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8 Jan 2008 : Column 472W—continued


Childbirth

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many babies in England were born underweight in the most recent period for which figures are available; and what assessment he has made of the principal causes of babies being underweight at birth. [172918]

Ann Keen: In 2005-06, the latest year for which we have figures, 42,900 babies were born with birthweights of less than 2,500g. The major cause of low birthweight is low gestational age. This information is from “NHS Maternity Statistics, England 2005-06”, a copy of which is available in the Library.

Dental Services: Portsmouth

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will list NHS dentists in Portsmouth indicating which are registering new NHS patients. [162555]

Ann Keen: National Health Service Business Services Authority (NHSBSA) Dental Services Division (DSD) can only provide validated information on the number of NHS dental practices within a constituency offering NHS dental care only at disproportionate cost. Some NHS treatment attracts patient charges.

The number of dentists are available in Annex G of the ‘NHS Dental Activity and Workforce Report, England: 31 March 2006’. A copy of this report is available in the Library.

Information is available at strategic health authority (SHA) and primary care trust (PCT) area in England 31 March 1997 to 31 March 2006.

Information is based on the old contractual arrangements. The report is also available on-line at:

The number of NHS dentists year ending 31 March 2007 are available in Table E2 of Annex 3 of the ‘NHS Dental Statistics for England 2006- 07 report’. Information is available at SHA and PCT area in England.

Since April 2006, patients no longer have to be registered with a dental practice to receive NHS care and treatment.

The closest equivalent current measure is the number of patients receiving NHS dental services (“patients seen”) in a given area over a 24-month period, for that area. However, this is not directly comparable to the registration data for earlier years.

The numbers of patients seen in the 24 month periods ending 31 March 2006 and 31 March 2007 are available in Table Cl of Annex 3 of the ‘NHS Dental Statistics for England 2006-07 report’. Information is available at SHA and PCT area in England.

A copy of this report is available in the Library and is also available at:

Doctors: Housing

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 29 November 2007, Official Report, column 714W, on doctors: housing, if he will make available the minutes of the meetings with the Junior Doctors Committee on the provision of accommodation. [172008]

Ann Keen: The minutes have been agreed between the British Medical Association (BMA) and the four health Departments. The BMA has no objection to the
8 Jan 2008 : Column 473W
release of the extract from the Joint Negotiation Committee (Juniors) minutes. This information has been placed in the Library.

Drugs: Misuse

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the likely effect of changes to the 2008 budget for the Young People’s Substance Misuse service in Hampshire. [174010]

Kevin Brennan: I have been asked to reply.

No announcements have been made in relation to future budget allocations for Young People’s Substance Misuse services. However young people and prevention are to be a key priority within the new Drugs Strategy, which is currently being developed in Government under the leadership of the Home Office and will be published in 2008.

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the 2008 budget is for the Young People’s Substance Misuse service in Hampshire; and what the budget was in each of the last five years. [174011]

Kevin Brennan: I have been asked to reply.

£

2007-08

911,015

2006-07

1,051,461

2005-06

1,059,508

2004-05

1,037,807

2003-04

127,803


Heart Diseases: Medical Equipment

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the likely effect of the draft guidance on drug eluting stents proposed by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence on the provision of (a) percutaneous coronary intervention and (b) coronary artery bypass grafting by the NHS if the draft guidance on drug eluting stents remains unchanged; what estimate he has made of the financial effect of any such change in provision; and if he will make a statement. [173950]

Ann Keen: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is reviewing its October 2003 guidance on the use of drug-eluting stents for the treatment of coronary artery disease. NICE is currently considering the responses it has received from stakeholders during the recent consultation on its draft recommendations.


8 Jan 2008 : Column 474W

NICE expects to publish final guidance in March 2008 so it would be inappropriate to comment at this time.

Heart Diseases: Medical Treatments

Dr. Desmond Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what proportion of patients with coronary heart disease have been treated with (a) coronary artery bypass operations, (b) drug-eluting stents and (c) bare metal stents in each year since guidance on the use of coronary artery stents was issued by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence in 2003 in (i) England, (ii) each strategic health authority and (iii) each NHS trust; [165853]

(2) what proportion of patients with coronary heart disease have received (a) coronary artery bypass operations and (b) percutaneous coronary interventions in each year since guidance on the use of coronary artery stents was issued by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence in 2003 in (i) England, (ii) each strategic health authority and (iii) each NHS trust. [165854]

Ann Keen: It is not possible for the Department to answer these questions because of the way relevant data are collected. Hospital episode statistics (HES) data counts each period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider, known as an “episode”. These figures do not represent numbers of actual patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within a year.

The information provided in the following table is HES data showing the number of episodes that patients with a coronary heart disease diagnosis have had. This may be of interest to the hon. Member.


8 Jan 2008 : Column 475W
Count of finished consultant episodes with a diagnosis mention of coronary heart disease and a procedure mention of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or insertion of prosthesis: Data for NHS Hospitals, England for 2003-04 to 2005-06
Finished consultant episodes
Procedure 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04

CABG

21,749

23,721

23,631

PTCA

55,559

50,062

41,470

Insertion of prosthesis into organ

44,190

37,425

30,938

Notes: Ungrossed Data Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed). Finished Consultant Episode (FCE) An FCE is defined as a period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. Please note that the figures do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the year. All Diagnoses count of episodes These figures represent a count of all FCE's where the diagnosis was mentioned in any of the 14 (seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in a HES record. ICD10 Diagnosis code used: Coronary Heart Disease = I20-I25 Assessing growth through time HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. During the years that these records have been collected the NHS there have been ongoing improvements in quality and coverage. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example a number of procedures may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and may no longer be accounted in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time. Data Quality Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are compiled from data sent by over 300 NHS Trusts and Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) in England. The Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain. All Operations count of Episodes These figures represent a count of all FCE's where the procedure was mentioned in any of the 12 (four prior to 2002-03) operation fields in a HES record. A record is only included once in each count, even if an operation is mentioned in more than one operation field of the record. Procedure codes used (OPCS 4.2): CABG = K40-46 PTCA = K49-50 Insertion of Prosthesis into Organ = Y02.2

Hospitals: Consultants

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will place in the Library copies of (a) the business case that his Department provided to HM Treasury in 2002 on the new contract for consultants and (b) HM Treasury's response to the business case. [170180]

Ann Keen: The business case for new contracts for national health service staff formed part of the discussions between the Department and HM's Treasury during the 2002 Spending Review, which concluded in July 2002. It is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such discussions.

Hospitals: Drugs

Mr. Barron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of medication errors made in hospitals at each stage of the medication process in (a) accident and emergency departments and (b) other settings in hospital in the most recent period for which figures are available. [175411]

Ann Keen: The precise number of medication errors taking place in national health service hospitals is not known.

Comprehensive information concerning the number of patient safety incidents reported via the National Patient Safety Agency's National Reporting and Learning System was published in Patient Safety Observatory Report “Safety In Doses” in July 2007.


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The report reviewed 60,000 medication incidents reported across the NHS between January 2005 to June 2006.

Information from this report concerning incidents from accident and emergency departments and acute hospitals is shown in tables 1 and 2.

Table 1: Medication incidents reported from accident and emergency (A&E) departments: January 2005 to June 2006
Stage of medication process Incidents

Administration/supply of a medicine from a clinical area

1,278

Monitoring/follow-up of medicine use

100

Preparation of medicines in all locations/dispensing in a pharmacy

160

Prescribing

342

Other

56

Total

1,936


Table 2: Medication incidents reported from acute hospitals (not A&E): January 2005 to June 2006
Stage of medication process Incidents

Administration/supply of a medicine from a clinical area

27,505

Monitoring/follow-up of medicine use

1,896

Preparation of medicines in all locations/dispensing in a pharmacy

7,339

Prescribing

7,491

Other

886

Total

45,117


Mr. Barron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of patients harmed by medication error in hospital in each of the last five years. [175412]

Ann Keen: The precise number of patients harmed by medication errors in hospital each year is not known.

However, the National Patient Safety Agency’s national reporting and learning system (NRLS) receives reports of patient safety incidents of actual harm involving medicines.

All national health service hospital trusts in England and Wales were connected to the NRLS by January 2005. Since this date, the number of medication incident reports has increased as NHS reporting culture and methods have improved. Increasing numbers should not be interpreted as increasing numbers of incidents but rather an increase in the number of incidents that are reported.

Number of NRLS reports involving medicines where harm has been reported

April 2004 to March 2005

1,106

April 2005 to March 2006

6,001

April 2006 to March 2007

9,702

April 2007 to November 2007

6,544

Total

23,338


Mr. Barron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of patients who died as a result of medication error in hospital in each of the last five years. [175413]


8 Jan 2008 : Column 477W

Ann Keen: The following table provides information about reports to the national reporting and learning system (NRLS) about patients involving medicines.

Number of fatal NRLS reports involving medicines

April 2004 to March 2005

12

April 2005 to March 2006

5

April 2006 to March 2007

27

April 2007 to November 2007

24

Date not available

17

Total

78


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