Select Committee on Home Affairs Written Evidence


Annex C

COUNT ME IN 2005 CENSUS OF MENTAL HEALTH INPATIENTS AND ETHNICITY

RATES OF ADMISSION

  The census showed that rates of admission to hospital for mental illness were higher for some BME groups, when compared with the total population.

  Rates of admission of men from the White British, Chinese and Indian groups were lower than average. Rates were higher for men from all other ethnic groups, including the White Irish and Other White group. They were particularly high for men from Black and White/Black Mixed groups, with rates at three or more times higher than average. White and Black Caribbean, Caribbean, African, Other Black and Other Ethnic groups are over 3 times more likely to be admitted (see figure 6 for standardised rates of admission by ethnic group).


ROUTES OF REFERRAL

  The census showed that the way in which an inpatient was referred to mental health services differed between ethnic groups. For inpatients from the Black Caribbean, Black African and Other Black groups, the rate of referral by GP was well below average (40% to 70% lower), whilst referrals by the police were lower than average in the White British group and almost double in the Black Caribbean and Black African groups. Similarly, referrals by the court were lower than average in the White British group and almost double in the Black Caribbean group.





 
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