Previous Section Index Home Page

10 Dec 2007 : Column 274W—continued


LLFS 2004/05 APS 2005 APS 2006
Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage

Barking and Dagenham

4,000

47

4,000

47

3,600

39

Barnet

7,300

46

7,300

46

9,100

55

Bexley

4,500

41

4,500

41

3,900

32

Brent

7,800

71

7,800

71

7,700

76

Bromley

5,700

41

5,700

41

4,700

34

Camden

6,000

65

6,000

65

4,300

55

Croydon

8,400

47

8,400

47

7,500

48

Ealing

6,800

53

6,800

53

5,500

42

Enfield

7,500

53

7,500

53

6,300

46

Greenwich

3,400

32

3,400

32

3,900

31

Hackney

6,900

56

6,900

56

5,400

47

Hammersmith and Fulham

3,500

48

3,500

48

4,800

71

Haringey

6,500

52

6,500

52

6,400

49

Harrow

4,900

46

4,900

46

4,800

58

Havering

3,800

36

3,800

36

4,300

37

Hillingdon

7,000

51

7,000

51

4,600

41

Hounslow

4,200

42

4,200

42

4,200

37

Islington

3,800

54

3,800

54

3,600

44

Kensington and Chelsea

4,100

86

4,100

86

3,400

68

Kingston upon Thames

3,100

41

3,100

41

2,800

42

Lambeth

3,600

46

3,600

46

4,000

36

Lewisham

4,300

48

4,300

48

6,900

64

Merton

2,400

42

2,400

42

4,200

43

Newham

7,400

58

7,400

58

7,100

60

Redbridge

9,200

66

9,200

66

7,100

50

Richmond upon Thames

4,000

53

4,000

53

3,700

53

Southwark

6,300

52

6,300

52

5,200

45

Sutton

2,000

23

2,000

23

2,800

30

Tower Hamlets

6,200

49

6,200

49

8,200

61

Waltham Forest

4,000

44

4,000

44

4,400

40

Wandsworth

6,600

50

6,600

50

4,900

55

Westminster(2)

4,500

59

4,500

59

8,200

78

(1) The percentage of 16 to 19-year-olds in employment or training but not in employment relates to academic age and is the average over a whole year.
(2) Data for City of London were included with Westminster in the APS and LLFS data.

Vocational Education: Finance

Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what central Government funding was for vocational higher education in (a) Cornwall and (b) England in each year since 1979. [166708]

Bill Rammell: I have been asked to reply.

It is not possible to answer the question in precisely the way it has been asked. Total Government funding for higher education has risen from around £500 million in 1979 to some £10 billion today, but successive Governments have not allocated funding on the basis of particular areas or types of provision, but largely on the basis of supply and demand. We are keen to raise both the demand for and supply of sustainable
10 Dec 2007 : Column 275W
higher education opportunities in Cornwall and will continue to work with a range of partners to try to achieve this.

Young People: Employment

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment he has made of the likely effects of the provisions of the Education and Skills Bill if enacted on the employment of young people aged 16 to 18 years; and if he will make a statement. [171926]

Jim Knight: Under the policy to raise the participation age 16 and 17-year-olds will still be able to work, as long as they are in some form of education or training alongside this. There will be no effect on those currently in full-time employment, and there will never be a situation in which full time employees suddenly have to change to part time working—the first 16-year-olds to be affected are aged 10 now. Young people will know before entering employment at 16 that they have to be in learning part time. And they will not all necessarily work part time. Some will work full time and be provided will accredited training by their employer, and we will encourage employers to do this. Some may rearrange their working hours to attend part time training, rather than working fewer hours. The impact assessment for the Education and Skills Bill was published alongside the Bill on 29 November and copies have been placed in the Library of the House. The impact assessment sets out that the estimated foregone productivity cost to the economy of some young people being released for education or training for one day a week who might otherwise have worked full-time is estimated to be around £4.3 million per cohort.

Young People: Unemployment

Mr. Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many people aged (a) 16 and (b) 17 in (i) Jarrow constituency, (ii) South Tyneside, (iii) the North East and (iv) the UK were not in education, employment or training in each year since 1997. [169841]

Beverley Hughes: The Department publishes annual estimates of the number of 16 and 17-year-olds not in education, employment or training (NEET) in England. Figures for 1997 to 2006 are shown in the following table. Equivalent information for the UK is not available.

16 year-olds NEET 17 year-olds NEET

1997

38,100

48,000

1998

44,900

49,800

1999

41,800

41,800

2000

42,400

43,700

2001

45,900

59,000

2002

49,800

55,000

2003

51,400

47,500

2004

51,000

59,000

2005

53,000

73,300

2006 (provisional)

42,800

62,700


Next Section Index Home Page