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27 Feb 2008 : Column 1725W—continued


Prisons: Finance

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how much and what proportion of the
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funding announced for building new prisons is expected to be spent on (a) purchasing land, (b) architectural costs, (c) prison accommodation construction costs and (d) legal costs; and if he will make a statement; [188157]

(2) how much and what proportion of the funding allocated to building new prisons is expected to be spent on prison (a) healthcare facilities, (b) exercise and recreational facilities, (c) educational facilities, (d) detoxification facilities and (e) workshops; and if he will make a statement. [188158]

Mr. Straw: The prison capacity programme has £2.2 billion allocated to deliver around 11,700 places. Further to this, up to £120 million has been provisionally allocated for the land purchase including three Titans in the post—2011 SR period and this will be subject to the usual SR process.

This programme will provide around 2,300 places in three new prisons and a further 7,500 places to be provided in three Titan prisons. The remaining places in the programme are provided in expansions to existing prison sites and conversions of some surplus MOD and NHS sites.

Although land is still to be purchased for the Titans, no additional expenditure on land purchase has been required for the other three prisons as the land is already in NOMS ownership.

It is estimated that the proportion of costs across the whole capacity programme will be 3 per cent. for architectural or design fees, 90 per cent. for construction fees and less than 1 per cent. for legal fees.

Where new prisons are to be procured through the Design, Construct Manage Finance (DCMF) process, the bids are evaluated on the cost per prisoner place over the lifetime of the proposed contract. A breakdown of the regime elements at the new prisons such as health care, exercise, education and detoxification facilities cannot be provided at this stage of the current ongoing DCMF competition.

Repossession Orders: Greater London

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many home repossessions there have been in each London borough in each year since 2000; [188974]

(2) how many home repossessions there have been in each London court in each year since 2000. [188975]

Bridget Prentice: The following table shows the number of mortgage possession orders made in all London county courts since 2000.

These figures do not indicate how many houses have been repossessed through the courts, since not all the orders will have resulted in the issue and execution of warrants of possession.

The civil procedure rules state that all claims for the repossession of land must be commenced in the district in which the land is situated. However, county courts jurisdictions are not coterminous with London borough boundaries, and therefore any single court’s repossession actions are likely to relate to homes in a number of different boroughs.


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Number of mortgage possession orders made( 1, 2, 3) in county courts( 4) in London, 2000-07
Court 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Barnet

156

151

193

203

288

556

580

524

Bow

494

461

495

630

900

1,427

1,706

1,863

Brentford

206

264

258

279

373

604

780

656

Bromley

371

327

406

555

599

1,047

1,130

1,061

Central London

89

84,

130

184

268

518

413

301

Croydon

619

674

630

758

928

1,483

1,867

1,703

Edmonton

467

446

525

532

650

1,122

1,251

1,183

Ilford

257

236

236

245

404

573

652

Kingston-upon-Thames

151

140

154

213

214

358

425

312

Lambeth

184

267

304

367

558

924

1,096

1,077

Romford

365

317

319

421

496

920

992

1,024

Uxbridge

246

265

254

265

356

521

603

553

Wandsworth

163

186

203

248

342

557

586

485

West London

84

96

95

135

147

290

296

226

Willesden

323

390

323

445

502

900

1,093

845

Woolwich

162

132

215

214

349

642

911

Clerkenwell and Shoreditch

143

160

201

300

411

666

814

661

Mayors and City

1

1

2

0

3

2

9

10

Ilford and Woolwich(5)

1,458

London total

4,481

4,597

4,943

5,994

7,788

13,110

15,204

13,942

(1) Local authority and private.
(2) The court, following a judicial hearing, may grant an order for possession immediately. This entitles the claimant to apply for a warrant to have the defendant evicted. However, even where a warrant for possession is issued, the parties can still negotiate a compromise to prevent eviction.
(3) Includes suspended orders and orders made.
(4) Does not include the small number of possession actions entered in the High Court.
(5) The figures for Ilford and Woolwich county courts, which are without access to the possession claim on-line (PCOL) system, are aggregated for 2007. This is due to county courts with access to possession claim on-line (PCOL) drawing mortgage and landlord possession orders on behalf of other county courts which has resulted in data being excluded from the Department's Management Information System (MIS), from which the figures in this table are sourced. An aggregate upward adjustment has therefore been applied to the numbers of orders made at these two county courts.

Wills: Royal Family

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what representations he has received from lawyers acting for the royal family on publication practice on royal wills in the last 10 years. [188632]

Mr. Straw: Neither my predecessors, nor I have received any representations from lawyers acting for the royal family on publication practice on royal wills in the last 10 years. An application to seal a royal will is made to the Principal Registry of the Family Division and is decided by the President. In the last 10 years there have been two such applications; namely those in respect of Her Royal Highness Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon and Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.

Young Offenders

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many and what proportion of young people appearing before restorative peer panels in (a) Preston and (b) England subsequently broke contractual obligations agreed with the panel in the latest period for which figures are available; [189719]

(2) what the ages have been of the young people who have appeared before restorative peer panels in (a) Preston and (b) England since the hearings started; [189720]

(3) how many cases have been (a) heard and (b) resolved by restorative peer panels in (i) Preston and (ii) England since the hearings started; [189721]

(4) for which offences restorative peer panels may be used; [189722]

(5) which contract options have been taken up by young people appearing before restorative peer panels in (a) Preston and (b) England since their inception. [189723]

Mr. Hanson: The peer panel project in Preston is still in its very early stages and there have been relatively few young people referred to it to date. The expectation however is that numbers will increase as the project develops. The Invest to Save Bid monies have been allocated to the project in Preston alone. In answer to the individual questions:


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