Previous Section Index Home Page

21 Feb 2008 : Column 1018W—continued


Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions which local authorities in London did not spend the whole of their discretionary housing payments budget in 2006-07. [185976]

Mr. Plaskitt: The London local authorities that did not spend the whole of their discretionary housing payment allocation for 2006-07 are:

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many households received discretionary housing payments in each London local authority area in 2005-06. [185977]

Mr. Plaskitt: The information is not available.

Industrial Health and Safety: Standards

Paul Rowen: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what targets the Health and Safety Executive set for reducing (a) the incidence of injury, (b) the incidence of ill health, (c) the incidence of working days lost and (d) the numbers of recorded major hazard precursor incidences in each year since 1997, broken down by region; and whether these targets were met in each year. [186680]

Mrs. McGuire: The Health and Safety Commission set three targets to reduce the incidence rates of work-related fatal and major injury, ill health and working days lost as part of its ‘Revitalising Health and Safety’ strategy launched in 2000. This was the first time HSC/E had set national targets of this sort. These were not annual targets, but cover a 10-year period to 2009-10, using 1999 to 2000 as the baseline year, and sought reductions of:

HSE's current PSA targets (2005-06 to 2007-08, using 2004-05 as a baseline) are designed to contribute to these longer term targets—aiming for a 3 per cent. reduction in work-related fatal and major injuries, 6 per cent. reduction in work-related ill health and 9 per cent. reduction in work-related days lost over the life of the PSA. The following table shows the official published statistics for each year from 1999 to 2000 to 2006-07 against the PSA target for comparison purposes.

HSE has only had formal targets relating to major hazard for the current PSA period (2005-06 to 2007-08). The table shows the major hazards targets for 2007-08 and progress towards them.

All HSE's targets cover Great Britain as a whole; although regional statistics are published, the targets, and progress towards them, are not broken down regionally or locally.


21 Feb 2008 : Column 1019W

21 Feb 2008 : Column 1020W
Improving health and safety outcomes in Great Britain through control of risks in the workplace
PSA
1999-2000 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 Q3 2008-08( 3) 2007-08 (target)

Occupational health and safety

Fatal and major injuries (per 100,000 workers)

117.3

111.1

111.7

111.8

121.1

(4)118.6

111.1

(5)107.7

(6)

115.0

Incidence of work-related ill health (per 100,000 workers)(1)

2,187

1,959

(4)1,846

1,642

2,094

(6)

1,735

Days lost due to work-related illness and injury (per worker)(1)

1.76 (2000-02)

1.68

(4)1.53

1.31

1.55

(6)

1.39

Major hazards

Number events reported by licence holders, which HSE’s Nuclear Installations Inspectorate judges as having the potential to challenge a nuclear safety system

192

(4)143

126

110

127

118

126

74

132

Number major and significant hydrocarbon releases in the offshore oil and gas sector

139

125

(4)113

85

97

83

73

73

(5)57

62

Number reportable dangerous occurrences in the onshore sector/RIDDOR(2)

177

137

(4)179

155

154

130

124

105

(5)75

152

(1) Statistics are subject to a 95 per cent. confidence interval.
(2) Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995.
(3) New major hazards data (post-APR07). Latest available for APR was Q2.
(4) Baseline years.
(5) provisional outturn.
(6) Next statistics due November 2008.

Jobseeker’s Allowance: Peterborough

Mr. Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many jobseeker's allowance claimants in Peterborough constituency had been claiming for (a) more than three months, (b) more than six months, (c) more than nine months and (d) more than 12 months, including any period for which a person may have been on the New Deal but returned to jobseeker's allowance immediately afterwards, at the most recent date for which figures are available. [174410]

Mr. Plaskitt: The additional information on spells on the New Deal is not available except at disproportionate costs. Following is a table showing information on continuous spells of claimant unemployment. We are collecting information on repeat spells on benefit which we will place in the Library in the new year.

Jobseeker’s allowance claimants by continuous duration of claim, Peterborough: November 2007
Duration of claim Number of claimants

0 to less than 3 months

870

3 to less than 6 months

360

6 to less than 9 months

180

9 to less than 12 months

150

12 months and over

270

Notes:
1. Figures are rounded to the nearest five.
2. Figures are based on computer held cases only.
Source:
NOMIS

Now Let’s Talk Money

Danny Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much his Department has spent on the “Now let's talk money” programme. [184847]

Mrs. McGuire: HM Treasury allocated £5.4 million to the Department for Work and Pensions to deliver the “Now let's talk money” campaign.

During 2006-07 and 2007-08 £4.9 million will have been spent on a range of activities to increase awareness among excluded consumers of the availability of suitable financial services; awareness raised via intermediary organisations and direct marketing. This includes £0.5 million through a special projects fund, with a balance of £0.5 million spent on the same during 2008-09.

Nuclear Power Stations: Safety

Paul Rowen: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the future demand for Health and Safety Executive inspectors of nuclear facilities; and if he will make a statement. [186681]


21 Feb 2008 : Column 1021W

Mrs. McGuire: The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) estimates in current circumstances that around 230 full-time equivalent nuclear safety inspectors will be required at the peak of its programme of nuclear regulatory work. That estimate takes account of expanding work for HSE on assessing three designs for new reactors, an understanding of programmes for Ministry of Defence nuclear facilities, and Government plans for nuclear decommissioning. The figure excludes inspectors of other disciplines employed by HSE who are also involved in regulating nuclear facilities in other areas.

Paul Rowen: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many inspectors of nuclear facilities were employed by the Health and Safety Executive in each year since 2004, broken down by region. [186682]

Mrs. McGuire: The Health and Safety Executive has employed the following number of nuclear safety inspectors within its Nuclear Directorate (ND) since 2004:


21 Feb 2008 : Column 1022W
Number

2004-05

162

2005-06

161

2006-07

157

2007-08 (as at 14 February 2008)

155


Except for two inspectors based in HSE’s London Office all nuclear safety inspectors operate from HSE’s headquarters in Bootle, Merseyside and are not located in regions.

Pensioners: Income

Mr. Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the annual income was of the average pensioner household in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) the UK in each year since 1997. [186962]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: Information cannot be provided at a lower level than Government office region, averaged over three years. Information that is available is set out in the following table.

Average net annual income before housing costs for all pensioner units, in real terms
£ per week, 2005-06 prices
North East Great Britain United Kingdom

1997-98 to 1999-2000

10,600

12,300

n/a

1998-99 to 2000-01

10,800

12,800

n/a

1999-2000 to 2001-02

11,300

13,300

n/a

2000-01 to 2002-03

12,100

13,800

n/a

2001-02 to 2003-04

12,600

14,200

n/a

2002-03 to 2004-05

13,100

14,500

n/a

2003-04 to 2005-06

13,200

14,900

14,900

Notes:
1. Net income before housing costs is gross income less income tax payments, national insurance contributions, contributions to occupational and private pension schemes, local taxes, maintenance and child support payments, and parental contributions to children living away from home. Gross income is from all sources received by the pensioner unit, including income from social security benefits, earnings from employment, any private pension, and tax credits.
2. Based on survey data and as such subject to a degree of sampling and non sampling error.
3. Figures are based on the average of three years' data for government office regions as single year estimates do not provide a robust guide to year-on-year changes. Great Britain and United Kingdom figures (where available) are included on the same basis for comparison: further information for single years at a national level are available in the publication “Pensioners’ Income Series 2005-06 (Revised)”.
4. Figures have been rounded to the nearest 100.
5. Pensioner units are either pensioner couples or single pensioners.
6. Pensioner couples are couples where one or more of the adults are state pension age or over.
Source:
Pensioners’ Income Series 2005-06 (Revised)

Next Section Index Home Page