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18 Feb 2008 : Column 366W—continued

—continued


Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what projection he has made of population figures in 2014. [186924]

Angela Eagle: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 18 February 2008:


18 Feb 2008 : Column 367W

Revenue and Customs: Data Protection

Mr. Chope: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer for what reason the PAYE Coding Notices for 2007-08 and 2008-09 issued by HM Revenue and Customs on 24 January 2008 in respect of Mr. Hemmings of Worthing and Mr. Wigley of Wanstrow, Somerset, were sent to a taxpayer in Christchurch, together with that taxpayer’s PAYE Coding Notice; and if he will make a statement. [186677]

Jane Kennedy: HMRC investigations have established that this was an isolated incident resulting from a manual handling error. HMRC has sent apology letters and up-to-date Coding Notices to the affected customers and requested the return of the Coding Notices sent in error.

Road Traffic Offences

Mr. Jeremy Browne: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many (a) parking tickets and (b) speeding fines were issued for vehicles used by his Department in each of the last 10 years; and what the cost to the public purse of those penalties was in each year. [183348]

Angela Eagle: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport on 5 February 2008, Official Report, columns 1014-15W.

Seized Articles

Mr. Evennett: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many seizure notices were issued by customs officials in each of the last five years. [186461]

Jane Kennedy: The information requested is not available.

Smuggling: Animal Products

Mr. Paice: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many product of animal origin detector dogs have been used at ports and airports in Great Britain in each year since 2001. [185624]

Jane Kennedy: Meat detection dogs were introduced by DEFRA in 2002, and were transferred to HMRC in 2003. The number of products of animal origin detector dogs used at ports and airports in Great Britain since 2002 is in the following table:

Number of dogs

2002

2

2003

2

2004

6

2005

10

2006

11

2007

11

2008

9


18 Feb 2008 : Column 368W

Smuggling: Drugs

John Cummings: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what volume of illegal drugs was seized at the ports of (a) Hartlepool, (b) Teesside, (c) Tyneside, (d) Wearside and (e) Seaham in each year since 2000, broken down by type of drug; and if he will make a statement. [186211]

Jane Kennedy: National information on seizures made by HM Revenue and Customs is contained in their annual reports.

Information of seizures, by location, cannot be disclosed as this would provide information of value to those seeking to circumvent HM Revenue and Customs’ controls, thereby prejudicing the prevention and detection of crime.

Smuggling: Tobacco

David Taylor: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what estimate has been made of the proportion of the illicit trade in tobacco in (a) 2005-06 and (b) 2006-07 that was in (i) manufactured cigarettes and (ii) hand rolling tobacco. [186383]

Angela Eagle: The 2005-06 estimates of the illicit trade in manufactured cigarettes and hand rolling tobacco are given in “Measuring Indirect Tax Losses—2007” published by HMRC in October 2007.

Estimates for 2006-07 will be published alongside the 2008 pre-Budget report.

Strokes: Death

Mark Hunter: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many people died as a result of a stroke in each (a) strategic health authority area, (b) primary care trust area, (c) Westminster constituency, (d) English region and (e) socio-demographic group in each year since 2002. [185823]

Angela Eagle: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply. The reply has been placed in the Library.

Tax Credits

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer pursuant to the answer of 23 January 2008, Official Report, column 2101W, on tax credits, what proportion of complaints received replies in (a) under one week, (b) between one and two weeks, (c) between two and three weeks, (d) between four and five weeks and (e) over five weeks in each of the last three years. [183812]

Jane Kennedy: Although HM Revenue and Customs aim to reply to the majority of letters within three weeks, following the administrative issue I referred to in my statement of 25 July 2007, Official Report, columns 62-63WS, some parts of HMRC's tax credits business have, regrettably, been subject to delays. I am not satisfied with this performance and the Tax Credit Office is working hard to improve the speed of responses. Around 40 per cent. of replies issued in December 2007 were sent within three weeks of receiving the correspondence.


18 Feb 2008 : Column 369W

For the proportion of complaints sent a full reply for the periods requested I refer the hon. Member to the following table:

Cleared within Percentage clearance Cumulative percentage

2005-06

1 week

5

5

1 to 2 weeks

14

19

2 to 3 weeks

14

33

3 to 4 weeks

10

43

4 to 5 weeks

5

48

Over 5 weeks

52

100

2006-07

1 week

4

4

1 to 2 weeks

12

16

2 to 3 weeks

13

29

3 to 4 weeks

13

42

4 to 5 weeks

11

53

Over 5 weeks

47

100

2007-08(1)

1 week

5

5

1 to 2 weeks

8

13

2 to 3 weeks

10

23

3 to 4 weeks

9

32

4 to 5 weeks

9

41

Over 5 weeks

59

100

(1) To 31 December 2007.

Taxation

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Stafford of 29 January 2008, Official Report, column 291W, on taxation, what levels of need his Department attributes to (a) a single person and (b) a married couple with (i) one, (ii) two and (iii) three children for the purposes of determining tax credit entitlements. [185666]

Jane Kennedy: Tax credit entitlement is determined according to family income and the number of children in a family. A single earner family earning £10,000 a year is entitled to tax credits of £90.93 per week with one child, £126.28 per week with two children and £161.63 per week with three children. This is in addition to child benefit payable for each child.

Taxation: Gambling

Mr. Betts: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the effective tax rate is for (a) bingo clubs, (b) casinos, (c) local betting offices and (d) adult gaming centres. [185703]

Angela Eagle: It is not possible to give an accurate estimate of the effective tax rate on each premises type as it depends on a range of factors. These include: the types of gambling activity each type of premises offers; the tax liability each gambling activity incurs; and the relative mix of these different activities. However, the average effective rates of taxation on bingo, casino gaming and gaming machines are between 20 and 25 per cent. The rate of general betting duty is 15 per cent.


18 Feb 2008 : Column 370W

Mr. Ellwood: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what gambling activities are subject to (a) value-added tax and (b) gross profits tax; [185843]

(2) how much value-added tax was collected from adult gaming centres in England and Wales in (a) 2006 and (b) 2007. [185954]

Angela Eagle: VAT is chargeable on admission fees to premises where gambling takes place, club subscriptions, the takings from gaming machines, and fees for the playing of a game of chance where no prize is offered.

With certain exceptions, VAT is also chargeable on the provision of facilities for the playing of any games of chance for a prize, including bingo participation and session fees.

General betting duty, pool betting duty, bingo duty, gaming duty and remote gaming duty are all levied on a gross profits tax basis.

HM Revenue and Customs does not collect data on the amount of VAT paid on individual goods and services.

Taxation: Property

Robert Neill: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will place in the Library a copy of the presentation made and handouts produced by the representative of the Valuation Office Agency entitled, Towards modernisation in property tax systems: the British experience, during the International Seminar on Property Taxation in Salvador da Bahia, Brazil on 22 November 2007; and what the cost to the public purse of attendance at this seminar was. [183273]

Jane Kennedy: The Valuation Office Agency did not send an official representative to this seminar and no cost to the public purse was incurred.

Taxation: Second Homes

Ms Buck: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the estimated cost to the public purse was of tax exemptions to (a) second home owners and (b) buy-to-let landlords in each year since 2000. [185972]

Jane Kennedy: No tax exemptions are available for either second homes owners or buy-to-let landlords, and therefore there are no costs to the public purse.

Taxation: Sports

Michael Gove: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what criteria were used to classify (a) angling, (b) ballooning, (c) billiards, pool and snooker, (d) crossbow, (e) rifle and pistol shooting, (f) flying, (g) gliding, (h) motor sports and (i) parachuting as sports which do not qualify for a tax exemption; [185325]

(2) for what reason community amateur sports clubs as defined by HM Revenue and Customs receive tax exemptions; what the criteria are for definition as a community amateur sports club; and if he will make a statement; [185326]

(3) what representations he has received on changing the number of animal racing activities which are eligible for tax exemption; and if he will make a statement. [186190]


18 Feb 2008 : Column 371W

Jane Kennedy: Sports clubs that meet certain criteria are able to register with HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) as community amateur sports clubs (CASCs) and enjoy a range of tax reliefs. It is not however for HMRC to decide which activities are eligible sports for the CASC scheme. Eligible sports are defined by Treasury Order, by reference to the Sports Councils' list of recognised activities. The list can be accessed at

HMRC registered CASCs are eligible for tax reliefs because the Government recognise the benefits of community participation in sport and the benefits that CASCs can bring in terms of health, community building and crime reduction. Because of these benefits, the Government provide tax exemptions to support those amateur sports clubs that do make a positive contribution to their local communities and to encourage local communities to support their CASCs.

The key criteria for registration as a CASC are that a club must;


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