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21 Jan 2008 : Column 1690W—continued


All figures exclude information technology (some is refurbished and resold; the rest is dismantled and disposed of in accordance with legislation)

Figures are not directly comparable from one year to another. Staff have moved from buildings where waste collected by departmental contractors to buildings managed by other Government Department (who include our staff in their returns). In addition, in some buildings waste streams have been added to what was previously collected under the departmental contract.

Figures for earlier years are less reliable than more recent figures.

Figures include the main departmental London estate, and departmental agencies.

The 2006 report is available at: www.sd-commission. org.uk/sdig2006/ and the 6th annual report is due to be published in spring 2008.

Departmental Standards

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to paragraph 11, page 33 of his Department’s resource accounts for 2006-07, to what extent each of his Department’s five assurance standards were met in 2006-07, broken down by directorate. [178275]

Mr. Bradshaw: The Statement of Internal Control sets out how the Department has met the assurance standards and the control issues identified.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to paragraph 33, page 36 of his Department’s resource accounts for 2006-07, what the 199 significant control issues were, broken down by reporting trust. [178280]

Mr. Bradshaw: The 199 significant control issues reported by national health service trusts and primary care trusts in their Statements of Internal Control for 2006-07, and referred to in the Department’s resource accounts for 2006-07, a copy of their statements has been placed in the Library.

Family Practitioner Services: Barnet

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress has been made in arrangements for GPs in Barnet to make direct referrals for diagnostic services; and if he will make a statement. [178165]

Mr. Bradshaw: This information is not collected centrally.

It is for local health communities to work together to decide the best setting to deliver diagnostic services for their patients. However, direct access to diagnostics from primary care can help with delivery of the 18 weeks target by improving the quality of referrals to secondary care by reducing the number of unnecessary referrals to secondary care outpatient clinics, and
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removing unnecessary steps from the patient pathway. A number of initiatives are underway to support direct access diagnostics.

The payment by results for 2008-09 contains a number of indicative tariffs to support unbundling of services, for example for imaging scans. Unbundling diagnostics provides incentives for primary care trusts to commission diagnostics via direct access prior to referral.

The 18 weeks team have been working with clinical colleagues to develop commissioning pathways to support commissioners in challenging existing practice and transform services. The pathways, developed in conjunction with clinical colleagues, are based on best practice and include direct access diagnostics where this is appropriate.

Fractures

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the clinical efficacy of
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fracture liaison services to ensure patient concordance with medicines regimens which help prevent secondary fracture. [179181]

Ann Keen: We have made no assessment of the clinical efficacy of fracture liaison services.

Gastrointestinal System: Health Services

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients with each type of gastroenterological condition were seen by a consultant within 18 weeks of referral in the latest period for which figures are available. [178047]

Ann Keen: Referral to treatment data are not collected at a procedure level. The following table shows October 2007 referral to treatment data for the treatment function gastroenterology.

Referral to treatment data October 2007
C ompleted within 18 weeks
Treatment function Pathway type Total number of completed pathways in October Total (with known referral date) Number of pathways Percentage of pathways

Gastroenterology

Admitted

10,881

7,905

6,699

85

Non-admitted

16,816

15,581

11,206

72

Notes:
1. “Admitted patients” those admitted to hospital for definitive treatment, usually an operation.
2. “Non-admitted patients” those treated or otherwise without requiring admission e.g. those treated as out-patients.

Health Services: Overseas Visitors

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he will publish his review of the rules governing access to the NHS by foreign nationals. [174315]

Dawn Primarolo: On 7 March 2007 the Home Office published Enforcing the rules: A Strategy to ensure and enforce compliance with our immigration laws. The DH is working with the Home Office on this review.

When the review is completed, the Home Office will be holding a public consultation in spring 2008.

Health Services: Screening

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which organisations were consulted on screening for (a) heart disease, (b) kidney disease, (c) stroke and (d) diabetes prior to the Prime Minister’s announcement of a new screening programme for these conditions on 8 January 2008. [178255]

Ann Keen: When proposals for a vascular screening programme have been developed further the Department intends to consult with various stakeholders including the National Screening Committee, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and a number of interested groups such as leading voluntary groups.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate his Department has made of (a) the number of additional medical personnel, (b) the quantity of additional scanning equipment and (c) the increased analysis laboratory capacity required to deliver his Department’s screening programme for (i) heart disease, (ii) kidney disease, (iii) stroke and (iv) diabetes. [178257]

Ann Keen: These assessments form part of the modelling work on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a systematic, population-wide vascular risk assessment and management programme that is currently being carried out by the Department’s analysts.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the cost of an individual screening for (a) heart disease, (b) kidney disease, (c) stroke and (d) diabetes. [178258]

Ann Keen: There is a departmental project currently under way to assess costs and benefits of an integrated, systematic population-wide vascular risk screening programme.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department plans to spend in each financial year until 2010-11 on advertising and education campaigns to encourage people to take up the offer of screening for (a) heart disease, (b) kidney disease, (c) stroke and (d) diabetes. [178260]

Ann Keen: The exact nature of a vascular risk assessment and management programme is still the subject of developmental work. It would be premature at this stage to set out specific spending figures on advertising and education campaigns.


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Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate his Department has made of the likely take-up of (a) universal and (b) targeted screening programme for (i) heart disease, (ii) kidney disease, (iii) stroke and (iv) diabetes. [178261]

Ann Keen: Take-up rates for a new service are, by their nature, unpredictable and will depend on the details of what is offered to whom, which will be worked out in part in discussions with stakeholders. However, a range of assumptions about likely take-up levels of a vascular risk assessment programme will be modelled into the analytical work being undertaken by the Department. Assumptions about likely take-up will also form part of the discussions we will have with stakeholders about the development of the practical aspects of the programme.

HealthSpace

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients have registered with HealthSpace in each year since it was established. [179129]

Mr. Bradshaw: Information is not held in the form requested. As at 10 January 2008, there were some 26,300 HealthSpace accounts.

Hospital Treatment Target

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what progress is being made towards the 18 week hospital treatment target in Hendon; [178064]


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(2) what progress has been made in meeting the 18 week hospital treatment target for patients in the Barnet primary care trust area; and if he will make a statement. [179014]

Mr. Bradshaw: The information requested is not held centrally. However, referral to treatment (RTT) times for admitted pathways (RTT times for patients whose 18 week clock stopped during the month with an inpatient/day case admission), and for non-admitted pathways (RTT times for patients whose 18 week clock stopped during the month for reasons other than an inpatient/day case admission) in the Barnet primary care trust area from January 2007 to October 2007 can be found in the following table.

By December 2008, no one should have to wait more than 18 weeks from the time they are referred by their general practitioner (GP) to the start of their treatment unless it is clinically appropriate to do so or they choose to wait.

The national health service began measuring waits for GP referral to start of consultant led treatment from January 2007. This allows the Department and the NHS to monitor and track progress towards the maximum 18 week wait.

RTT data published on 10 January 2008 show that in October 2007, 60 per cent. of admitted patients waited no more than 18 weeks for their treatment following the initial referral by their GP—an improvement on snapshot figures released in December 2006, which showed that 35 per cent. of patients received treatment within 18 weeks. The figure for non-admitted patients for October was 77 per cent.

Referral to treatment data for Barnet PCT
January 2007 February 2007 March 2007 April 2007 May 2007 June 2007 July 2007 August 2007 September 2007 October 2007

Admitted pathways

Percentage of pathways completed within 18 weeks

35

34

35

35

43

36

36

38

42

54

Data completeness

48

51

47

41

36

75

527

70

Non-admitted pathways

Percentage of pathways completed within 18 weeks

60

88

69

68

68

68

66

65

66

62

Data completeness

69

57

52

Source:
Monthly Referral To Treatment Data Collection.

Hospitals: Waiting Lists

Mark Simmonds: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will estimate the cost to the NHS of collecting figures for (a) inpatient and (b) outpatient waiting times in 2007-08. [175571]

Mr. Bradshaw: There are no figures available on the monetary cost of collecting figures on waiting times. However, the review of central returns process estimates the burden in terms of person years. The current estimated burden for providing monthly and quarterly inpatient and outpatient waiting times figures is 10.8 person years in total, 6.6 years for outpatients and 4.2 years for inpatients.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Drugs

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the drug budget for the treatment of inflammatory bowel conditions is in (a) England and (b) each strategic health authority area in 2007-08. [178036]


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Ann Keen: Primary care and national health service trust drugs budgets are not determined centrally and therefore there are no drugs budgets for the treatment of inflammatory bowel conditions centrally. Trusts are responsible for setting their own budgets, decisions on the level of funding will depend on local priorities.


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