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12 Mar 2008 : Column 503W—continued

Humanitarian Aid: Gaza

12. Richard Younger-Ross: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will make a statement on the provision of humanitarian aid in Gaza. [193273]

Mr. Douglas Alexander: Aid agencies are working to address the serious humanitarian situation in Gaza. However, the priority is to reopen the crossings and ensure unrestricted humanitarian access, including the supply of medical equipment, fuel, food and electricity. I have allocated £2 million to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) which provides water, sanitation, food, medicines and shelter. This is in addition to our wider contribution to the Palestinians of £243 million over three years, linked to political progress.

Kenya

13. Ms Keeble: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment he has made of the assistance needed by Kenya to deal with the aftermath of the post-election violence. [193274]

Gillian Merron: A consolidated assessment of assistance needed is being co-ordinated through the Donor Co-ordination Group, drawing on sector assessments from private sector groups and Government Ministries.

Key priorities already identified include humanitarian assistance for the internally displaced, enhancing food security by ensuring access to farm inputs to get fields planted for the long rains in April, and financial resources for the micro and small enterprise sector.

Malaria

15. Mrs. James: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what progress is being made in reducing the prevalence of malaria in developing countries. [193276]

Gillian Merron: The UK is part of the international effort committed to reducing the impact of malaria.

The increasing availability of improved medicines (artemisinin-based) worldwide and the increasing provision of insecticide-treated mosquito nets is helping to combat malaria. The combination of
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increased bednet use, indoor residual spraying and better access to drugs for treatment is helping to reduce the high levels of mortality—especially among children—in several countries.

Departmental Cost-Effectiveness

Bob Spink: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what progress his Department has made in its zero-based budget review under the Comprehensive Spending Review. [191485]

Mr. Malik: I refer the hon. Member to the Annex pertaining to my Department in ‘Meeting the aspirations of the British people: the 2007 Pre-Budget Report and Comprehensive Spending Review’ (Cm 7227).

Departmental Official Cars

Mr. Kemp: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what make and model of car (a) he and (b) each Minister in his Department selected as their official ministerial car; and what criteria were applied when making the decision in each case. [192382]

Mr. Douglas Alexander: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given by the Under-Secretary of State for Transport, my hon. Friend the Member for Poplar and Canning Town (Jim Fitzpatrick) on 10 March 2008, Official Report, column 8W.

Departmental Plants

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much his Department spent on pot plants in each of the last five years. [192061]

Mr. Malik: The Department for International Development (DFID) has spent the following sums on plants, live and artificial, between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2007:

£

    2003

    15,526.00

    2004

    49,590.00

    2005

    28,084.00

    2006

    25,353.00

    2007

    22,675.00


DFID has a variety of live and artificial trees and plants in the London and East Kilbride offices. It is not possible to identify the cost of pot plants only so the above figures in the table cover all the expenses associated with plants, including their procurement and maintenance.

Developing Countries

Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps are being taken by his Department on development awareness and community engagement; and if he will make a statement. [193014]


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Gillian Merron: Raising awareness of global poverty and enabling UK communities to get involved in development is a priority for the Department for International Development (DFID). There are an increasing number of relevant initiatives under way including,

NDPBs: Animal Welfare

Mr. Morley: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which of his Department’s advisory non-departmental public bodies have an animal welfare specialist on them. [193108]

Mr. Malik: DFID has one non-departmental public body, the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission, which currently has no animal welfare specialist among its Commissioners.

Nepal: Politics and Government

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment his Department has made of the humanitarian situation in Nepal following the 2006 peace accord; and if he will make a statement. [192648]

Mr. Malik: The Department for International Development (DFID), like other international donors, monitors the humanitarian situation in Nepal primarily through the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). OCHA provides leadership to and co-ordination of the international humanitarian community, and works with DFID and other international bodies to monitor and respond to emerging and ongoing humanitarian crises.

In this role, OCHA has conducted continuous assessments of the humanitarian situation in Nepal following the 2006 peace accord. Details of the most recent national assessment can be found in the UN Common Appeal for Nepal 2008:

This appeal provides a framework for a co-ordinated international response to humanitarian issues in Nepal. The appeal focuses on issues of particular importance in the short term, including food security, health, displacement, disaster preparedness, and protection. DFID is currently examining the appeal document to assess which elements it might support, and will
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continue to monitor the humanitarian situation jointly with OCHA and other partners.

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment his Department has made of the humanitarian impact of (a) the Madhesi movement for increased autonomy and (b) conflict between the Government of Nepal and the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) and other rebel forces; what assistance his Department is providing to Nepal; and if he will make a statement. [192650]

Mr. Malik: The Department for International Development (DFID), like other international donors, monitors the humanitarian situation in Nepal primarily through the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). OCHA provides leadership to and co-ordination of the international humanitarian community, and works with DFID and other international bodies to monitor and respond to emerging and ongoing humanitarian crises.

In this role, OCHA has conducted continuous assessments of the humanitarian impact of both the recent Madhesi movement for increased autonomy in the south of Nepal and of the 10 year conflict between the Government and Maoist forces. Details of these assessments can be found in the UN Common Appeal for Nepal 2008:

In the past financial year DFID has provided £53 million of support for Nepal, making it the largest bilateral donor to the country. This funding supports the implementation of the peace process (including the elections); support to improved governance, including in public financial management; provision of essential services like health and education, road building and other infrastructure, and support to improved livelihoods and greater economic opportunity for poor people.

Justice

Departmental Property

Anne Main: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many residential properties his Department owns; how many of these are vacant; and how many of these have been vacant for longer than (a) three, (b) six and (c) 12 months. [192997]

Maria Eagle: The Ministry of Justice headquarters does not own any residential properties.

Driving Under Influence: Alcoholic Drinks

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) arrests, (b) prosecutions and (c) convictions there were for drink driving in (i) Lancashire and (ii) England in each year since 2000. [193592]

Maria Eagle: The arrests collection held by my Department covers persons arrested for recorded crime (notifiable offences), by main offence group (for
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instance, violence against the person, sexual offences, robbery, burglary, theft and handling stolen goods) and police force area within England and Wales. Information on summary offences is non-notifiable and as a result not covered by the collection.

Available information held on prosecutions and findings of guilt for offences of driving under the
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influence of alcohol or drugs for the years 2000 to 2005 (latest available) is provided in the following tables. 2006 data will be available later this year.

The data provided cover drink and drugs offences combined, as volumes of prosecutions and convictions for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs cannot be accurately established:

Prosecutions at magistrate courts and findings of guilt at all courts for offences of driving etc after consuming alcohol or taking drugs( 1) , within Lancashire police force area, and England, 2000-05
Number of offences
2000 2001 2002
Proceedings Findings of guilt Proceedings Findings of guilt Proceedings Findings of guilt

Lancashire police force

2,879

2,564

2,570

2,304

2,928

2,599

England

89,329

79,671

89,172

78,684

95,275

84,456


Number of offences
2003 2004 2005
Proceedings Findings of guilt Proceedings Findings of guilt Proceedings Findings of guilt

Lancashire police force

3,014

2,652

3,019

2,706

2,995

2,723

England

98,522

87,392

100,048

89,904

96,587

87,482

(1 )Data provided covers summary offences of driving etc. after consuming alcohol or taking drugs (which cannot be reliably distinguished separately).
Notes:
1. It is known that for some police force areas, the reporting of court proceedings in particular those relating to summary motoring offences, may be less than complete.
2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken lo ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Poaching

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) arrests, (b) prosecutions and (c) convictions there were for poaching in (i) Lancashire and (ii) England in each year since 2000. [193593]

Maria Eagle: The arrests collection held by my Department covers persons arrested for recorded crime (notifiable offences) only, Summary offences concerning poaching are non-notifiable and as a result are not covered by the collection.

Data showing the number of defendants proceeded against and found guilty of poaching in Lancashire and England are in the following table.

Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts for poaching in Lancashire and England, 2000 to 2006
2000 2001 2002 2003
Proceedings Findings of guilt Proceedings Findings of guilt Proceedings Findings of guilt Proceedings Findings of guilt

Lancashire police force

23

20

11

8

16

14

9

7

England

298

220

225

186

319

242

207

140


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