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Sports: Schools

Ms Dari Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many school sports co-ordinators were introduced in (a) Stockton South constituency, (b) Teesside, (c) the North East and (d) England in each year since their inception. [188966]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The School Sport Partnership (SSP) infrastructure of Partnership Development Managers, School Sport Coordinators and Primary Link Teachers was rolled out in stages between 2000 and 2006.

Information on the numbers of School Sport Co-ordinators is only held on a live basis. The following table details information that is readily available.


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2005 2006 2008

(a) Stockton, South

5

5

9

(b) Teesside

35

38

38

(c) North East

132

211

209

(d) England

1,790

2,765

3,255


Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport pursuant to the Answer of 29 October 2007, Official Report, column 639W, on sports: schools, how many of the competition managers will be senior competition managers. [189354]

Mr. Sutcliffe: When completed, our national network of at least 225 competition managers will include 49 senior competition managers leading teams of competition managers across 49 county areas.

Sports: Young People

Mr. Don Foster: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (1) what percentage of (a) boys and (b) girls under the age of 16 met the physical activity recommendations of 60 minutes or more of activity of at least moderate intensity on all days of the week in each year for which figures are available; [189024]

(2) what percentage of (a) boys and (b) girls under the age of 16 undertook less than 30 minutes of physical activity per day in each year for which figures are available. [189025]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The information requested is not collected centrally. The National School Sport Survey measures the percentage of children aged five to 16 doing at least two hours of high quality PE and school sport each week. The 2006-07 survey shows that this currently stands at 86 per cent. Copies of the survey results have been placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Swimming Pools

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many swimming pools (a) there are and (b) are planned in the (i) Southend, (ii) Essex, (iii) Hertfordshire and (iv) London. [188997]

Mr. Sutcliffe: According to the Active Places database the number of swimming pools in the regions requested is as follows:

Number

Essex (including the unitaries of Southend and Thurrock)

178

Southend

14

London

567

Hertfordshire

140


The number of swimming pools planned is as follows:

Number

Essex (including the unitaries of Southend and Thurrock)

4

Southend

1

London

6

Hertfordshire

4


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Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many swimming pools (a) closed and (b) opened in England in each year since 1997; and how many diving pools are open to the public. [188998]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Information on pool openings and closures across England was not collected centrally prior to 2004, when the Active Places database of sports facilities across England was established. The most recent information from Sport England indicates the number of pools (not sites) opened and closed in each year since 2004 is:

Opened Closed

2004

117

13

2005

93

60

2006

87

58

2007

57

33

Total

354

282


There are 64 diving pools open to the public with one temporary closure at Crystal Palace.

Leader of the House

Ministers: Allowances

Mr. Jeremy Browne: To ask the Leader of the House what the cost to the public purse of ministerial allowances was in each year for which figures are available, broken down by department. [187578]

Mr. Watson: I have been asked to reply.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 31 January 2008, Official Report, column 503W.

Duchy of Lancaster

Members: Correspondence

Mr. Arbuthnot: To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster when he will reply to the letters of 16 July and 22 October 2007 from the hon. Member for North East Hampshire, requesting an internal review and revised decision under the Freedom of Information Act 2005. [184777]

Edward Miliband: I have received the hon. Member’s letter of 6 February requesting that his letters of 16 July and 24 October 2007 be treated as a request for information under the Freedom of Information Act 2000. A response will be sent shortly.

Regulatory Impact Assessments

Mike Penning: To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what advice or guidance his Department provides to other departments on (a) the stage in the legislative process at which impact assessments should be carried out and (b) the purpose of impact assessments. [187837]

Mr. McFadden: I have been asked to reply.


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In May 2007 Government introduced the revised impact assessment process to improve clarity and transparency of new regulations, including new requirements to summarise both the rationale for government intervention and evidence supporting the final proposal.

The revised guidance supporting this process is clear that impact assessments should be developed from the earliest stages of policy making in order to assess the costs, benefits and impact of regulatory proposals. This guidance is available at:

Trade Unions

Mr. Tyrie: To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what guidelines he has issued for trade union representatives in the Civil Service on their use of (a) paid and (b) unpaid time off work on trades union duties, with particular reference to (i) political campaigning and (ii) party political activity. [186694]

Mr. Watson [holding answer 18 February 2008]: No central guidelines have been issued. These matters are delegated to individual Departments to determine with their trade unions.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Agriculture: Subsidies

Steve Webb: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Copeland of 10 January 2008, if he will publish single farm payments (a) made to individual farmers, (b) broken down by size of farm and (c) broken down by size of payment. [187835]

Jonathan Shaw: Once all single payment scheme payments have been completed a decision will be taken on the level of detail that will be published.

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many farmers have not yet received (a) a 2005 and (b) a 2006 single farm payment. [187974]

Jonathan Shaw: There are currently nine outstanding cases for SPS 2005.

For SPS 2006 there are currently 69 claims where processing is not yet complete.

Agriculture: Waste Disposal

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs why farmers are not permitted to bury fallen stock; and what regard has been given to the environmental effects of such a ban. [187975]

Jonathan Shaw: The ban on burying fallen stock on-farm was introduced by the EU Animal By-Products Regulation 1774/2002. The Regulation aims to protect public and animal health from any potential risks associated with the burial of fallen
27 Feb 2008 : Column 1620W
stock. It was introduced on a precautionary basis, influenced by evidence provided in a number of scientific opinions from the EU's scientific steering committee.

The environmental effects of such a ban have not been assessed. However, the voluntary National Fallen Stock scheme, run by the National Fallen Stock Company (NFSCo), operates in a way that encourages as many local operators as possible to collect fallen stock and limits the “carcase miles” travelled.

The EU Animal By-Products Regulation that imposed the burial ban also provides for the approval of new disposal methods once their effectiveness has been assessed by the European Food Safety Authority. One potential method undergoing research, and in which the NFSCo has taken an interest, is the use of bioreducers. Subject to this research eventually being submitted for, and passing, such an assessment, these may provide a route for on-farm disposal of some fallen stock in the future.

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will reduce restrictions on farmers burying fallen stock. [187976]

Jonathan Shaw: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 7 February 2008, Official Report, column 1342W.

Animals: Quarantine

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs where animals other than cats and dogs are kept in quarantine in the UK; and under what conditions. [188283]

Jonathan Shaw: Animals can be kept in quarantine at zoos, research centres, and temporary holding facilities at ports or airports. On rare occasions, additional premises such as film sets have been approved using zoo specifications. All such quarantine facilities are inspected and approved by Animal Health and supervised by a veterinary superintendent.

Conditions are laid down for disease security, but the rabies order contains no provision for welfare rules in quarantine facilities. However, the normal welfare legislation conditions for zoos, research centres, etc. still apply.

Bill Wiggin: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) how his Department monitors the Voluntary Code in relation to the welfare of animals in quarantine premises; and if he will make a statement; [188527]

(2) whether there have been any breaches of the Voluntary Code in relation to the welfare of animals in quarantine premises since 1997; and if he will make a statement. [188528]

Jonathan Shaw: Animal Health monitors compliance with the Voluntary Code, but does not ‘enforce’ it. As the code is voluntary, Animal Health can only insist that transgressing quarantine kennels withdraw from the scheme and remove the compliance statement from their literature.

As Animal Health is not an enforcement or regulating body, no information on breaches of the Voluntary Code is being held.


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Avian Influenza

Mr. Peter Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what advice his Department has received from (a) independent and (b) international experts on H5N1 virus surveillance strategy; and if he will make a statement. [188724]

Jonathan Shaw [holding answer 25 February 2008]: The Veterinary Laboratory Agency (VLA), in its role as a World and EU Community Reference Laboratory for avian influenza, collaborates at an international level with many leading institutes so that information and expert advice can be shared. In particular, the VLA chairs and leads a working group, which conducts detailed scientific analysis of wild bird surveillance (AIWBS) data on avian influenza from all EU member states; this helps to continually advise and develop the European AIWBS strategy. In addition, the VLA provides direct advice, through its expert consultants, to DEFRA, EU member states, and the European Commission.

The VLA also participates in global projects to improve and continuously develop surveillance strategies with a particular focus on HPAI H5N1. This is achieved via a number of formal partnerships funded through EU projects, and also by close interactions with international organisations such as the World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) and the Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO).

DEFRA obtains expert advice on the ecology and biology of waterfowl and other wild birds from the Ornithological Expert Panel, which comprises representatives from the major international non-governmental organisations working in this field, along with Natural England and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee.

My Department also exchanges information with the Health Protection Agency and the Department of Health.


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