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3 Apr 2008 : Column 1280W—continued



3 Apr 2008 : Column 1281W

3 Apr 2008 : Column 1282W
2005 2006
Rates per 1,000 women Rates per 1,000 women
Region (SHA) 2006 Under 16 Under 18 Under 16 Under 18

East Midlands

3

16

East of England

3

15

3

15

London

3

16

5

24

North East

5

25

5

18

North West

4

18

4

19

South Central

4

18

3

15

South East Coast

3

16

3

16

South West

3

15

3

15

West Midlands

4

19

4

20

Yorkshire and Humber

4

17

5

19

Wales

3

15

4

17

England and Wales

3.7

17.8

3.9

18.2

(1) Rates for ages under 16 and under 18 are based on populations 13-15 and 15-17 respectively.

Abortion: Gloucestershire

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many abortions have been performed in Gloucestershire in each year since 1990. [198100]

Dawn Primarolo: Data for abortions performed in Gloucestershire are not available. Data for abortions for women resident in Gloucestershire are shown in the following tables.

Abortions to residents of Gloucestershire( 1) , 1990 to 2006
District health authorities (DHA) 1990 to 1991, Gloucester DHA
Total

1990

823

1991

850


District health authorities (DHA) 1992 to 1998, Gloucestershire DHA
Total

1992

1,413

1993

1,361

1994

1,326

1995

1,367

1996

1,497

1997

1,412

1998

1,505


Health Authority (HA) 1999 to 2001, Gloucestershire HA
Total

1999

1,435

2000

1,372

2001

1,452


Primary care trust (PCT) 2002 to 2005
Cheltenham and Tewkesbury Cotswold and Vale Gloucestershire Total

2002

393

374

630

1,397

2003

446

380

648

1,474

2004

457

434

676

1,567

2005

419

343

699

1,461


Primary care trust (PCT), 2006
Gloucestershire Total

2006

1,534

1,534

(1) Boundaries for Gloucestershire changed in 2002, 1999, 2002 and 2006 and totals cannot be compared between groups.
Source:
Department of Health.

AIDS: Finance

Mike Penning: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the cost of treating an AIDS patient (a) in hospital and (b) as an out-patient. [197141]

Dawn Primarolo: The data are not held centrally in the format requested. Costs of treating people with HIV vary depending on the severity of symptoms and level of immune suppression. Estimated annual costs of HIV treatment, including the costs of combination antiretroviral therapies range between £12,000 to £19,000 per person. Treatment is lifelong. Total national health service expenditure on HIV treatment in 2006-07 was £497 million. This was the first year this data has been collected since HIV treatment and care budgets were placed into NHS baselines in 2002-03.

Alcoholic Drinks: Accident and Emergency Departments

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made of the demands on accident and emergency services of each NHS acute hospital trust arising from alcohol consumption; and if he will make a statement. [193438]

Dawn Primarolo: The Government recently assessed alcohol-related demands on accident and emergency (A and E) departments, as part of the evaluation of the impact of the Licensing Act 2003.

The evaluation showed that alcohol-related demands on A and E services appear to have been stable in aggregate, though some individual hospitals have seen increased demands, others a fall.

Information about alcohol-related visits to A and E services is not collected centrally.


3 Apr 2008 : Column 1283W

Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will introduce screening of all patients in primary and secondary care for alcohol misuse. [194338]

Dawn Primarolo: Our policy is not to adopt a universal screening programme for alcohol misuse, as the evidence base indicates this would not be cost-effective. Instead, we are encouraging health care professionals and others to implement opportunistic alcohol case identification and to deliver brief advice about alcohol. This can take place at any opportunity when an individual is consulting with a health care professional or indeed any agency about a health issue, which may have a link to excessive alcohol consumption.

International research has shown that this approach works well in primary care. We believe these results would be replicated in some targeted clinics within secondary care, such as genito-urinary medicine, fracture clinics or facial injury clinics.

While there is good evidence confirming the value of this approach, there are some gaps in the research. This is why the Department has commissioned a programme of research into opportunistic alcohol case identification and delivering brief advice that is now under way in a selection of general practitioner (GP) practices, accident and emergency departments and probation departments. The purpose of this research is to refine which identification tool works best in which setting, with which target groups, and what methods of providing advice are most effective.

We have put in place from April 2008, a new national health service indicator to measure the change in the rate of hospital admissions for alcohol-related harm—the first ever national commitment to monitor how the NHS is tackling alcohol health harms. This indicator is expected to encourage primary care trusts to invest in earlier identification of people who drink too much linked to advice and support from GPs or other health care staff. This has been shown to be the best way of reducing the kind of ‘everyday’ drinking which over time leads to liver disease and other problems.

Aortic Aneurysm

Mr. Spring: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many patients were treated for abdominal aortic aneurysms through (a) endovascular aneurysm repair using a stent graph and (b) open surgical repair in the NHS (i) in England and Wales and (ii) broken down by strategic health authority in each of the last five years; [188518]

(2) how many patients were treated for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections through (a) endovascular aneurysm repair using a stent graph and (b) open surgical repair in the NHS (i) in England and Wales and (ii) broken down by strategic health authority in each of the last five years. [188519]

Ann Keen: This information is not available in the format requested. Using clinical codes, it is not possible to identify endovascular aortic aneurysm repair using a stent graft. Furthermore, in order to adhere to patient
3 Apr 2008 : Column 1284W
confidentiality, incidences of treatment between one and five are suppressed, which is why to break these results down by strategic health authority (SHA) would be infeasible. Data on patients in Wales is not held centrally.

The following table shows the count of finished consultant episodes (FCEs) with a primary diagnosis of aortic aneurysm, broken down by abdominal and thoracic, and a main or secondary procedure of open surgical repair of aortic aneurysm from 2002-03 to 2006-07, which are the latest figures available, in national health service hospitals in England.

Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic aneurysm that crosses both the thoracic and abdominal areas

2006-07

408

4,516

65

2005-06

375

5,017

77

2004-05

375

4,858

65

2003-04

306

4,871

62

2002-03

300

4,718

68

Notes:
1. FCE:
A FCE is defined as a period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. The figures do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the year.
2. Data quality:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are compiled from data sent by over 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. The Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.
3. Assessing growth through time:
HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. During the years that these records have been collected by the NHS, there have been ongoing improvements in quality and coverage. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series.
Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example a number of procedures may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and may no longer be accounted in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time.
4. Diagnosis (primary diagnosis):
The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 14 (seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the HES data set and provides the main reason why the patient was in hospital.
5. Ungrossed data:
Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed).
6. Main operation:
The main operation is the first recorded operation in the HES data set and is usually the most resource intensive procedure performed during the episode. It is appropriate to use main operation when looking at admission details, e.g. time waited, but the figures for ‘all operations count of episodes’ give a more complete count of episodes with an operation.
7. Secondary procedure:
As well as the main operative procedure, there are up to 11 (three prior to 2002-03) secondary operation fields in HES that show secondary or additional procedures performed on the patient during the episode of care.
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The Information Centre for Health and Social Care.

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