviewed, stretching through the appeals process to include those for whom preparations for removal are being made.

In the same time frame, the average caseload per case worker per region is:


25 July 2007 : Column 1170W
Caseload per case worker

Central London

23

West London

19

Liverpool

23

Leeds

23

Solihull

24

Cardiff

19

Glasgow

21


Border and Immigration Agency: Immigration and Nationality Directorate

Mr. Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what records (a) are kept of the performance of the Border and Immigration Agency and (b) were kept of the performance of the Immigration and Nationality Directorate, in processing incoming passengers at ports of entry; [151502]

(2) what the average time taken to process an incoming passenger through passport control at a port of entry to the UK was in each of the last five years, broken down by port of entry. [151503]

Jacqui Smith [holding answer 23 July 2007]: The estimated number of international arrivals from outside the common travel area was 101.9 million in 2005 of which 11.8 million were non-EEA nationals.

The Border and Immigration Agency do monitor queuing times closely. Passports of EEA nationals are checked with the minimum of delay and we aim to check passengers who are not EEA nationals within 45 minutes. Passengers using the Iris Recognition Immigration System (IRIS) can expect to cross the IRIS barrier within approximately 20 seconds. Further information on waiting times is available on:

Community Policing: Great Yarmouth

Mr. Anthony Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the impact of safer neighbourhood teams in Great Yarmouth. [151968]

Mr. McNulty: The Home Office is monitoring and evaluating the neighbourhood policing programme across England and Wales through a strategic research programme. The results will be published in due course.

The Home Office also continues to assess police performance, including the impact of neighbourhood policing, through the Police Performance Assessment Framework (PPAF). Inspections by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary also provide a qualitative assessment of neighbourhood policing delivery.

Community Support Officers: Cambridgeshire

Mr. Paice: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the average length of employment as a police community support officer was of police community support officers employed in Cambridgeshire in each of the last three years. [150704]

Mr. McNulty: The information requested is not collected centrally in the police personnel statistics.


25 July 2007 : Column 1171W

Departments: Legislation

Mr. Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what criminal offences have been created by primary legislation sponsored by her Department since October 2006. [149598]

Jacqui Smith: Since October 2006, criminal offences were created in the following Acts sponsored by the Home Office:

(a) Police and Justice Act 2006

(b) Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006

Both Acts also amended some existing offences in certain respects.

DNA Database

Mr. Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 26 April 2007 to the hon. Member for Sheffield, Hallam, Official Report, column 1234W, on the DNA Database, (1) on how many occasions a positive match against one of the individuals recorded in the database has been made in relation to a police investigation in each of the last five years; [149718]

(2) what records are kept of positive matches located in a search of the National DNA Database; [149759]

(3) how many searches were made of the National DNA database in each of the last five years; and how many resulted in (a) a match, (b) a familial match and (c) a sanction detection; [149763]

(4) how many offences were detected through a DNA match with an individual whose DNA was taken in a no further action arrest in each of the last five years. [149760]

Jacqui Smith: The purpose of the National DNA Database (NDNAD) is to hold a record of a person's DNA which can be matched against DNA taken from crime scenes. The NDNAD only reports matches between DNA profile records based on DNA profile compatibility, and sends them to police forces for the use in an investigation. It does not hold data on arrests, charges and convictions. Such information is held on the Police National Computer (PNC).


25 July 2007 : Column 1172W

The NDNAD does not hold data on reported matches and their outcomes (sanction detections). Obtaining this information would require cross-searching of records held on the PNC against the NDNAD, and then contacting each police force that received the DNA match to ascertain the outcome. This information could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

It is not possible to provide details of the number of searches made of the National DNA Database (NDNAD) in each of the last five years. Each time a subject or crime stain profile is loaded onto the NDNAD it is searched against all the retained profiles. No record has been kept of the number of searches but thousands of these searches are made of the NDNAD every day.

In the last five years the following matches have been recorded:

(i) Matches where a crime scene was linked with one or more subjects
Number

2006-07

42,208

2005-06

44,611

2004-05

40,879

2003-04

39,335

2002-03

43,904


(ii) Matches where a crime scene was linked to another crime scene
Number

2006-07

3,349

2005-06

4,237

2004-05

4,349

2003-04

2,816

2002-03

3,258


Drugs: Crime

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what quantity of illegal drugs was seized by the police in (a) 1997 and (b) the most recent year for which figures are available. [152183]

Mr. Coaker: The latest available data on drug seizures is for 2004 and can be found in the Home Office Statistical Bulletin series "Seizures of Drugs, England and Wales 2004". The quantities seized by the police in England and Wales, for 1997 and 2004, for each drug are shown in the table attached.

The quantities of LSD and ecstasy-type drugs (including MDMA) seized have been listed in thousands of doses seized rather than as a weight. In 2004 the seized LSD quantity was published in number of doses; this answer gives seized LSD quantities in thousands of doses.

Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the police forces and HM Revenue and Customs. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.


25 July 2007 : Column 1173W
Table S3 Quantity of seizures of Class A, B and C drugs made by police( 1) by drug type and year, England and Wales, 1997 and 2004
Quantity( 2) of seizures
Drug type 1997 2004

Class A

Cocaine

270

1,270

Crack

30

130

Heroin

420

1,130

LSD(2)

40

6(3)

Ecstasy-type(2)

360

1,680

Methadone

110

60

Morphine

0

0

Other Class A

0

10

Class B

Amphetamines

570

930

Barbiturates

Cannabis (herbal)(4)

8,180

*

Cannabis plants (2, 4)

77,570

*

Cannabis resin (4)

60,790

*

Other Class B

0

Class C

Benzodiazepines

0

0

Cannabis (herbal) )

*

2,790

Cannabis plants(2, 4)

*

88,670

Cannabis resin(4)

*

21,680

Temazepam

0

Anabolic steroids

10

0

GHB

*

0

Other Class C

0

0

(1) Seizures from joint operations involving HM Revenue and Customs and the police are generally recorded against HM Revenue and Customs. (2) Drugs are seized in a variety of forms but where possible, for the purpose of this table, amounts have been converted to weights (kg), except for seizures of LSD and Ecstasy-type which are given in thousands of doses. Cannabis plants are given in thousands of plants. Seizures of unspecified quantities are not included. (3) Published as 6190 doses (4) From January 2004, Cannabis was reclassified from a class B to a class C drug. Notes: 1. MDMA prior to 1996. 2. Seizures from joint operations involving HM Revenue and Customs and the police are generally recorded against HM Revenue and Customs.

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