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20 Mar 2008 : Column 1268W—continued

International Development

CDC

Mr. Moore: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will place in the Library copies of the accounts of CDC subsidiary companies. [195026]

Mr. Douglas Alexander: CDC had 79 subsidiary companies at 31 December 2007, registered throughout its target markets. Where they are required to do so by their relevant regulatory authorities, these subsidiary companies file their accounts in those countries and with those authorities. Accounts are therefore not available from CDC, but from the regulatory authorities in the countries in question.

CDC: Tax Havens

Mr. Moore: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what reports he has received of the alleged use of tax havens by (a) CDC and its subsidiaries and (b) Actis and its subsidiaries; what assessment he has made of these reports; and if he will make a statement. [195027]

Mr. Douglas Alexander: The former Secretary of State received advice about the tax position of Globeleq, CDC’s energy subsidiary, when it was established in 2002. He was advised by the Department for International Development and CDC’s financial advisers that an onshore structure would not have attracted investors. Bermuda was chosen because its corporate law is similar to the UK’s and a Bermudan domicile may have facilitated subsequent listing of Globeleq on a US exchange. This advice was considered and accepted.

I have not received any specific reports regarding alleged use of tax havens.


20 Mar 2008 : Column 1269W

Departmental Publications

Mr. Andrew Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will place in the Library a copy of his Department’s staff handbook. [195584]

Mr. Douglas Alexander: DFID’s staff handbook has been replaced by a new web-based system available to all DFID staff on the Department’s intranet. It is not available in hard copy because of the practical difficulties of keeping the information up to date.

Middle East: Peace Negotiations

Mr. Moore: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what financial contribution his Department made to the United Nations Development Programme Trust Fund to support the work of Quartet Special Envoy, James Wolfensohn, in (a) 2004 and (b) 2005; and if he will make a statement. [195258]

Mr. Douglas Alexander: The Department for International Development (DFID) support to Quartet Special Envoy James Wolfensohn began in 2005. DFID provided £70,000 to fund an Aid Management Specialist. A further £28,000 for that position was provided in 2006. In addition, DFID seconded a member of its own staff to the team from June 2005 to early 2006.

Sudan: Overseas Aid

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps the Government has taken to assist aid organisations with the humanitarian crisis in Darfur. [195361]

Mr. Thomas: The UK is the second largest bilateral humanitarian donor to Sudan. Since April 2004 we have given over £158 million to aid agencies delivering vital assistance to those in need in Darfur.

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent progress the Government has made in assisting UNAMID in managing the financial aspects of providing aid to the people of Darfur. [195362]

Mr. Thomas: The UK Government are supporting the efforts of the UN and African Union to deploy the UNAMID peacekeeping force in full in Darfur, including through the training and equipping of African troop-contributing countries. UNAMID co-ordinates closely with the UN agencies and non-governmental humanitarian organisations in Darfur to protect civilians and enable provision of aid in the region, and recently escorted non-governmental humanitarian organisations to deliver aid following fighting in West Darfur.

The UK has provided £158 million in humanitarian support to Darfur since 2004. My right hon. Friends the Secretary of State for International Development and the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth
20 Mar 2008 : Column 1270W
Affairs, in a joint statement on 27 February, reiterated that we will continue to work closely with the UN and others in providing humanitarian assistance to Darfur.

Home Department

Alcohol Disorder Zones

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department has spent in planning and consulting on alcohol disorder zones. [187292]

Jacqui Smith: The planning and consultation work in respect of Alcohol Disorder Zones includes developing the original policy, taking forward legislation through Parliament (the provisions are now set out in the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006) and more recently developing the regulations and accompanying guidance.

This work has been undertaken by a small number of officials who have worked on this policy area, in addition to other duties. It is not possible to quantify the cost or the time that has been spent working and consulting on this policy area.

Alcoholic Drinks: Arrests

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what evaluation has been carried out of the alcohol arrest referral pilots announced in October 2007. [193577]

Jacqui Smith: No evaluation has been carried out at this stage. However interim findings about re-offending will be available by December 2008, while a final report into re-offending will be available by summer 2009.

We hope to use the information gathered from the pilots to establish good practice, including what works for different cultural groups and different genders, and to identify the benefits to local areas of prioritising existing resources in their own alcohol referral schemes.

Alcoholic Drinks: Crime

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions there were for alcohol-related offences in each of the last five years, broken down by (i) region and (ii) offence committed. [181804]

Jacqui Smith: The information requested covering offences of (a) Drunkenness, (b) Drunkenness with aggravation, (c) Offences against the licensing acts, (d) other offences against intoxicating liquor laws, (e) selected motoring offences is provided in the following table.

With the exception of these offences, it is not possible to separately identify whether prosecutions for other offences were alcohol related from the data reported to the Ministry of Justice.


20 Mar 2008 : Column 1271W

20 Mar 2008 : Column 1272W

20 Mar 2008 : Column 1273W

20 Mar 2008 : Column 1274W
Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for selected alcohol related offences, by offence class and region, England and Wales 2002-06( 1, 2, 3)
Prosecuted Guilty
Offence class and region 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

140

Drunkenness, simple( 4)

North East

115

101

107

117

137

106

88

94

103

110

North West

300

174

123

138

138

262

149

106

121

121

Yorkshire and Humberside

274

271

210

159

176

202

222

166

124

134

East Midlands

121

88

74

43

37

107

78

64

36

29

West Midlands

131

147

170

211

308

109

123

132

170

253

East of England

286

327

272

210

169

264

293

242

191

153

London

262

251

195

151

134

228

210

162

124

114

South East

603

563

480

343

306

541

486

418

306

282

South West

435

382

326

288

266

382

350

290

261

236

Wales

340

336

294

272

172

309

300

274

255

150

England and Wales

2,867

2,640

2,251

1,932

1,843

2,510

2,299

1,948

1,691

1,582

141

Drunkenness, with aggravation( 5)

North East

4,785

5,292

5,002

5,149

4,756

4,022

4,553

4,437

4,740

4,437

North West

6,564

6,420

3,799

2,036

1,991

5,249

5,174

3,130

1,741

1,664

Yorkshire and Humberside

4,040

4,508

2,266

1,625

2,305

2,240

2,670

1,625

1,264

1,743

East Midlands

1,459

1,535

1,154

570

608

1,141

1,233

960

464

511

West Midlands

1,317

1,246

1,382

1,158

1,452

1,061

1,029

1,128

980

1,242

East of England

1,784

1,620

1,319

981

814

1,539

1,434

1,138

865

731

London

2,577

2,586

1,284

1,010

1,216

2,103

2,141

1,055

847

1,005

South East

4,259

4,439

3,392

1,812

1,439

3,369

3,661

2,791

1,538

1,260

South West

2,350

2,270

1,472

913

922

2,017

1,998

1,286

760

769

Wales

1,931

1,719

1,834

1,385

905

1,647

1,505

1,635

1,178

790

England and Wales

31,066

31,635

22,904

16,639

16,408

24,388

25,398

19,185

14,377

14,152

142

Offences by licenced person, etc( 6)

North East

17

50

72

98

52

13

38

51

69

30

North West

130

237

264

251

180

90

158

182

189

111

Yorkshire and Humberside

25

23

67

49

28

18

12

49

29

17

East Midlands

17

83

43

72

71

14

52

25

34

41

West Midlands

22

72

100

130

54

14

62

84

103

48

East of England

12

28

41

43

70

9

15

20

32

56

London

27

137

182

276

184

17

89

152

223

141

South East

21

33

72

63

68

11

23

40

37

32

South West

9

26

45

99

34

6

18

21

40

16

Wales

43

53

99

96

92

28

36

59

71

74

England and Wales

323

742

985

1,177

833

220

503

683

827

566

143

Other offences against i ntoxicating l iquor l aws( 7)

North East

24

23

25

30

47

16

17

17

24

34

North West

32

46

54

44

157

23

29

43

32

125

Yorkshire and Humberside

9

11

11

10

109

5

8

10

8

46

East Midlands

15

10

18

14

72

12

5

6

8

51

West Midlands

23

30

22

14

95

12

19

14

8

71

East of England

11

8

20

12

91

8

6

15

9

65

London

53

54

32

40

159

41

38

21

29

118

South East

14

13

14

26

79

8

10

10

18

50

South West

3

9

13

23

32

2

4

8

18

20

Wales

21

21

39

27

62

11

13

19

23

44

England and Wales

205

225

248

240

903

138

149

163

177

624

Causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs( 8)

406

North East

3

2

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

North West

5

2

2

4

6

10

5

6

7

9

Yorkshire and Humberside

6

2

5

6

5

6

5

7

10

7

East Midlands

6

8

3

7

10

4

9

12

10

4

West Midlands

5

5

5

9

9

5

6

6

8

11

East of England

10

5

7

4

8

11

7

7

5

8

London

1

3

4

2

2

3

4

8

6

1

South East

9

10

10

11

11

14

9

7

11

12

South West

5

5

6

7

4

7

7

6

5

8

Wales

2

2

2

5

4

6

1

2

3

England and Wales

52

44

43

54

62

66

60

62

66

65

803

Driving etc, after consuming alcohol or taking drugs( 9)

North East

4,323

4,552

4,665

4,377

4,275

4,032

4,177

4,366

4,138

4,069

North West

11,676

12,048

12,530

12,060

12,043

10,923

11,327

11,822

11,425

11,414

Yorkshire and Humberside

7,703

8,107

8,323

8,492

7,923

7,157

7,555

7,862

8,020

7,539

East Midlands

5,329

6,523

6,949

6,631

6,677

5,005

6,138

6,621

6,216

6,330

West Midlands

8,829

9,091

9,463

9,640

9,625

8,276

8,566

8,886

9,137

9,130

East of England

8,264

8,709

9,122

8,672

9,061

7,800

8,178

8,605

8,234

8,679

London

13,418

12,945

13,258

13,080

13,087

12,066

11,613

12,040

11,925

12,181

South East

14,684

13,921

13,929

13,137

12,583

13,726

13,040

13,122

12,458

11,962

South West

7,637

8,194

8,097

7,869

7,527

7,206

7,697

7,662

7,452

7,106

Wales

5,592

5,913

5,986

5,904

5,882

5,242

5,491

5,611

5,535

5,565

England and Wales

87,455

90,003

92,322

89,862

88,683

81,433

83,782

86,597

84,540

83,975

(1) These data are provided on the principal offence basis.
(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the police forces and courts. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
(3) The found guilty column may exceed those proceeded against, as it may be the case that the proceedings in the magistrates' court took place in the proceeding year and they were found guilty at the Crown Court in the following year or for a different offence.
(4) Includes offences of being found drunk in a highway or public place, drunk in a vehicle or drunk white entering a designated sports event.
(5) Includes offences of being guilty white drunk of disorderly behaviour, drunk with a loaded firearm and refusing to leave licensed premises when requested.
(6) Offences by license holders only. Includes offences of the illegal sale of alcohol and failure to follow licensing regulations.
(7) Offences by non-license holders: Includes offences of falsely claiming to be a licensee and illegally supplying alcohol to children.
(8) Offence cannot separately identify whether drink or drugs specifically were involved.
(9) Offence covers summary offences of driving eta after consuming alcohol or taking drugs (which cannot reliably be distinguished separately).
Source:
Court proceedings database—Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Ministry of Justice.

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