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18 Dec 2007 : Column 1239W—continued

A simple caution is a non-statutory disposal which allows the police to deal quickly and simply with less serious offences, to divert offenders where appropriate from appearing in criminal courts and to reduce the likelihood of re-offending. Whether to caution an offender for a criminal offence is an operational matter for the
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police, and, in the case of indictable-only offences, the police and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS). The police must consider whether a simple caution is appropriate to the offence and the offender, and whether it is likely to be effective in the circumstances.

The number of offenders aged 10 to 15 years-old who were given final warnings or reprimands for all offences in Essex police force area for the years 2001 to 2005( 1, 2, 3)
Age
10 11 12 13 14 15 Total

2001

42

85

178

325

456

496

1,582

2002

31

62

154

321

374

393

1,335

2003

30

60

152

259

383

384

1,268

2004

35

77

185

312

423

504

1,536

2005

87

133

273

511

772

722

2,498

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and final warnings. These figures have been included in the totals. Source: Court proceedings database held by RDS - OCJR, Ministry of Justice

Innovation, Universities and Skills

Animal Experiments

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what steps the Government have taken to reduce the numbers of animals used for research purposes. [174575]

Ian Pearson: In 2004 Government established the National Centre for the Replacement Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NCSRs) to advance and promote the replacement, refinement and reduction of the use of animals in research. This is the first such centre to be established in the world and it receives funding from the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) via the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). In September this year, I announced NCSRs would receive £2.4 million, an increase of £1 million, for 11 new 3Rs projects. The CSR period will see further increased funding rising from £2.3 million in 2007-08 to just over £5 million in 2010-11. The centre also received £250,000 funding from the Home Office in 2007-08. Home Office funding after 2007-08 will be confirmed in due course.

The Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 (ASPA) regulates the use of animals in scientific procedures in the UK. The principles of the 3Rs are implicit in the ASPA; all UK scientists are therefore legally obliged to use alternative approaches to the use of animals where possible, to use the minimum number of animals, and to use protocols which cause the least pain, suffering or distress.


18 Dec 2007 : Column 1241W

Apprentices

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many (a) apprenticeships and (b) advanced apprenticeship places were (i) provided, (ii) filled and (iii) completed in England for those years for which data is available. [171988]

Mr. Lammy: Figures for those participating in apprenticeships can be derived from the Learning and Skills Council's (LSC) Individualised Learner Record (ILR). The ILR is a census of activity capturing provision that learners enrol on and not the number of places that are available to learners. The standard measure of success used is the success rate, which refers to the proportion of those who both complete and achieve the full apprenticeship framework in a given year. The following table shows the number of apprenticeship starts in each year and success rates from August to July each year.

Advanced Apprenticeship( 1) Apprenticeship( 1)
Starts( 2) (thousand) Success rate( 2) (percentage) Starts( 2) (thousand) Success rate( 2) (percentage)

2002-03

51,661

26

129,006

22

2003-04

56,959

32

136,606

30

2004-05

53,893

38

134,503

40

2005-06

50,628

53

120,682

53

2006-07

54,845

64

125,266

62

(1) Figures for 2002/-3 and 2003-04 are for advanced modern apprenticeships and foundation modern apprenticeships.
(2) The success rates shown in the table cannot be directly related to the number of starts in the same year because the ‘starts’ in any year are a different cohort of learners to those completing in that year.

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many (a) apprenticeships, (b) level 2 apprenticeships and (c) advanced apprenticeships there are, broken down by age group (i) 16 to 18, (ii) 19 to 25 and (iii) over 25 year olds. [173557]

Mr. Lammy: Figures for those participating in apprenticeships can be derived from the Learning and Skills Council's (LSC) Individualised Learner Record (ILR). The following table shows the number of apprenticeship starts from August 2006 to July 2007. Apprenticeships are at level 2 and advanced apprenticeships are at level 3. (A further breakdown by adult ages is not readily available.)

Advanced apprenticeship Apprenticeship
16 to 18 19+ Total 16 to 18 19+ Total

Starts

23,741

31,104

54,845

79,054

46,212

125,266


Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills which apprenticeships are only available at level 2, broken down by framework. [174362]


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Mr. Lammy: All Apprenticeships at level 2 have progression opportunities to advanced apprenticeships at level 3 in the same occupational area. The following are apprenticeship titles which are available only at level 2 and which lead to progression on to related advanced apprenticeships at the next level:

Departmental Recycling

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how much and what proportion of its waste his Department recycled in each of the last five years. [174437]

Mr. Lammy: As the Department was formed this year we do not have five years of waste recycling to report on.

The Department's accommodation is currently located within buildings managed by DCSF and DBERR and as such would normally be reported within their estates performance on sustainable operations on the Government estate.

Higher Education: Iran

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many students subject to Foreign and Commonwealth Office visa requirements before entering the UK to study at university have studied at the Imam Hossein University in Tehran. [172371]

Mr. Jim Murphy: I have been asked to reply.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office does not keep records of which overseas universities student applicants have studied at. This information could only be provided by examination of individual visa application forms and therefore at disproportionate cost.


18 Dec 2007 : Column 1243W

Science: North West Region

Mrs. Ellman: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what assessment he has made of the likely effect of the comprehensive spending review on (a) major science research projects in the North West and (b) physics departments in North Western universities. [173088]

Ian Pearson: [holding answer 11 December 2007]: Funding for science over the three years of the comprehensive spending review will increase in real terms by 2.7 per cent. per annum in line with the Government's commitment given in the 10 Year Science and Innovation Framework 2004-14 to increase funding in line with GDP growth. The Government have commissioned two reviews of particular relevance to the future of major science research projects and physics departments in the North West. It has asked Sir Tom McKillop to advise on the best way to implement the Government's vision for the Daresbury Science and Innovation Campus as part of his independent review into the future of the Manchester City Region and the North West economy. The Government have also asked Research Councils UK to conduct a number of further reviews of the health of disciplines in the UK. Bill Wakeham, Vice Chancellor of Southampton University, will lead the first of these reviews, which will address the health of physics in the UK.

UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation

Mrs. Villiers: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills if he will place in the Library a copy of the estimate of (a) running costs and (b) other costs for the proposed UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation. [174373]

Ian Pearson: Detailed proposals for the scheme, which will include an estimate of the financial costs, will be developed in 2008. The annual running costs of the centre will be determined as the final scientific plan is developed.

Mrs. Villiers: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills (1) what estimate he has made of the cost of moving the National Institute for Medical Research to become part of the proposed new UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation; [174374]

(2) what contribution the Medical Research Council will make to the costs of the proposed UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation; [174417]

(3) if he will break down the £500 million allocation announced by the Prime Minister for the establishment of the UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation (UKCMRI) by main budget heading; what estimate he has made of annual staffing costs of the UKCMRI; and whether the £500 million figure is an indicative budget. [174418]


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