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7 Feb 2008 : Column 1432W—continued


National Offender Management Service( 1)
Financial year Number of contracts awarded to PWC Net value (£ 000 )

2000-01

n/a

2001-02

n/a

2002-03

n/a

2003-04

n/a

2004-05

0

0

2005-06

0

0

2006-07

3

224

n/a = Not available.
(1) Information not held prior to 2004.

HM Prison Service( 1)
Financial year Number of contracts awarded to PWC Net value (£ 000 )

2000-01

n/a

2001-02

n/a

2002-03

n/a

2003-04

n/a

2004-05

1

75

2005-06

0

0

2006-07

1

104

n/a = Not available.
(1) Information not held prior to 2004.

Ministry of Justice
Financial year Number of contracts awarded to PWC Net value (£ 000 )

2007-08 (April to September)

4

202


7 Feb 2008 : Column 1433W

Prison and Probation Service: Wales

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the timetable is for each element in the change programme for the new structure for prison and probation services in Wales. [184711]

Mr. Hanson: We announced on January 29 that we would merge the office of the Director of Offender Management Wales with the HMPS Area Office for Wales on April 1. It will be for the Director of Offender Management to decide the timetable for any further action needed to consolidate those changes after that date. The overall timetable for the transition from probation boards to probation trusts remains unaffected by the announcement on January 29. There is ongoing consultation/dialogue which will continue as reform is implemented.

Prisoners

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders who come from Wales and are (a) in prison and (b) the subject of community penalties are subject to the end to end offender management process. [184671]

Mr. Hanson: The information is as follows:

The information on prisoners returning to Wales is not recorded centrally and has been calculated from probation area returns to the Director of Offender Management in Wales.

Prisoners Release

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people of (a) Jamaican, (b) Nigerian, (c) Vietnamese and (d) Chinese nationality were released from prison in England in each of the last five years. [184617]

Mr. Hanson: Figures for the numbers of Jamaican, Nigerian, Vietnamese and Chinese nationals discharged from determinate sentences on completion of sentence or on licence, from all prison establishments in England between 2002 and 2006 can be found in the following table:

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

China

40

30

110

250

450

Jamaica

690

1,100

1,190

800

490

Nigeria

180

230

260

350

460

Vietnam

40

50

50

90

80

Note:
Excludes discharges following recall after release on licence, non-criminals, persons committed to custody for non-payment of a fine.

7 Feb 2008 : Column 1434W

For the proportion of total prisoners who are foreign nationals, Council of Europe data on foreign national prisoners held in other major western countries reveal much higher proportions, for example in Austria (43 per cent.), Spain (33 per cent.), Germany (28 per cent.) and France (21 per cent.) than the figure for England and Wales (14 per cent.), based on 2006 population data.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Prisoners: Taxis

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 29 January 2008, Official Report, column 305W, on prisoners: taxis, how much the Prison Service has spent on taxis in each of the last three years. [184570]

Maria Eagle: Taxis are not routinely used for transporting prisoners to and from court or for inter-prison transfers. However, they are used for a variety of individual and short-notice journeys for prisoners, subject to risk assessment, where prison or other transport is not available and where it is cost-effective to do so. This can include journeys for medical treatment where an ambulance is not appropriate, urgent transfers between prisons, and travel to work or community placements where there is no suitable public transport. Taxi fares are normally paid through an account and the costs of journeys undertaken by prisoners cannot be identified separately from official journeys undertaken by staff.

Carter Review Team

Mr. Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice who the members of the Carter review team are; what qualifications each holds; and what employment experience each has had. [178764]

Mr. Hanson: In his report ‘Securing the future: Proposals for the efficient and sustainable use of custody in England and Wales’, Lord Carter of Coles thanked his team, whom he named. They were Jeremy Marlow, Daniel Flury, Alex Furse, Ian Maris, Camilla Hamilton, Caleb Deeks, Christine Dickinson, Lorna Maden, Nisha de Silva, Jenny Maresh, Ruth Allan, Helen Judge and Melissa Case. Some of these individuals worked full time on Lord Carter’s review while others provided information and analysis as required.

It is not the Government’s practice to provide personal details about individual officials. However, the team’s background included experience of business planning and development, research and analysis, and policy development and delivery. This experience was gained within a variety of organisations including HM Prison Service, the National Offender Management Service, HM Treasury and the private sector.


7 Feb 2008 : Column 1435W

Prisons: Chelmsford

Mr. Burns: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 1 February 2008, Official Report, column 725W, what assessment he has made of the reasons why the cost per prisoner per annum at HMP Chelmsford is £2,397 above the national average; and if he will make a statement. [185266]

Mr. Hanson: As with all average figures, it follows that a number of the prisons in England and Wales will cost more per prisoner place than the average and a number will cost less. The level of funding in establishments is dependent on a number of factors including building type and location, the role of the establishment and mix of regimes, and the make-up of the population. Chelmsford has a significant young offender population and this contributes to the higher cost per prisoner. At a cost per prisoner of £29,134 Chelmsford falls at approximately halfway between the average cost per prisoner for a male local prison (£25,265) and the average cost per prisoner in a male closed young offender institution (£32,124).

Regional Offender Manager: Wales

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the responsibilities of the Regional Offender Manager is in Wales; and what the responsibilities of the directors of offender management are expected to be. [184668]

Mr. Hanson: The current responsibilities of the Director of Offender Management in Wales include:

After April 1 the Director of Offender Management will be responsible for all the aforementioned, with the added line-management responsibility for the public sector prisons. There is ongoing consultation/dialogue which will continue as reform is implemented.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what plans he has made to facilitate the merger of the offices of the Regional Offender Manager and the Prison Service Area Manager’s office in Wales; and what account has been taken of the different geographical areas covered by those offices. [184669]

Mr. Hanson: In the run-up to April 1 2008 NOMS HQ and prison service HQ will provide the necessary logistical support to the office of the Director of Offender Management Wales and the HMPS Area Office for Wales to ensure that the transition is managed smoothly. After April 1 the re-organised NOMS HQ will support the re-organised office of the Director of Offender Management in consolidating the changes as appropriate.


7 Feb 2008 : Column 1436W

Currently, the office of the Director of Offender Management Wales is responsible for commissioning services across Wales and for contract management of HMP Pare. The HMPS Area Office is responsible for managing the public sector prisons which are in South Wales. The combined office will be responsible for support to all Offender Management services across Wales. There is ongoing consultation/dialogue which will continue as reform is implemented.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many staff are currently employed in (a) the Regional Offender Manager’s office and (b) the Prison Service Area Manager’s office in Wales; and what the projected staff numbers are in these two offices after the restructuring on 1 April. [184670]

Mr. Hanson: 17 staff are currently employed by the Director of Offender Management Wales’ office, and 18 staff are currently employed by the Prison Service Area Manager’s office in Wales.

It is not possible at this stage to say how many staff will be employed in the office of the Director of Offender Management after the restructuring on 1 April. It will be for the Director of Offender Management, supported by NOMS HQ, to determine exactly how the new merged office will be structured. There is ongoing consultation/dialogue which will continue as reform is implemented.

Young Offenders: Injuries

Dr. Vis: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether the records kept on injuries in young offender institutions include information on (a) the nature of the injury sustained, (b) whether oxygen was administered, (c) whether the injury resulted in hospitalisation and (d) whether any subsequent medical treatment was required beyond that administered immediately after the injury was sustained. [184577]

Mr. Hanson: Data on assaults, restraints and self harm incidents across the under 18 estate are collected by the Youth Justice Board (YJB). The data show the number of incidents and the severity of the injury (minor or serious). Serious injuries are those requiring hospital treatment. The nature of the injury and whether subsequent medical treatment was required is not recorded by the YJB.

The Prison Service’s Incident Reporting System holds more detailed information on self-harm injuries in young offender institutions. This includes the nature of the injury and the type of treatment administered. However, the narrative form of this information precludes routine statistical analysis.

Dr. Vis: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether the recording of injuries sustained in young offender institutions and secure training centres include recording whether they were caused (a) by self-harm, (b) during restraint by prison officers, (c) during violence between detainees and (d) in an attempt at suicide. [184619]


7 Feb 2008 : Column 1437W

Mr. Hanson: The Youth Justice Board (YJB) collects data across the under-18 estate on injuries sustained as a result of self-harm, restraint and assault. An attempted suicide would be recorded as an incident of self-harm because is not always possible to know the intent behind an act of self-harm.

The Prison Service’s Incident Reporting System holds more detailed information on self-harm incidents in young offender institutions. This includes the nature of the injury, the type of treatment administered and whether the incident required hospitalisation. However, the narrative form of this information precludes routine statistical analysis.


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