Previous Section Index Home Page

5 Mar 2008 : Column 2666W—continued


Criminal Records Bureau pay range October 2007 to August 2008
Salary
Grade Minimum (£) Maximum (£)

AA

12,883

15,002

AO

14,551

18,377

EO

19,333

24,416

SPS

19,730

24,416

HEO

24,170

31,468

SEO

31,150

38,160

SEO ACC

34,478

43,101

G7

41,387

56,688

G6

50,700

70,153


Departmental Retirement

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many staff in her Department retired on grounds of stress-related illness in each of the last three years. [187503]


5 Mar 2008 : Column 2667W

Mr. Byrne: The Home Office is unable to provide information on how many staff have retired on grounds of stress-related illness. Our database records any retirement that is as a result of sickness as a ‘medical retirement’. The Home Office is committed to reducing work related stress and ensuring, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of all employees. The Home Office policy is concerned with managing the risk factors of stress in the workplace for the reduction or elimination (so far as is reasonably practicable) of the causes of work-related stress, together with the provision of support for staff who may experience stress from any cause.

Deportation

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what account her Department takes of Foreign and Commonwealth Office travel advice in decisions on deportation. [191405]

Mr. Byrne [holding answer 3 March 2008]:( )Foreign and Commonwealth Office travel advice is for British nationals.( )There is often a difference between the risks a British citizen would face( )when travelling to a foreign country and those for someone returning to( )what is their home country. Travel advice aimed at British travellers( )cannot therefore be assumed to apply in the same way to nationals of( )the country concerned. Instead, decisions about whether it would be safe( )to return an individual to their country of origin are taken in the light of all( )the available information about conditions as they relate to nationals of that country.

Deportation: Cameroon

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what account she has taken of recent events in Cameroon in plans to review her policy on deportations to that country; and what recent discussions she has had with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on this matter. [191560]

Mr. Byrne [holding answer 4 March 2008]: Officials from the Border and Immigration Agency continue to closely monitor the situation in Cameroon and are in regular contact with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in order to obtain accurate and up-to-date information on recent events there. Asylum and human rights applications made from Cameroonian nationals continue to be considered on their individual merits in accordance with our international obligations and taking full account of the latest available information about the conditions in Cameroon as they impact on the individual applicant. The Border and Immigration Agency only enforces the removal of Cameroonian nationals who we are satisfied are not in need of protection.

Dogs

Mr. Prisk: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department is taking to deal with attacks by dogs on (a) adults and (b) children. [191009]

Mr. Coaker: The Government take all violent crime extremely seriously. A person who uses a dog to attack
5 Mar 2008 : Column 2668W
another person, provided they have the requisite intent, could be committing one of a range of offences of violence against the person such as grievous bodily harm. Any such offence will be investigated and prosecuted in the same way as any other violent crime.

The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 (as amended in 1997) makes it an offence to breed, or breed from, four types of dog identified as bred specifically for fighting: the pit bull terrier; the Japanese Tosa; the Dogo Argentino; and the Fila Braziliero. It is also an offence to sell or exchange, or advertise or offer for sale or exchange, any of these dogs.

The legislation also provides protection to the public from a dog of any type or breed which is dangerously out of control in a public place, or in a private place where it has no right to be.

Following the tragic dog attacks on children last year and earlier this year, we are currently undertaking a review of the dangerous dogs legislation.

Drugs: Misuse

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many illegal (a) cannabis and (b) methamphetamine factories were detected in each of the last three years, broken down by police force area. [191379]

Mr. Coaker: The information requested is not collected centrally by the Home Office.

Emergency Calls

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what the cost was of each of the four pilot schemes piloting the non-emergency 101 number; what assessment has been made of the pilot schemes; and if she will place a copy of the final report in the Library; [188366]

(2) what the cost was of each of the four pilot schemes for the non-emergency 101 number; what assessment has been made of the pilot schemes; and if she place a copy of the final report on the schemes in the Library. [188869]

Mr. McNulty: I refer the hon. Member to the answers given on 7 January 2008, Official Report, column 254W and on 19 February 2008, Official Report, column 580W.

Entry Clearances

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 28 January 2008, Official Report, column 98W, on entry clearances, what estimate her Department has made of the number of foreign nationals resident in the UK who the Government are permitted to require to possess a biometric information document under the UK Borders Act 2007; what estimate her Department has made of the percentage such individuals constitute of the total number of foreign nationals resident in the United Kingdom; and what estimate her Department has made of the number of biometric information documents the Government plans to issue to such nationals by (a) January 2009, (b) January 2010 and (c) January 2011; and if she will make a statement. [184425]


5 Mar 2008 : Column 2669W

Mr. Byrne: The roll out strategy for biometric immigration documents will be published shortly.

Foreign Workers: Iraq

Mr. Lidington: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the Government plan to provide accommodation in the UK to Iraqi citizens formerly employed by the Ministry of Defence and their families who are granted indefinite leave to enter. [190411]

Mr. Byrne: ( )The Border and Immigration Agency is currently in the process of putting( )in place a reception, orientation and integration package for Iraqi citizens( )who enter the UK as part of the direct entry scheme. This package will( )include the provision of accommodation.

Frontiers: Personal Records

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost has been of Project Semaphore since its inception; and if she will make a statement. [176720]

Mr. Byrne [holding answer 7 January 2008]: Project Semaphore was launched in November 2004 and was commissioned to run for 39 months to provide an operational prototype to trial e-Borders concepts and technology in order to inform and de-risk the e-Borders solution.

Up to November 2007 the cost of Project Semaphore was £38 million.

To date, there have been over 19,000 alerts issued resulting in more than 1500 arrests for crimes which include murder, kidnap, rape, assault, firearms and fraud. These include:

Genetics: Databases

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many and what proportion of new DNA profiles added to the National DNA database in each month since September 2007 relate to individuals aged (a) under 16, (b) 16 to 18, (c) 19 to 20, (d) 21 to 30, (e) 31 to 40, (f) 41 to 50, (g) 51 to 60 and (h) over 60 years, broken down by police force; and if she will make a statement. [179093]

Meg Hillier: The figures given in the tables are the number of subject sample profiles taken by police forces in England and Wales and loaded to the National DNA Database (NDNAD) between 1 October 2007 and 18 January 2008. The data was obtained on 18 January 2008 and is based on the current age of the subjects as at 18 January 2008. Copies have been placed in the Library.

A proportion of DNA profiles held on the NDNAD are replicates, that is, a profile for a person has been loaded on more then one occasion (one reason for this is that the person gave different names, or different versions of their name, on separate arrests). During
5 Mar 2008 : Column 2670W
2007, the replication rate was calculated to be 13.7 per cent. It was re-calculated as at 31 December 2007 and it is now estimated that 13.3 per cent. of profiles held on the NDNAD are replicates. Therefore, the number of individuals on the NDNAD is now approximately 13.3 per cent. less than the number of subject profiles. The presence of these replicate profiles on the NDNAD does not impact on the effectiveness and integrity of the database. None the less, a long-term exercise is under way to identify issues associated with the removal of all such redundant replicate profiles.

Homicide

Mr. Carswell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many honour killings were recorded by each police force in each of the last 10 years; and if she will make a statement. [185349]

Mr. Coaker: The requested information cannot be provided as, currently, circumstances around so-called honour killings are not identifiable from centrally-held homicide data. However, over the coming months we will be working closely with the Association of Chief Police Officers to develop an honour-based violence action plan that will seek to ensure that all reports of honour-based violence are investigated and to increase awareness of this appalling crime. We will be reporting on the progress of this work on a regular basis.

More broadly, we are currently developing a national black and minority ethnic (BME) working group of Government, statutory agencies and the third sector that will promote a partnership approach to issues such as domestic and sexual violence, forced marriage, so-called honour crimes and female genital mutilation. The group will identify and develop actions and practical tools to assist victims and potential victims.

We are also aware that we need to understand more about the help-seeking behaviours of women from BME communities with a view to informing national policy and practice development. We have commissioned research from Bristol university to undertake a study of this and expect interim findings in September 2008.

Illegal Immigrants: Crime

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people residing in the UK illegally were convicted of a criminal offence in each year since 2002. [183035]

Jacqui Smith: In order to provide the information requested the detailed examination of individual case files would be required and for this to be cross referenced with information held on the Police National Computer.

The chief executive of the Border and Immigration Agency has regularly written to the Home Affairs Committee and provided the most robust and accurate information available on foreign national prisoners. Copies of these letters are available in the Library of the House.


5 Mar 2008 : Column 2671W

Immigrants: Police Custody

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on how many occasions the Immigration Service used police cells to hold immigrants in each year since 1997; and what the average cost was in each police force area in each year. [190827]

Mr. Byrne: The information requested could only be obtained by the detailed examination of individual case records and could therefore be provided only at a disproportionate cost.

Offenders: Deportation

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the Government seeks to deport (a) foreign national offenders sentenced to imprisonment for a period of less than one year and (b) foreign national offenders sentenced to non-custodial community punishments. [180681]

Mr. Byrne: The chief executive of the Border and Immigration Agency advised in her appearance before the Home Affairs committee on 15 January that over 4,200 foreign national prisoners were deported or removed from the United Kingdom in 2007. Our policy was set out very clearly during the passage of the UK Borders Act.

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the Government seeks to deport foreign national offenders sentenced to (a) less than a year’s custody and (b) non-custodial community punishments for (i) possession of a firearm and (ii) possession of class B or C drugs with intent to supply. [180682]

Mr. Byrne: Our policy was set out very clearly during the passage of the UK Borders Act.

Offensive Weapons: Crime

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what research has been undertaken by her Department on (a) areas and (b) communities with high levels of knife-related crime. [180309]

Mr. Coaker: The Home Office regularly collects information on knives and violent incidents via the British Crime Survey. The findings are published each year at national level. Data from the 2006-07 survey can be found on the Home Office web site at:

The Offending, Crime and Justice Survey (OCJS) also includes questions on young people carrying and using knives. These findings are also published at national level. The latest published information from the 2005 survey can be found on the Home Office website at:

Historically, homicide has been the only offence category for which police recorded knife crime is collected by the Home Office. Figures are published each year for method of killing, and 'sharp instrument' is one of these methods. National findings for 2006-07 can be found on the Home Office website at:


5 Mar 2008 : Column 2672W

Data on knife-enabled grievous bodily harm and robbery offences have been collected centrally since April 2007. Figures for 2007-08 will be published in July 2008 in the next annual ‘Crime in England and Wales’ volume.


Next Section Index Home Page