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28 Jan 2008 : Column 178W—continued


Staff in Schools: Enfield

Joan Ryan: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many teachers have been employed in Enfield, North constituency in each of the last 10 years; and how many were employed in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools; [180936]

(2) how many teaching assistants have been employed in the London borough of Enfield in each of the last 10 years; and how many were employed in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools. [180937]

Jim Knight: The following table provides the full-time equivalent number of teachers employed in local authority maintained nursery/primary and secondary schools in Enfield, North constituency and England, January 1998 to 2007.

Full-time equivalent number of teachers employed in local authority maintained nursery/primary and secondary schools in Enfield, North constituency and England: January 1998 to 2007
Teachers
Nursery/Primary Secondary
January of each year Enfield, North constituency England Enfield, North constituency England

1998

380

184,480

560

184,470

1999

380

185,800

560

186,310

2000

400

187,000

560

188,380

2001

410

189,690

570

193,340

2002

430

193,090

600

200,450

2003

420

191,090

610

203,920

2004

430

188,740

620

205,820

2005

430

188,110

650

209,040

2006

460

190,480

660

210,610

2007

440

190,290

680

210,220

Note:
Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
Source:
School Census

The following table provides the full-time equivalent number of teaching assistants employed in local authority maintained nursery/primary and secondary schools employed in the London borough of Enfield and England: January 1998 to 2007.


28 Jan 2008 : Column 179W

28 Jan 2008 : Column 180W
Full-time equivalent number of teaching assistants employed in local authority maintained nursery/primary and secondary schools in the London borough of Enfield local authority and England: January 1998 to 2007
Teaching Assistants( 1)
Nursery/Primary Secondary
January of each year London borough of Enfield England London borough of Enfield England

1998

200

44,830

10

8,970

1999

200

46,650

20

10,590

2000

390

53,380

30

12,450

2001

460

65,500

30

15,470

2002

610

71,780

90

19,530

2003

650

82,280

100

22,260

2004

720

89,160

110

25,340

2005

770

97,910

140

29,980

2006

840

99,040

170

33,490

2007

940

105,770

190

35,650

(1) Teaching assistant figures include special needs support staff and minority ethnic pupil support staff.
Note:
Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
Source:
School Census

Teachers

Anne Main: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what his Department’s definition of a bad teacher is. [177026]

Jim Knight: Performance management arrangements, introduced for teachers in England, in September 2007, are designed to establish a clear and consistent process of planning and assessment so that teachers and head teachers understand what is expected of them, and that support teachers and head teachers in addressing their professional development needs. The revised arrangements introduce a more structured approach to the planning meeting at the beginning of the year, including clarity about how performance will be assessed at the end.

In order for performance management to operate in a fair and transparent way, teachers must know what is required of them before any assessment can be made. The framework of professional standards for teachers, introduced in September 2007, helps to provide this context. The standards are statements of a teacher’s professional attributes; professional knowledge and understanding, and professional skills. They provide clarity of the expectations at each career stage and support teachers in identifying their professional development needs. The framework for standards will, therefore, provide a backdrop to the revised performance management arrangements.

Effective management, clear expectations and appropriate support are key factors in addressing weaknesses in performance. Ongoing professional dialogue will enable any such issues to be identified early, thereby avoiding the need for formal capability procedures in most cases. Where a teacher’s capability is still in question after all normal avenues have been exhausted then formal capability procedures should be instigated, in line with locally agreed practice.

Teachers: Stress

Paul Rowen: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many days of teacher absence were caused by stress-related illnesses in each local education authority in each of the last five years. [179657]

Jim Knight: The information requested is not available by type of illness.


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