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25 July 2007 : Column 1232W—continued


Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average waiting times were to see a child and adolescent mental health services specialist in each of the last five years. [150661]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: Information is not collected in the format requested. The most recent information available is from the 2006 child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) mapping exercise. In November 2006, there were 23,705 children and young people waiting to be seen by specialist CAMHS in England, a reduction of 2,494 from the previous year. There were 26,199 children and young people waiting in 2005, 30,716 in 2004 and 28,880 in 2003.

In November 2006 51 per cent. of new cases were seen by specialist CAMHS within four weeks, an additional 36 per cent. within 13 weeks, and a further 9 per cent. within 26 weeks.

In November 2005 52 per cent. of new cases were seen by specialist CAMHS within four weeks, an additional 33 per cent. within 13 weeks, and a further 10 per cent. within 26 weeks. 5 per cent. of children and young people waited over 26 weeks to be seen by specialist CAMHS. In 2002, only 24 per cent. of new cases were seen within four weeks and just over 50 per cent. were seen with 13 weeks.

Waits for cases still waiting to be seen by the end of the sample period
<= 4 weeks 5 to <= 13 weeks 14 to <= 26 weeks > 26 weeks Total cases

2002

50.8

29.4

19.8

21,329

2003

28

32

22

18

28,880

2004

30

33

18

20

30,716

2005

35

32

15

18

26,199

2006

40.2

36.1

13.5

10.1

23,705


Waits for new cases
Percentage
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

< 4 weeks

24.10

48.10

50.62

52.26

50.72

5 to <= 13 weeks

40.90

29.20

31.13

32.26

35.72

14 to <= 26 weeks

20.20

13.70

10.69

10.08

8.79

> 26 weeks

14.80

9.00

7.55

5.40

4.77


The majority of new cases (51 per cent.) were reported as having waited less than four weeks to be seen by a CAMHS team. The wait of four weeks or less in the 2005, 2004 and 2003 mapping was experienced by 52 per cent., 51 per cent., and 48 per cent. of new cases respectively. 49.2 per cent. of new cases waited for more than four weeks in 2006, this is a higher proportion than the 47.7 per cent. in 2005, but lower than 49.4 per cent. in 2004 and 51.9 per cent. in 2003. 13.6 per cent. of new cases waited for more than 13 weeks in 2006, a lower proportion than 15.5 per cent. in 2005, 18.3 per cent. in 2004 and 22.7 per cent. in 2003. Waits over six months continued to fall, to 4.7 per cent. in 2006, from 5.4 per cent. in 2005, 7.6 per cent. in 2004 and 9.0 per cent. in 2003.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what percentage of children treated by a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services specialist in each of the last five years was prescribed (a) a talking therapy, (b) medication and (c) an alternative treatment. [150662]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: This information is not collected centrally. It is for primary care trusts to decide how best to work with local partners to obtain the best possible outcomes for patients.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services have set up projects within the last year to work jointly with (a) schools, (b) youth offending teams and (c) social workers. [150663]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: This information is not collected centrally.

Mentally Ill: Children

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many children have been diagnosed with mental health disorders, broken down by type of disorder. [151000]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: We do not collect such information centrally. However, the Office for National Statistics has produced a report “Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004” based on a survey of the mental health of children. This gives the prevalence of mental disorder in children aged between five and 16 as 9.6 per cent., broken down as follows: emotional disorders 3.7 per cent.; conduct disorders 5.8 per cent.; hyperkinetic disorders 1.5 per cent.; and less common disorders 1.3 per cent.

MRSA: Medical Treatments

Mr. Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of using photodynamic therapy to treat patients with MRSA within the NHS. [151347]


25 July 2007 : Column 1233W

Ann Keen: The Department has not made any specific assessments regarding the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy to treat patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Musculoskeletal Disorders: Health Services

Mr. Hands: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps have been taken to implement the Musculoskeletal Services Framework; and if he will make a statement. [151486]

Ann Keen: The Musculoskeletal Services Framework was published as good practice guidance, and as such the Department is not mandating its implementation. However, adopting this good practice will help organisations towards achieving the 18 weeks target.

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how he communicates Government health policy to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE); and what requirements are placed on NICE to follow such policies. [151907]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department and national health service priorities are encapsulated in the published criteria for the selection of topics for referral to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). As part of the topic selection, proposed topics are assessed against the published criteria by one of a number of consideration panels. The panels are chaired by national clinical directors or other leading experts and are attended by relevant departmental policy officials who ensure the process is informed by Government policy.

NHS Next Stage Review

Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to his oral statement of 4 July 2007, Official Report, columns 91-3, on NHS next stage review, if he will refer the decision of the Oxfordshire Radcliffe NHS Trust to reconfigure services at the Horton General hospital in Banbury, referred to him by the Oxfordshire Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee, to the independent reconfiguration panel. [151599]

Mr. Ivan Lewis [holding answer 23 July 2007]: The oral statement of 4 July clearly stated that while Lord Darzi is undertaking his wide-ranging review of the NHS, the Secretary of State will, as a matter of course, ask the Independent Reconfiguration Panel (IRP) for advice on any decisions made at a local level which have been referred by Overview and Scrutiny Committees.

As of 17 July 2007, a letter of referral from Oxfordshire Overview and Scrutiny Committee has not been received by the Department. Should such a referral be forthcoming, we would expect to seek the advice of the IRP on the case.

NHS: Carbon Emissions

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the annual carbon dioxide output of the NHS; and whether his
25 July 2007 : Column 1234W
Department is meeting its set targets to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. [151049]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The most recent available figures show that in 2005-06 the estimated carbon dioxide output in the national health service was 3.31 million tonnes.

The NHS was set mandatory targets in respect of energy efficiency and carbon emissions in 2001. In order to maintain the progress it has been making towards meeting these targets, the then Minister of State for Health Delivery and Reform (Andy Burnham) launched a £100 million capital energy and sustainability fund in January 2007. The fund will allow improvements in electrical efficiency and reduced carbon emissions in the NHS through a combination of various schemes. These will include identifying renewable energy sources, the installation of better building insulation, installation of combined heat and power units and the replacement of inefficient boilers and distribution systems.

In respect of its own separate operational estate, the Department is currently on track to meet its target to reduce office carbon dioxide emissions by 12.5 per cent. by 2010-11, relative to 1999-2000 levels. It is also on track to meet the target to reduce its road transport emissions by 15 per cent. by 2010, relative to 2005-06 levels, including a new transport policy that will offer the opportunity to identify further savings.

NHS: Managers

Dr. Gibson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department is considering phasing out national clinical directors. [151720]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department has no plans to phase out national clinical directors.

Osteoporosis: Medical Treatments

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to publish mandatory alternative treatment options for patients for whom Alendronate is unsuitable; and if he will make a statement. [152363]

Ann Keen: We have no plans to publish mandatory alternative treatment options for patients for whom Alendronate is unsuitable.

Prescriptions: Contraceptives

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many prescriptions were issued for emergency contraceptives in each month since January 2001. [150956]

Dawn Primarolo: The available information is shown in the following tables.

The information shown in the table is for prescriptions dispensed in the community (almost all of these prescriptions are written by general practice) for emergency hormonal contraception.


25 July 2007 : Column 1235W
Quarter( 1) Items (Thousand )

2001

January-March

91.3

2001

April-June

87.8

2001

July-September

88.4

2001

October-December

98.0

2002

January-March

98.1

2002

April-June

95.2

2002

July-September

96.3

2002

October-December

93.9

2003

January-March

93.4

2003

April-June

93.9

2003

July-September

95.6

2003

October-December

89.9

2004

January-March

90.1

2004

April-June

87.2

2004

July-September

85.4

2004

October-December

79.4

2005

January-March

75.9

2005

April-June

80.5

2005

July-September

83.0

2005

October-December

76.0

2006

January-March

75.1

2006

April-June

77.1

2006

July-September

76.2

2006

October-December

70.3

2007

January-March

69.9

(1) Figures are held on a quarterly not monthly basis.
Source:
Prescription information is taken from the Prescription Cost Analysis system, supplied by the Prescription Pricing Division of the Business Services Authority, and is based on a full analysis of all prescriptions dispensed in the community i.e. by community pharmacists and appliance contractors, dispensing doctors, and prescriptions submitted by prescribing doctors for items personally administered in England. The data do not cover drugs dispensed in hospitals.

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