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6 Dec 2007 : Column 1369W

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many confirmed data security breaches there have been in his Department in the last 36 months; and what action was taken after each occurrence. [169894]

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether he proposes to review how his Department transports data; and whether his Department uses TNT to transport data; [169367]

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) when each electronic database held by his Department containing personal information on members of the general public was first created; [169279]

(2) how many staff in his Department have access to electronic databases which contain personal information on members of the general public, broken down by grade; [169281]

(3) how many security breaches regarding access to personal data occurred within his Department in each year since 1997. [169280]

Kevin Brennan: I refer the hon. Members to the statement made by my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister on 21 November 2007, Official Report, column 1179. The review by the Cabinet Secretary and security experts is looking at procedures within Departments and agencies for the storage and use of data. A statement on Departments’ procedures will be made on completion of the review.

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisers

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will list the special advisers employed by his Department, setting out in each case their (a) responsibilities and (b) pay bands. [169835]

Kevin Brennan: The names and pay bands of all special advisers are contained in the Prime Minister’s written statement to the House of 22 November 2007, Official Report, column 148-49WS.

Their duties are conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Code of Conduct for Special Advisers, a copy of which is in the Library of the House.

English Language

Mr. Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment his Department has made of the additional demands that children without English as their first language place on primary and secondary schools. [169550]

Jim Knight: At January 2007, there were 789,720 children in primary and secondary schools with English as an additional language (EAL): that is 120,240 or some 18 per cent. higher than in 2004. EAL children comprise 12 per cent. of the whole population, up from 9 per cent. in 2004. Schools need to help such children acquire fluency in English as early as possible so that they can access the full curriculum.


6 Dec 2007 : Column 1370W

The Government provide funding for new arrivals and EAL children in schools through two main routes. The first is an element within the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) for primary schools which was some £256 million in 2004-05, rising to £299 million in 2007-08, with a further rise to over £330 million in 2010-11—an 11 per cent. real terms increase on the 2004-05 level. The second is a substantial provision for EAL through the ring fenced Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant (EMAG), which has risen from £162 million in 2004-05 to £179 million in 2007-08 and will rise to £206 million by 2010-11—a 9 per cent. increase on the 2004-05 level. In addition an Exceptional Circumstances Grant (ECG) has been introduced to reflect changes in local authorities’ pupil numbers which occur after the three year indicative allocations of DSG have been announced. It has three elements covering: an increase of more than 2.5 per cent. in overall pupil numbers; an increase of more than 2.5 per cent. in the proportion of children with EAL; and a one-off payment to authorities with EAL proportions below 10 per cent. which experience an increase in their EAL proportion of more than 2.5 per cent.

These increases in funding form part of the substantial overall increase in school funding: over the past 10 years since 1997, overall per pupil revenue funding for schools has increased by 67 per cent. in real terms. We expect local authorities to be able to manage new pressures from within these very substantial increases.

EU Lisbon Strategy

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what steps he is taking to meet the objectives of the EU Lisbon strategy. [170308]

Jim Knight [holding answer 3 December 2007]: The contribution of education and training to the Lisbon agenda is set out in the Education and Training 2010 Work Programme, and this Department plays an active role within the four main strands of the programme: setting priority areas for action; supporting peer learning and exchange of best practice; benchmarking progress; and developing common tools to support EU mobility and transparency of qualifications.

Furthermore, the UK's contribution to the EU Ministerial Education and Youth Councils and the official level working groups is rooted in the Lisbon Strategy, as this is where we see the EU as adding the most value. In particular, we are working to ensure that education and youth policy complements those policies being developed in other Lisbon spheres such as employment, social policy, and economic and financial affairs. This will help member states develop policies which will equip their citizens with the education and skills needed to thrive in a knowledge-based economy.

Free School Meals

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what proportion of students in each London borough were eligible to receive free school meals in the latest period for which figures are available. [169239]


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Jim Knight: The available information has been placed in the Library. The tables have been taken from the Statistical First Release “Schools and Pupils in England: January 2007 (Final)” which is available at:

Free School Meals: Greater London

Mr. Randall: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what percentage of children in (a) Uxbridge constituency and (b) each London borough were eligible for free school meals in each year since 1997. [169681]

Jim Knight: The requested information has been placed in the Library.

GCSE

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment he has made of the effects of the introduction of more modular examinations at GCSE and A level on examination results since 1997; and if he will make a statement. [163535]

Jim Knight: It is the responsibility of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) to regulate the public examinations system, and review standards. The QCA seeks views on the effect of modular examinations through consultations with stakeholders and by monitoring standards. However, it is difficult to disentangle the impact of modularisation from that of any other changes to GCSEs and A levels.

QCA has worked to ensure that standards are consistent and results have improved. Anecdotally, at A level the introduction of AS has helped this by engaging more candidates from the outset and, by allowing them to take a wider range of subjects, candidates concentrate on the subjects they are best at for the full A level.

QCA sought views on the effect of modular examinations as part of the consultation on GCSE criteria which was run earlier this year. The results of the consultation will be available on the QCA website, www.qca.org.uk, in mid-December.

Head Teachers: Qualifications

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many teachers have been appointed without the National Professional Qualification for Headship as existing head teachers changing schools, in each year since 2004; and if he will make a statement. [169795]

Jim Knight: We do not hold data on how many head teachers have moved to a second or subsequent headship post since 2004 and do not hold the National Professional Qualification for Headship (NPQH), as there is no tracking of teacher movements across the system. It is compulsory for all new heads in maintained schools or non-maintained special schools to have, or be working towards, NPQH if they took up their first headship post in a local authority maintained school or a special school after April 2004. It will be mandatory to hold the qualification (rather than be
6 Dec 2007 : Column 1372W
working towards it) from 1 April 2009. However, it is not a requirement for head teachers who took up their first headship post prior to April 2004 to hold NPQH in their existing post, or if appointed to a second or subsequent headship post.

Higher Education: British Overseas Territories

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many students from British Overseas Territories have obtained places at London universities in each year since 1997; [168430]

(2) how many students from British Crown Dependencies have obtained places at London universities in each year since 1997. [168431]

Bill Rammell: I have been asked to reply.

The latest available information is given in the table. Figures for 2006/07 will be available in January 2008.


6 Dec 2007 : Column 1373W
Entrants to Higher Education Institutions in London ( 1) from British Overseas Territories ( 2) and British Crown Dependencies ( 3) by Level of Study Academic years 1997/98 to 2005/06
Level of study Academic year Entrants from British Overseas Territories Entrants from British Crown Dependencies

Postgraduate

1997/98

15

30

1998/99

25

30

1999/2000

10

25

2000/01

20

30

2001/02

10

35

2002/03

20

50

2003/04

20

60

2004/05

35

50

2005/06

30

45

Undergraduate

1997/98

10

75

1998/99

20

80

1999/2000

15

115

2000/01

20

110

2001/02

15

100

2002/03

15

135

2003/04

15

110

2004/05

20

105

2005/06

20

120

Total

1997/98

25

105

1998/99

45

105

1999/2000

25

140

2000/01

40

140

2001/02

30

135

2002/03

35

185

2003/04

40

170

2004/05

50

155

2005/06

50

165

(1) Includes all Higher Education Institutions in London Government Office Region.
(2) British Overseas Territories are—Anguilla, Bermuda, British Antarctic Territory, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Falkland Islands, Montserrat, Pitcairn Islands, South Georgia and South Sandwich Isles, St. Helena and its Dependencies, Turks and Caicos Islands. But also Gibraltar and the Sovereign Base Areas of Cyprus, students from which are counted as EU nationals for fee purposes.
(3) British Crown Dependencies are—Isle of Man Channel Islands: Bailiwick of Jersey, Bailiwick of Guernsey (including Guernsey and its dependencies)
Note:
Numbers are on a Snapshot basis as at 1 December, and have been rounded to the nearest 5.
Source:
Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

Mathematics: GCSE

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what percentage score was required for a GCSE pass in mathematics at Grade A for each examination board in each year from 1997 to 2007. [163306]

Jim Knight: This information is not held centrally. The process awarding bodies go through to ensure that standards are consistent means that there will be variations in terms of raw marks required between different awarding bodies’ qualifications and from year-to-year.

It is for the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) as the qualifications regulator to oversee the awarding process to ensure that standards are comparable both between different qualifications and over time. The Chief Executive of QCA, Dr. Ken Boston, has written to the hon. Member on this issue and a copy of his reply and the report mentioned have been placed in the Library.

Letter from Ken Boston, dated 20 November 2007:

GCSE and A level grades


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