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9 Jan 2008 : Column 650W—continued


Further Education

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what proportion of young people remained in full-time education in the year after they ended compulsory schooling in each year since 1997; [176975]

(2) what proportion of young people remained in full-time education two years after they ended compulsory schooling in each year since 1997. [176976]

Jim Knight: Estimates for the proportion of young people of academic age 16 and 17 participating in full-time education in each year since 1997 are shown in the following table. Academic age is defined as age at the start of the academic year, 31 August, so young people of academic age 16 are in their first year after compulsory education, and those of academic age 17 are in their second year. The estimates are based on a snapshot at the end of the calendar year.

Percentage of young people in full-time education by academic age and year
1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Aged 16

70.2

70.2

718

710

70.8

72.0

72.1

73.8

75.8

78.1

Aged 17

58.7

58.5

59.7

60.0

58.5

59.0

59.9

60.5

62.7

65.0


GCSE: Tower Hamlets

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the most recent GCSE performance measures are for each secondary school in Tower Hamlets; and if he will make a statement. [163308]

Jim Knight: The information is in the Library and available on the DCSF website at:

The data will be updated on 10 January with results from the 2006/07 exams.

General Certificate of Secondary Education

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what the reasons were for the decision not to proceed with the GCSE pilots for embedding functional skills assessment within GCSE English and ICT; [164421]

(2) how much his Department spent on preparing for the GCSE pilots for embedding functional skills assessment within GCSE English and ICT. [164420]

Jim Knight: We think it is important that young people have specific recognition of their functional skills as part of their 14 to 19 study and achievement. The development work done by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority ahead of the pilot which started in September was intended to look at the feasibility of different approaches.

The work done on the embedded assessment models following the initial trials highlighted the technical difficulties of getting both a discrete assessment of functional skills attainment and a GCSE assessment out of the same exam without losing some of the essential information that is important to awarding a consistent GCSE grade. On that basis it was agreed that it would not be useful to use further resource to pursue these models as part of the pilot.

It is not possible to disaggregate the specific cost of the work done on the embedded models as part of this work.

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) GCSEs, (b) GNVQs and (c) vocational GCSE examinations have been sat by school pupils in each of the last 10 years. [172811]

Jim Knight: The information required is in the following table:


9 Jan 2008 : Column 651W
GCSEs GNVQs( 1) Vocational GCSEs( 2)

1997/98

4,626,700

6,989

1998/99

4,718,300

11,364

1999/2000

4,718,100

14,266

2000/01

4,944,000

20,850

2001/02

4,957,600

67,055

2002/03

5,030,700

91,965

2003/04

5,137,600

48,444

106,170

2004/05

5,053,600

67,559

141,114

2005/06

5,060,500

80,197

158,350

2006/07(3)

4,633,000

64,888

146,993

(1 )Figures include GNVQ passes only.
(2 )Vocational GCSEs began in 2003/04.
(3 )Figures for 2006/07 are provisional. Schools get the opportunity to amend their results before the revised data is published in January 2008.
Note:
The figures for 2003/04 onwards relate to all pupils at the end of key stage 4. Figures before this relate to pupils who are 15-years-old at the start of each academic year, i.e. on 31 August.

General Certificate of Secondary Education: Standards

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what his most recent target is for the proportion of pupils achieving five A* to C GCSEs by 2020; and if he will make a statement. [176695]

Jim Knight: The Children's Plan, launched on 11 December, sets out a series of world class ambitions for what we can and should achieve for children by 2020. These include a goal that every young person should have the skills for adult life and further study, with at least 90 per cent. achieving the equivalent of five higher level GCSEs by age 19.

In drawing up the plan we listened to parents, teachers and professionals, as well as to children and young people themselves. They told us what they thought was working, and what more they thought needed to be done. Over the next year, we will be consulting widely on whether the goals in the plan represent the right national ambitions.

General Certificate of Secondary Education: Welfare Tax Credits

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will estimate how many and what proportion of 15-year-olds, whose parents were claiming tax credits, attained five GCSE passes at A*-C, including English and mathematics in 2007. [177155]

Jim Knight: We do not hold the information required to answer this question. However, the Statistical First Release on pupil characteristics has information on free school meal eligibility. The link below provides this:

Literacy: Lincolnshire

Shona McIsaac: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what percentage of children met the Government’s literacy
9 Jan 2008 : Column 652W
and numeracy targets in (a) North East Lincolnshire and (b) North Lincolnshire in each of the last five years. [176888]

Jim Knight: The Government have set ambitious public service agreement (PSA) targets for the proportion of pupils nationally that should achieve the expected levels for their age in English and mathematics at the end of Key Stages 2 and 3.

The expected level of achievement at age 11 (the end of Key Stage 2) is Level 4. The Government’s PSA target is for 85 per cent. of pupils to achieve level 4 or above in English and mathematics by 2006 with this level of performance sustained to 2008.

The following table gives the percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or more in Key Stage 2 English tests in North East Lincolnshire, North Lincolnshire and all English maintained schools.

North East Lincolnshire North Lincolnshire England (maintained only)

2002/03

69

72

72

2003/04

77

76

77

2004/05

79

79

79

2005/06

75

78

79

2006/07

77

80

80


The following table gives the percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or more in Key Stage 2 Mathematics tests in North East Lincolnshire, North Lincolnshire and all English maintained schools.

North East Lincolnshire North Lincolnshire England (maintained only)

2002/03

72

70

72

2003/04

72

72

74

2004/05

75

75

75

2005/06

75

74

76

2006/07

75

76

77


The expected level of achievement at age 14 (the end of Key Stage 3) is Level 5. The Government’s PSA target is for 85 per cent. of pupils to achieve level 5 or above in English and in mathematics by 2007 with this level of performance sustained to 2008.

The following table gives the percentage of pupils achieving level 5 or more in Key Stage 3 English tests in North East Lincolnshire, North Lincolnshire and all English maintained schools.

North East Lincolnshire North Lincolnshire England (maintained only)

2002/03

61

69

69

2003/04

62

71

74

2004/05

69

71

74

2005/06

62

70

73

2006/07

67

72

74



9 Jan 2008 : Column 653W

The following table gives the percentage of pupils achieving level 5 or more in Key Stage 3 Mathematics tests in North East Lincolnshire, North Lincolnshire and all English maintained schools.

North East Lincolnshire North Lincolnshire England (maintained only)

2002/03

62

72

71

2003/04

67

72

73

2004/05

69

75

74

2005/06

72

77

77

2006/07

69

76

76


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