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2 Apr 2008 : Column 994W—continued

Departmental Translation Services

Mr. Paul Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills pursuant to the answer of 17 March 2008, Official Report, column 854W, on departmental translation services, how much was spent on translation services into (a) Welsh and (b) other languages in 2007-08. [197552]

Mr. Lammy: The Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills was created as a result of machinery of government changes in June 2007. Information on translation expenditure to this level can be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Higher Education

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many and what
2 Apr 2008 : Column 995W
proportion of full-time undergraduates with each number of UCAS tariff points from their A-levels did not complete their degree in each of the last 10 years for which data are available. [196659]

Bill Rammell: The available information on the proportion of UK-domiciled starters to full-time first degree courses who are projected to neither obtain an
2 Apr 2008 : Column 996W
award nor transfer to another institution is shown in table 1. Comparable figures for the 2005/06 academic year will become available in June this year. Information on the actual number of students who are projected to neither obtain an award nor transfer to another institution has not been published. These figures cannot be broken down by UCAS tariff points on entry.

Table 1: Proportion of full-time first degree starters at English and UK higher education institutions, who were projected to neither gain an award nor transfer to another institution, academic year 1997/98 to 2004/05
Percentage
Academic year 1997/98 1998/99 1999/2000 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05

England

15.8

15.9

15.8

15.0

13.8

13.9

14.4

13.8

UK

15.7

15.8

15.8

15.0

14.1

14.4

14.9

14.2

Note:
Figures from the 1996/97 academic year have been excluded due to a change in methodology between 1996/97 and 1997/98. Figures for years earlier than 1996/97 are not available.
Source:
Performance Indicators in Higher Education, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

HESA also publishes non-continuation indicators, which show the proportion of entrants to full-time first degree courses not continuing in higher education after their first year, and which can be broken down by entry qualification. Table 2 contains the available information for non-continuation indicators broken down by entry qualification.

Table 2: Proportion of UK-domiciled young( 1) entrants to full-time first degree courses at UK higher education institutions not continuing in higher education after their first year, academic year 2002/03 to 2004/05
Entry qualification categories Tariff points 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05

A-levels or highers

Unknown

11.3

12.6

13.9

Up to 200

11.7

11.9

11.2

201 to 290

7.9

8.1

7.7

291 to 380

4.9

5.3

4.9

Above 380

2.6

2.8

2.6

Other qualifications

11.4

11.6

11.2

All qualifications

7.8

7.7

7.2

(1) Young refers to entrants who are under 21 years of age.
Note:
Figures for years earlier than 2002/03 are not available.
Source:
Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE).

Student retention rates in this country compare very well internationally. The UK ranks fifth in the OECD for first degree completion rates, out of 23 countries who report data in this area. A university education is now open to more students than ever before and the higher education sector has made significant achievements in maintaining, and in some areas slightly improving, retention rates for its students.

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many and what proportion of full-time undergraduates from each socio-economic group did not complete their degree in each of the last 10 years for which data are available. [196660]

Bill Rammell: The available information on the proportion of UK-domiciled starters to full-time first degree courses who are projected to neither obtain an award nor transfer to another institution is shown in Table 1. Comparable figures for the 2005-06 academic year will become available in June this year. Information on the actual number of students who are projected to neither obtain an award nor transfer to another institution has not been published.

Table 1: Proportion of full-time first degree starters at English and UK higher education institutions, who were projected to neither gain an award nor transfer to another institution
Percentage
England UK

1997-98

15.8

15.7

1998-99

15.9

15.8

1999-2000

15.8

15.8

2000-2001

15.0

15.0

2001-02

13.8

14.1

2002-03

13.9

14.4

2003-04

14.4

14.9

2004-05

13.8

14.2

Notes: Figures from the 1996-97 academic year have been excluded due to a change in methodology between 1996-7 and 1997-98. Figures for years earlier than 1996-97 are not available. Source: Performance Indicators in Higher Education, published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

2 Apr 2008 : Column 997W

HESA also publishes non-continuation indicators, which show the proportion of entrants to full-time first degree courses not continuing in higher education after their first year. It is possible to break these down by NS-SEC. Table 2 contains the available information for
2 Apr 2008 : Column 998W
non-continuation indicators broken down by socio-economic group. Information on the actual numbers from each socio-economic group has not been published.

Table 2: Proportion of UK-domiciled young( 1) entrants to full-time first degree courses at UK higher education institutions not continuing in higher education after their first year
NS-SEC Classification 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05

Groups 1-3

6.3

6.0

5.6

Groups 4-7

8.1

8.2

7.6

Unknown

10.6

12.5

11.8

All classifications

7.8

7.7

7.2

(1) Young refers to entrants who are under 21 years of age. Note: Figures for years earlier than the 2002-03 academic year are not available: this is the earliest academic year for which socio-economic classification information is available for higher education students. Source: Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE).

Student retention rates in this country compare very well internationally. The UK rank fifth in the OECD for first degree completion rates, out of 23 countries who report data in this area. A university education is now open to more students than ever before and the Government are totally committed to providing opportunities for all people to achieve their potential and to maximise their talent.

Higher Education: Admissions

Mr. Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many people in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) England were attending universities in each year since 1997. [195228]

Bill Rammell: The latest available information is given in the table. Comparable figures for the 2007/08 academic year will be available in January 2009.

Enrolments( 1) at UK higher education institutions from Jarrow parliamentary constituency, South Tyneside local authority, north east Government office region( 2) and England: academic years 1997/98 to 2006/07
Academic year Jarrow South Tyneside North east England

1997/98

1,765

3,055

(2)67,795

1,272,780

1998/99

1,805

3,125

(2)70,715

1,308,300

1999/2000

1,790

3,090

60,890

1,309,505

2000/01

1,715

2,930

62,940

1,339,120

2001/02

1,775

3,000

64,705

1,377,475

2002/03

1,875

3,250

68,120

1,435,655

2003/04

1,985

3,420

69,980

1,492,580

2004/05

2,160

3,765

70,590

1,524,120

2005/06

2,095

3,625

71,240

1,533,770

2006/07

2,040

3,595

72,465

1,494,595

(1) Covers all students on any year of a course. Includes students on both full-time or part-time courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level including the Open university.
(2 )Figures for the 1997/98 and 1998/99 academic years relate to the North of England, rather than the north east due to a change in the classification of government office regions. Therefore, figures for this region from these two years cannot be directly compared to other years in the time series.
Note:
Figures are on a snapshot basis as at 1 December excluding those writing up, on sabbatical or dormant and are rounded to the nearest five.
Source:
Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

Overall, for all students from England, the UCAS figures show that, compared to 2006, applicants to full-time undergraduate courses who had been accepted for entry in 2007, rose by 6.1 per cent. to 307,000, the highest ever. Latest figures for students applying for entry in 2008, show that applicants from England are up by 7.1 per cent. compared to 2007.

Higher Education: Finance

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what assessment has been made of the likely effect on (a) female, (b) mature and (c) disabled students of the Government's proposed reduction in spending on equal and lower qualification students; and if he will make a statement. [195300]

Bill Rammell: Our policy is a progressive redistribution of £100 million in institutional funding by 2010 away from students who already have a first HE qualification and want to study another one at an equivalent or lower level towards first time entrants which will enable millions more people of working age without a first HE qualification to participate in higher education and enjoy all the benefits it brings. Within that group, about half are female, a quarter are over 50 and a quarter have a disability and these students will all have more opportunities as a result of the ELQ policy. The majority are likely to be mature learners from non-traditional backgrounds who want to study part-time.


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