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24 Jan 2008 : Column 2219W—continued


Barnet Hospital: Standards

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the quality of (a) nursing care and (b) cleaning services at Barnet hospital. [177994]

Ann Keen: The quality of nursing care and cleaning services are matters for the local national health service.

On 5 July 2007, the Healthcare Commission (HCC) issued Barnet and Chase Farm hospitals NHS Trust with an improvement notice.

The improvement notice related to the ‘Code of Practice for the Prevention and Control of Healthcare Associated Infections’. The code outlines compulsory duties to prevent and manage healthcare-associated infections such as meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile. All NHS trusts should be compliant with these duties.

Further to a follow up visit on 31 October 2007, the HCC announced on 20 December 2007 that the trust had made improvements in infection control and was compliant with the requirements of the improvement notice that had been issued on 5 July.


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Barnet Primary Care Trust: Waiting Lists

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to reduce diagnostic waiting times for patients in Barnet primary care trust area; and if he will make a statement. [177899]

Mr. Bradshaw: Rapid accurate diagnosis is key to delivery of the 18 week target. The Department has developed three clinically-led national programmes, in imaging, endoscopy and physiological measurement, to support the national health service in reducing waiting times for diagnostic tests including residents in Barnet primary care trust (PCT).

The Independent Sector London Diagnostics scheme, offering a range of diagnostic assessments, is also available to patients in the Barnet PCT area. Diagnostics available through the London Diagnostics scheme include magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray, ultrasound, echocardiography, echocardiography (screening), electrocardiogram, blood pressure monitoring, endoscopy and phlebotomy.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the (a) average and (b) longest waiting time was in the Barnet Primary Care Trust area for (i) operations for (A) cataracts, (B) heart disease, (C) hip replacement, (ii) cancer, (iii) an MRI scan and (iv) a CT scan in (1) 2006-07, (2) 2007-08 to date and (3) 1997; in each category of treatment how many procedures were conducted; and if he will make a statement. [177930]

Mr. Bradshaw: The following tables show the average (median) and longest waiting times and total admissions in the Barnet Primary Care Trust (PCT) area for the trauma and orthopaedic speciality (including hip replacements) the ophthalmology speciality (including cataract surgery), and the cardiothoracic speciality (including heart surgery) for 2006-07, 2007-08 to date and 1996-97, and waiting times and total activity for MRI and CT scans for 2006-07, 2007-08 to date. Figures for waiting times and activity for MRI and CT scans in 1997 is not available.

Statistics on average waiting times for cancer patients and average waiting times for different types of cancer treatment are not collected centrally. Cancer waiting times’ standards of a maximum wait of 31 days from diagnosis to first cancer treatment, and a maximum wait of 62 days from urgent referral for suspected cancer to first cancer treatment were introduced for all cancer patients from December 2005. In the last quarter (July to September 2007) national performance against these standards was 99.7 per cent. and 97.2 per cent. respectively. This information is not available by individual PCTs.

Today waiting times are at a record low; patients can expect a maximum 13 week wait for their first out-patient appointment and a maximum six month wait for an operation.

Latest data show that over half of admitted patients (patients who require admission to hospital for treatment) and over three quarters of non-admitted patients are treated within 18 weeks.


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24 Jan 2008 : Column 2222W
In-patient waiting statistics concerning the trauma and orthopaedic specialty for the Barnet PCT area
Month ending Area Median waiting time (weeks) Longest wait Total admissions

2007-08

September

Barnet PCT

7.3

22-23 weeks

2,701

2006-07

March

Barnet PCT

7.1

22-23 weeks

2,747

1996-97

March

Barnet HA

18.0

18-20 months

1,825


In-patient waiting statistics concerning the cardiothoracic surgery specialty for the Barnet PCT area
Month ending Area Median waiting time (weeks) Longest wait Total admissions

2007-08

September

Barnet PCT

n/a

10-11 weeks

49

2006-07

March

Barnet PCT

n/a

8-9 weeks

162

1996-97

March

Barnet HA

13.76

9-11 months

283


In-patient waiting statistics concerning the ophthalmology specialty for the Barnet PCT area
Month ending Area Median waiting time (weeks) Longest wait Total admissions

2007-08

September

Barnet PCT

5

22-23 weeks

979

2006-07

March

Barnet PCT

5.5

25-26 weeks

1,691

1996-97

March

Barnet HA

14.32

12-14 months

1,484


Diagnostic waiting statistics concerning MRI scans in the Barnet PCT area
Month ending Area Median waiting time (weeks) Longest wait Total activity

2007-08

October

Barnet PCT

2.8

12-13 weeks

3,914

2006-07

March

Barnet PCT

4.5

31-32 weeks

4,928


Diagnostic waiting statistics concerning CT scans in the Barnet PCT a rea
Month ending Area Median waiting time (weeks) Longest wait Total activity

2007-08

October

Barnet PCT

2.4

12-13 weeks

5,394

2006-07

March

Barnet PCT

3.2

11-12 weeks

8,011

Notes:
1. The data are reported as a snapshot at a point in time. For this purpose the latest available period within the financial year is used.
2. The figures for trauma and orthopaedics, cardiothoracic and ophthalmology specialities show the median waiting times for patients still waiting for admission at the end of the period stated. In-patient waiting times are measure from decision to admit by the consultant to admission to hospital.
3. Median waiting times are calculated from aggregate data, rather than patient level data, and therefore are only estimates of the position on average waits. This should be taken into account when interpreting the data.
4. The parliamentary question states heart, hip and cataract operations. These are sub-sets of the cardiothoracic, trauma and orthopaedic and ophthalmology specialities respectively.
5. Data are not collected for the 1997 period for MRI and CT scan waiting times.
6. For the cardiothoracic speciality, when there is less than 50 waiters in the category, no median has been calculated as the small data set may lead to statistical inaccuracies.
7. Activity numbers are provided for MRI and CT scans, and admission data are provided for the trauma and orthopaedics, cardiothoracic and ophthalmology specialities. These terms both directly relate to the number of procedures undertaken.

Bexley Care Trust: Cancer

Mr. Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much was spent by Bexley care trust on cancer services in each of the last three years. [178078]

Mr. Bradshaw: Expenditure by Bexley care trust on cancers and tumours for the past three financial years is shown in the following table. Figures were collected as part of the programme budgeting returns.

Bexley care trust net expenditure on ‘cancer and tumours’
Financial reporting year Net expenditure (£000)

2004-05

15,978

2005-06

16,224

2006-07(1)

15,690

(1) Due to definitional changes in data, it may not be appropriate to compare expenditure in 2006-07 with earlier years.

Chiropody

Ben Chapman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he plans to collect centrally information on (a) the allocation by primary care trusts of funding to chiropody services and (b) the number of chiropody clinics. [179647]

Ann Keen: There are no central plans to collect information about funding for chiropody services or the number of chiropody clinics. It is for primary care trusts in partnership with local stakeholders to determine how best to use their funds to meet national and local priorities for improving health and to commission services accordingly. This process provides the means for addressing local needs within the health community, including the provision of chiropody.


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Death: Barnet

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress has been made in improving mortality rates in Barnet for (a) cancer, (b) heart disease and (c) stroke; and if he will make a statement. [178069]

Ann Keen: Cancer mortality rates can be found in the following table, which gives the age-standardised mortality rate from cancer, for all persons aged under 75 years in Barnet for the years 2002-06:

Age-standardised mortality rate from cancer( 1) , all persons aged under 75 years( 2) , in England, strategic health authorities and primary care organisation( 3) , 2002-06( 4)
Rate per 100,000 (persons)
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Barnet

100

105

105

101

99

(1) Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes COO to C97.
(2) Age-standardised rates are used to allow comparison between populations which may contain different proportions of people of different ages.
(3) Based on boundaries as of 2007. The 152 primary care organisations include 148 primary care trusts (PCTs), and four care organisations (COs).
(4) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

The Department is committed to reducing the mortality rate from cancer. Major progress has been made over the past 10 years and especially since the publication of the National Health Service Cancer Plan, which set out the first ever comprehensive strategy to tackle cancer and was the first time any Government had drawn up a major programme of action linking prevention, diagnosis, treatment, care and research. Significant achievements include:

With regard to heart disease and stroke, the information requested is not held centrally. However, the Department’s target as set out in “Our Healthier Nation” is to reduce deaths from cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease and stroke and related diseases) by 40 per cent. in people under 75 by 2010 has been met five years early. The mortality rate has fallen 40.3 per cent. between 2004-06 over the 1995-97 baseline.

Dental Services: Barnet

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to improve access to NHS dentists in Barnet; and if he will make a statement. [177987]


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Ann Keen: The dental reforms implemented in 2006 gave primary care trusts (PCTs), for the first time, the responsibility for providing or commissioning dental services in their area. It is for PCTs to assess local needs, review current service provision and develop services to meet local needs. Increasing the number of patients seen within national health service dental services is now a formal priority in the NHS Operating Framework for 2008-09 and we have supported this with a very substantial 11 per cent. uplift in overall allocations to PCTs from 1 April 2008.


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