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18 Feb 2008 : Column 381W—continued


Departmental Marketing

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform pursuant to the answer of 24 January 2008, Official Report, column 2187W, on departmental marketing, what the cost of the re-branding exercise was. [184887]

Mr. Thomas: The rebranding exercise in the previous answer refers to the costs incurred in setting up BERR. An analysis of these costs dated 21 November 2007 showed them to be £218,063. These included stationery, rebranding and IT changes, including revised email addresses, new signage, web-based changes, new logo and print costs (including the re-launch of BERR on 1 November 2007) and the anticipated cost of branding guidelines.

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform pursuant to the answer of 24 January 2008, Official Report, column 2187W, on departmental marketing, whether any external contracts were awarded to (a) run and (b) facilitate the re-branding exercise. [184888]

Mr. Thomas: No external contracts were awarded to run or facilitate the rebranding exercise. It was run and managed by BERR staff.

Departmental Telephone Services

Julia Goldsworthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what telephone contact centres his Department is responsible for. [173133]

Mr. Thomas: The Department’s central records do not contain the information to answer this question. Therefore, the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform could answer this question only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Travel

Mr. Jeremy Browne: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how much his Department and its predecessors spent on travel (a) within and (b) outside the UK for officials in each of the last 10 years; and what percentage of his Department’s overall expenditure was spent on such travel in each of those years. [181638]


18 Feb 2008 : Column 382W

Mr. Thomas: The total amount spent on travel (a) within and (b) outside the UK by BERR and its predecessor, the DTI, in each of the last 10 years was:

£
Outside UK Within UK

1998-99

5,019,971

n/a

1999-2000

5,291,063

n/a

2000-01

5,470,024

n/a

2001-02

4,912,785

n/a

2002-03

5,583,825

4,235,910

2003-04

4,260,257

4,310,326

2004-05

5,483,903

3,976,125

2005-06

5,601,629

3,709,167

2006-07

6,295,501

3,234,332

April 2007 to November 2007

1,752,867

2,529,628

n/a = Not available

These figures include travel, accommodation and incidental costs associated with travel.

To provide details of the percentage of the Department’s overall expenditure on such travel for each of those years would entail disproportionate costs.

Mr. Jeremy Browne: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how many overseas visits by officials in his Department took place in each of the last 10 years; which countries were visited; and how much was spent on such visits in each such year. [181614]

Mr. Thomas: The total amount spent on foreign travel by BERR and its predecessor, the DTI, in each of the last 10 years was:

£

1998-99

5,019,971

1999-2000

5,291,063

2000-01

5,470,024

2001-02

4,912,785

2002-03

5,583,825

2003-04

4,260,257

2004-05

5,483,903

2005-06

5,601,629

2006-07

6,295,501

April 2007 to November 2007

1,752,867


The Department does not separately record details of which countries were visited—to provide this information would entail disproportionate cost.

These figures include travel, accommodation and incidental costs associated with travel.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how much was spent by the former Department for Trade and Industry and his Department on expenses, travel and accommodation to Brussels in each year since 2000. [176051]

Mr. Thomas: Details of the amount spent by BERR, and previously by DTI, on travel and accommodation to Brussels are available only from June 2002 to date and are:


18 Feb 2008 : Column 383W
£
Travel Accommodation

June to December 2002

420,294

55,885

January to December 2003

630,725

15,256

January to December 2004

577,633

9,305

January to December 2005

717,260

16,587

January to December 2006

512,668

94,076

January 2007 to date

424,301

95,374


Details of expenses to Brussels are not centrally recorded. To obtain this information would entail disproportionate cost.

Employment: Discrimination

Danny Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform pursuant to the answer of 24 January 2008, Official Report, columns 2188-9W, on employment: discrimination, how many cases based wholly or partially on a complaint of age discrimination have been brought before the Employment Service Tribunal in each of the last 10 years. [185432]

Bridget Prentice: I have been asked to reply.

The collection of details on Age Discrimination cases only became a requirement from October 2006, thus information is only available from that period. From October 2006 until the end of January 2008, there were 2,514 age discrimination cases out of a total of 147,530 discrimination cases. From 2002 until October 2006, there was a total of 114,392 discrimination cases. The information is summarised in the following table.

Numbers of discrimination and age discrimination cases, 2002 until January 2008.
October 2002 to October 2006 October 2006 to January 2008 Total

Discrimination

114,392

147,530

261,922

Age discrimination

Not available

2,514

Not available

Source:
The Tribunals Service

Energy Supply: Meters

David Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform pursuant to paragraph 2.1.25 of the 2007 Energy White Paper, what ways of reducing the costs associated with pre-payment meters his Department has considered; and if he will make a statement. [185360]

Malcolm Wicks [holding answer 7 February 2008]: The costs associated with pre-payment meters reflect the higher cost of the meter itself, as well as that of the complex payment and support infrastructures required to support them, involving suppliers, meter owners and thousands of retail outlets.

Gas and electricity suppliers have been considering their tariff structures and two companies have equalised their standard credit and prepayment prices for electricity, while one offers prepayment customers a lower price for both fuels than that paid by standard credit customers. In addition, some suppliers offer social tariffs and other measures that benefit their most disadvantaged customers.


18 Feb 2008 : Column 384W

I will continue to look with Ofgem and the energy companies at ways of reducing the costs associated with pre-payment meters. I also support Ofgem’s work to promote access to cheaper payment methods, especially direct debit.

The Government will shortly set out their next steps on smart meters. Such meters could significantly reduce the cost of serving a prepayment meter customer.

Energy Technologies Institute: Finance

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what the cost to the public purse is of the Energy Technologies Institute in 2007-08. [180482]

Ian Pearson: I have been asked to reply.

The Energy Technologies Institute was legally established on 12 December 2007 as a limited liability partnership. Direct costs accrued in April to December 2007 by the public sector in support of the establishment of the ETI are estimated to amount to approximately £1,466,520. The majority of these costs will be shared with the private sector partners and off-set against public sector contributions to ETI during 2008.

Energy: Conservation

Mr. Paice: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform how much was raised by the energy efficiency commitment, broken down by energy supplier in each year since its introduction; and how much will be raised by the carbon emission reduction target on the same basis. [184951]

Mr. Woolas: I have been asked to reply.

We estimate that the first phase of EEC (2002-05) cost suppliers around £410 million and stimulated about £600 million worth of investment in energy efficiency delivering net benefits to householders in excess of £3 billion. The EEC's second phase (2005-08) is expected to cost suppliers around £1.2 billion and stimulate £400 million worth of annual investment in energy efficiency, delivering net benefits of £7.2 billion. The forthcoming CERT (2008-11) is estimated to cost energy suppliers around £2.8 billion, stimulating low carbon investment of some £4.3 billion and delivering net benefits to households worth approximately £12 billion.

Steve Webb: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what guidance and incentives are available for businesses to implement more energy efficient (a) information and communication technology equipment, (b) working practices and (c) data centres. [185412]

Mr. Woolas: I have been asked to reply.

The Carbon Trust is working with a number of companies in the information communications technology (ICT) and financial services sectors through the carbon management process, to help reduce their carbon emissions and implement energy efficient practices. This includes a number of data centres, where barriers to energy efficiency implementation include:


18 Feb 2008 : Column 385W

The Carbon Trust is in discussions with industry bodies to share understanding of energy issues in data centres, and is giving serious consideration to rolling out an industry-wide solution.

The Carbon Trust also provides a range of general guidance on the energy efficient use of office equipment, staff awareness and energy management. This is done through its customer centre, website and publications. The Carbon Trust also founded the Low Carbon Culture Company. This makes use of the Carbon Trust's experience in understanding carbon emissions to help companies reduce their carbon emissions by changing employee behaviour.

Energy: Meters

Mr. Hands: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform if he will make a statement on the replacement of consumer energy display units with smart meters; who will bear the cost of replacement; and what research his Department has carried out on using alternative meters. [184773]

Malcolm Wicks: The Government have carried out a consultation on metering and billing, including smart meters, display devices and the relationship between the two. The Government will set out the next steps on metering and billing shortly.

Mr. Benyon: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (1) when he will make the statutory instrument necessary to enable consumers of energy to request real time consumption display devices; [185983]

(2) whether the Government intend to provide free real-time energy consumption display devices to householders. [185984]

Malcolm Wicks: In August 2007, the Government consulted on a range of metering and billing proposals, including the provision of electricity display devices. The Government will shortly set out their response to the consultation, including the next steps on smart meters and display devices.


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