Previous Section Index Home Page

2 Apr 2008 : Column 1059W—continued

Justice

Bail: Housing

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many units and what proportion of prison officers' accommodation will be used to provide accommodation under the bail accommodation support scheme, broken down by region; and if he will make a statement. [197989]

Mr. Hanson: There are no plans to use prison officer accommodation for the Bail Accommodation and Support Service. ClearSprings Ltd. provide the Bail Accommodation and Support Service using housing sourced from private landlords and some properties they themselves purchase.

ClearSprings Management

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 11 March 2008, Official Report, columns 376-77W, on ClearSprings Management, in which towns accommodation for remand prisoners is needed; how many accommodation places for remand prisoners are needed in each town; and if he will make a statement. [197288]

Mr. Hanson: We are continually assessing need for accommodation under BASS. I have instigated informing local MPs as well as police and probation where local schemes are being considered.

ClearSprings: Wales

Mr. Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many hostels managed by ClearSprings have been opened in Wales in the last 12 months; [197801]


2 Apr 2008 : Column 1060W

(2) whether there is a duty on ClearSprings to consult (a) the local community, (b) the police, (c) the Probation Service and (d) local authorities prior to opening a bail hostel in Wales; [197802]

(3) how many bail places were provided by ClearSprings in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08; [197805]

(4) how many bailees placed in hostels in Wales run by ClearSprings have been charged with a subsequent offence. [197807]

Mr. Hanson: The bail accommodation and support service provided by ClearSprings does not provide hostels. Normal residential housing in the community, typically with three people sharing a house, is provided for defendants whom the courts have granted bail and for offenders released on home detention curfew. Nine houses have been made available in Wales in the last 12 months. ClearSprings are required to consult the local authority, the police and probation when acquiring properties for the service. There is no requirement for any other community consultation. The service commenced from 18 June 2007. In 2007-08, from that date up to 28 March, 481 people were bailed and 375 were released on Home Detention Curfew into the service across England and Wales. Reliable information on the number of people released into the service who are charged with a subsequent offence is not available.

Convictions: Disclosure of Information

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether his Department plans to bring forward proposals to reform the provisions of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 on the disclosure of previous criminal convictions for ex-offenders; and if he will make a statement. [197304]

Mr. Hanson: The Government undertook a review of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act in 2002 and published the document 'Breaking the Circle' which set out proposals for reform of the Act. That paper made proposals for modifying disclosure periods for offences, and other changes to the operation of the Act. In 2003 the Government agreed that the proposals had merit and proposed to legislate when parliamentary time allowed. I am currently reviewing the position in the light of the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006, which was based on the recommendations of the Bichard report, and which makes changes to the disclosure situation for ex-offenders in many areas of employment.

Criminal Injuries Compensation: EC Nationals

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many citizens of other EU countries have (a) made and (b) received compensation in respect of criminal injuries compensation claims in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement; [197439]

(2) the average payment was in respect of successful criminal injuries compensation claims made by citizens from other EU countries in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement. [197441]

Maria Eagle: Anyone, of any nationality or domicile, who sustains an injury in Great Britain as a result of
2 Apr 2008 : Column 1061W
violent crime, is eligible to apply for compensation under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority, which administers the scheme, does not record information about an applicant's nationality since that is not a qualifying criterion for compensation. The Authority cannot, therefore, supply the information requested.

Deportation: Offenders

Mr. Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what progress has been made in securing agreements with third countries on the return of prisoners held in the UK. [196816]

Mr. Hanson: In 2007, prisoner transfer agreements were concluded with Jamaica and with Pakistan. The agreement with Jamaica will come into force when amendments have been made to Jamaican law. The agreement with Pakistan was signed on 24 August 2007 and will enter into force as soon as we have confirmation that constitutional arrangements in Pakistan have been completed and instruments of ratification have been exchanged. We expect that the agreement will be in force soon.

In addition to the agreements signed last year, an agreement with Ghana has recently been concluded and will be signed shortly. Negotiations with Nigeria and Vietnam are at an advanced stage.

Domestic Violence: Wales

Mr. Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the delivery of domestic violence programmes in probation areas in Wales against delivery timetables in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08. [197900]

Maria Eagle: National guidance to probation areas states that offenders sentenced to a community order with a requirement to attend an accredited domestic violence programme should commence the group work programme by the 12th week of the order. In some cases this timeline can be altered at the discretion of the offender manager. There is no timetable for offenders on licence.

Offenders waiting for a place on a domestic violence programme are under the supervision of their offender manager. The offender manager will monitor the risk posed by the offender and manage it. Additionally the offender manager will normally prepare offenders for the programmes by carrying out set work. This can take between six and 12 weeks.

Driving Offences: Greater London

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people were charged with a speeding offence in each London borough in each of the last five years. [197283]

Maria Eagle: Available information on the number of proceedings at magistrates courts for speed limit offences within the Metropolitan and city of London police force areas combined from 2001 to 2005 (latest available) is provided in the following table. 2006 data will be available later this year.


2 Apr 2008 : Column 1062W

Information on the number of people charged by the police is not collected centrally.

Proceedings at magistrates courts for speed limit offences( 1) , London( 2) , 2001 to 2005
Number of offences

2001

9,968

2002

8,971

2003

9,184

2004

9,487

2005

11,589

(1) Offences under the Road Traffic Regulations Act 1984 ss. 16, 81, 84, 86, 88 and 89; Motor Vehicles (Speed Limits on Motorways) Regs 1973; Parks Regulation (Amendment) Act 1926—byelaws made thereunder.
(2) Metropolitan and city of London police combined.
Note:
Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Driving Offences: Speed Limits

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many drivers have been (a) cautioned for and (b) convicted of speeding in (i) St Ives constituency, (ii) Cornwall, (iii) the South West Region, (iv) Greater London and (v) England in the last 12 months. [198383]

Maria Eagle: Available information for 2005 (latest available) is provided in the following table. 2006 data will be available later this year.

Information is available at police force area level only.

Written warnings( 1) issued and findings of guilt at all courts for speeding offences( 2) within Devon and Cornwall police force area, the south west region, Greater London( 3) and England, 2005
Number of offences
Written warnings Findings of guilt

Devon and Cornwall police force area

5,200

South west region

1,600

19,700

Greater London(3)

0

10,700

England

5,500

148,400

(1 )Written warnings only. Formal cautions are not given for summary motoring offence of speeding.
(2 )Offences under the Road Traffic Regulations Act 1984 ss. 16, 81, 84, 86, 88 and 89; Motor Vehicles (Speed Limits on Motorways) Regs 1973; Parks Regulation (Amendment) Act 1926—byelaws made thereunder.
(3 )Metropolitan and city of London police combined.
Notes:
1. 0 means less than 50.
2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Drugs: Misuse

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment has been made of the effectiveness of (a) prisons, ( b) community rehabilitation orders
2 Apr 2008 : Column 1063W
and (c) drug treatment and testing orders in stopping drug taking by offenders. [196929]

Mr. Hanson: There is evidence to support the effectiveness of certain treatments in reducing substance misuse. Treatments which are effective in addressing substance misuse include pharmacotherapies (e.g. methadone); psychological treatments; residential rehabilitation; 12-step treatment; and therapeutic communities(1).

(a) Success of prisons in stopping the drug taking of offenders

The evaluations to date of drug treatment programmes in prisons in the UK suggest that these programmes can reduce re-offending(2).

The best available measure of drug prevalence in prisons is the random mandatory drug testing (rMDT) programme, which routinely tests prisoners chosen at random for panel of drugs. The positive rate for rMDT has dropped from down from 24.4 per cent. in 1996-97 to 8.8 per cent. in 2006-07(3).

NOMS has in place a comprehensive drug treatment framework, based on the National Treatment Agency's revised models of care, to address the different needs of drug-misusers in prison. The interventions available are designed to meet the needs of low, moderate and severe drug misusers irrespective of age, gender or ethnicity.

(b) Success of community rehabilitation orders in stopping the drug taking of offenders

For offences committed on or after 4 April 2005, the Criminal Justice Act 2003 introduced the community order which replaced all previous community sentences, including community rehabilitation orders (CROs) and drug treatment and testing orders (DTTOs), for adult offenders. Under the Act, the court may impose a community order with a drug rehabilitation requirement. It is too early to have an effective assessment.

(c) Success of Drug Treatment and Testing Orders (DTTOs) in stopping the drug taking of offenders

Research(4) concluded that DTTOs can reduce spending on drugs and re-offending, although it was not possible to determine to what extent these changes were due to the DTTO or whether other factors also contributed.


2 Apr 2008 : Column 1064W

Drugs: Rehabilitation

Mr. Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the delivery of drug and alcohol abuse programmes in probation areas in Wales against delivery timetables in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08. [197808]

Mr. Hanson: National guidance to probation areas states that offenders sentenced to a community order with a requirement to attend the accredited offender substance abuse programme (OSAP) should commence the group work programme when their motivation and ability to complete the programme has been assessed. There is no set time given the nature of the lifestyle of those dependent upon alcohol or drugs.

Offenders waiting for a place on OSAP are under the supervision of their offender manager and also may be subject to a drug rehabilitation requirement (DRR). The offender manager will monitor the risk posed by the offender and manage it. Additionally the offender manager will normally prepare offenders for the programmes by carrying out set work.

Electoral Register

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent steps the Government has taken to make voter registration more accessible. [198123]

Bridget Prentice: The Electoral Administration Act 2006 (EA Act) introduced a number of new provisions to make electoral registration more accessible and to enhance the accuracy of the electoral register. These have included:

The Office for National Statistics has recently published electoral registration rates for the UK and as of the 1 December 2007:

In addition, Section 67 of the EA Act requires the Electoral Commission to set and monitor performance standards for electoral services and this will also provide more information about electoral registration and help share best practice.

In light of the Slough Judgment concerning electoral fraud, the Government are currently considering the effectiveness of the new measures and are keeping electoral registration under review to identify initiatives that will further ensure the accuracy and integrity of the electoral register.


Next Section Index Home Page