Previous Section Index Home Page

19 Mar 2008 : Column 1250W—continued


Crime: Detection Rates

Greg Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the feasibility of identifying separately the number of (a) crimes reported to the police and (b) crimes discovered by the police. [194582]

Mr. Coaker: The Home Office criteria for the recording of crimes by police is laid out in the Home Office counting rules for crime (HOCR) and also the national crime recording standard (NCRS). These are both public documents available at:

The HOCR are updated every year from 1 April after consultation with police forces on issues that may need clarification or when new laws are enacted or old laws repealed.

At present there are no plans to further separately identify the number of crimes reported to or discovered by the police.


19 Mar 2008 : Column 1251W

Crime: Statistics

Ben Chapman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 18 February, Official Report, column 581W, on crime: statistics, what steps she is taking to ensure that more crimes are reported to the police. [194110]

Mr. Coaker: It is a matter for individual victims of crime whether they decide to report crimes to the police.

Police forces have differing mechanisms in which victims of crime can contact them to report crimes. This can include third party referral sites, internet reporting, local community beat officer surgeries, call centres that take crimes directly over the telephone and also where the public directly ask police for assistance as the result of a crime.

Where crimes are reported they have to be recorded in accordance with the National Crime Recording Standard (NCRS) which was introduced in April 2002 which has twin aims of a victim orientated approach and also to promote greater consistency between police forces in the recording of crime.

Ben Chapman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of
19 Mar 2008 : Column 1252W
18 February 2008, Official Report, column 581W, on crime: statistics, what factors contributed to the estimate of the 2006-07 British Crime Survey that more than half of crimes are never reported to the police. [194111]

Mr. Coaker: The British Crime Survey (BCS) gives a count of crime that includes those that are not reported to the police or recorded by them. Victims who did not report the incident to the police are asked for the reasons why, and these are reported annually in the Home Office Statistical Bulletin ‘Crime in England and Wales’, copies of which can be found in the House of Common's library.

As in previous years, the latest figures from the 2006-07 BCS showed that the most common reason for not reporting incidents was that victims perceived them to be too trivial, there was no loss or they believed that the police would or could not do much about them. (71 per cent. of all comparable incidents—those crimes covered by both the BCS and police recorded crime). The second most common reason given was that the victim considered the issue to be a private matter and dealt with it themselves (17 per cent.).

A more detailed breakdown of the figures by offence category from the 2006-07 BCS can be found in the following table.

Reasons for not repo rting crime to the police, 2006- 07 BCS
Percentage
Vandalism Burglary Thefts from vehicles and attempts( 1) Other household theft Other personal theft BCS violence( 2) Comparable subset( 3) All BCS

Trivial/no loss/police would not/could not do anything(4)

83

70

84

81

66

46

71

72

Private/dealt with ourselves

10

17

10

13

13

34

17

16

Inconvenient to report

5

6

7

5

6

4

6

6

Reported to other authorities

2

2

1

2

14

8

4

5

Common occurrence

3

2

2

1

3

4

3

3

Fear of reprisal

3

4

0

2

1

7

3

3

Dislike or fear of the police/ previous bad experience with the police or courts

2

2

1

1

1

2

2

2

Other(5)

3

9

5

3

9

10

6

6

Unweighted base

2,805

362

1,323

1,414

604

933

6,234

8,252

Notes:
(1) Thefts of vehicles not shown as very few incidents were not reported.
(2) Comparable BCS violence includes wounding, robbery, assault with minor injury and assault with no injury.
(3) The comparable crime subset includes vandalism, burglary, vehicle-related theft, bicycle theft, wounding, assault with and without minor injury and robbery.
(4) Too trivial/no loss/would not have been interested/police could not do anything/attempt at offence was unsuccessful are merged due to the similarity in their definition, for example a respondent who thinks the incident was too trivial may code the incident as ‘too trivial, no loss’ or 'the police would not be interested' as these two codes may be understood as meaning the same.
(5) This category includes: something that happens as part of job; partly my/friend's/relative's fault; offender not responsible for actions; thought someone else had reported incident/similar incidents; tried to report but was not able to contact the police/police not interested; other.
So urce:
2006/07 BCS. More than one reason could be given.

Crime: Telford

David Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of trends in (a) car crime, (b) violent crime, (c) house burglary and (d) incidents of anti-social behaviour in the Telford division of West Mercia Police during the last five years. [193908]

Mr. Coaker: There have been very substantial falls in vehicle crime and domestic burglary in the Telford and Wrekin division of the West Mercia police force area. Between 2002-03 and 2006-07, recorded vehicle crime in Telford and Wrekin fell by 46 per cent. (from 2,797 offences to 1,506). Domestic burglary fell by 68 per cent. (from 1,433 offences to 462).


19 Mar 2008 : Column 1253W

Following a change made in response to suggestions in the two reviews of crime statistics, the Home Office no longer use the term violent crime in connection with the recorded crime statistics and we now concentrate on figures for violence against the person. Between 2002-03 and 2006-07, violence against the person fell by 35 per cent. (from 4,280 offences to 2,795).

Overall, vehicle crime accounted for 11 per cent. of all recorded crime in the Division in 2006-07. Violence against the person and domestic burglary accounted for 21 and 3 per cent. of all recorded crime respectively.

With regard to assessing antisocial behaviour, this is measured through a measure of perceptions using the British Crime Survey (BCS), a nationally representative survey of adults aged 16 and over living in private households in England and Wales.

The size of the sample in the BCS means that we cannot provide reliable data for geographical areas smaller than police force areas and we are therefore not able to make a reliable assessment about trends in antisocial behaviour in the Telford and the Wrekin division.

Crimes of Violence: Ashford

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many crimes of violence against the person have been recorded in Ashford in each of the last five years. [195144]

Mr. Coaker: The information requested is shown in the following table.

Violence against the person offences recorded by the police in Ashford
Number of offences

2002-03

1,156

2003-04

1,255

2004-05

1,573

2005-06

1,548

2006-07

1,499


Crimes of Violence: Crime Prevention

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how often the Ministerial Action Group to assess the implementation of the Government’s Action Plan for Tackling Violence is planned to meet; and when the first annual report on progress in implementing the plan will be published. [194284]

Mr. Coaker: Governance and performance management arrangements for the very recently published Action Plan for Tackling Violence are not yet finalised.

The Ministerial Action Group will meet regularly, though its frequency has yet to be decided. The first annual report will be published shortly after the end of the financial year 2008-09.

Domestic Violence

Mr. Vara: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were arrested for domestic violence offences in each of the last five years, broken down by police force; how many of those
19 Mar 2008 : Column 1254W
arrested were (a) released without charge and (b) cautioned; and if she will make a statement. [192677]

Mr. Coaker: The arrests collection undertaken by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) provides data on persons arrested for recorded crime (notifiable offences), by age group, gender, ethnicity, and main offence group, i.e. violence against the person, sexual offences, robbery, burglary, etc. As part of this collection there is no information on the circumstances behind the offences nor on arrest outcomes (e.g. whether the person arrested was released without charge or given a caution).

Domestic Violence: Crime Prevention

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the domestic violence enforcement campaign conducted between December 2007 and January 2008. [194282]

Mr. Coaker: The Domestic Violence Enforcement Campaign (DVEC), which ran during December 2007 and January 2008, aimed to improve the local response to domestic violence by building on lessons learned in the 2006 DVECs. A key aspect of this was to encourage partnership working to protect victims and their children through the Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conference process.

We are currently analysing data submitted by those police forces which took part in the DVEC and aim to publish our findings later in the spring.

Drugs: Smuggling

Mr. Dai Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with which countries the UK has asset seizure agreements in respect of illegal drug dealing; and what plans she has to (a) extend the scope of existing agreements and (b) conclude agreements with further countries. [194135]

Mr. Coaker: The Government currently have formal asset seizure sharing agreements with the USA, Canada, Jamaica, Netherlands, Columbia and the United Arab Emirates, although these are not specific to drug dealing. We are aiming to refresh some existing agreements. We are also willing to enter informal sharing agreements with other jurisdictions on a case by case basis. In addition, in our Asset Recovery Action Plan launched in May 2007 we undertook to agree a priority list of countries for negotiating new asset sharing agreements by March this year. A provisional list has been drawn up and discussions are in progress with the relevant jurisdictions.

Firearms

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the cost of an illegal handgun in each of the last 10 years. [194280]

Mr. Coaker: Intelligence on the price of handguns has not been centrally recorded and collated over the period requested. However, Home Office Research
19 Mar 2008 : Column 1255W
Study 298 (December 2006) reported that the cost of a handgun varied from £150 to £200, where it had previously been used in a crime, to £1,100 to £1,400 for a new 9 mm model.


Next Section Index Home Page