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21 Apr 2008 : Column 1556W—continued

Pupil Exclusions

Mr. Love: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils received permanent exclusions for the category of one-off offences, broken down by offence, in (a) primary non-academy schools, (b) primary academy schools, (c) secondary non-academy schools and (d) secondary academy schools in the latest period for which figures are available. [198439]

Kevin Brennan: The numbers of permanent and fixed period exclusions by reason are published annually by the Department in the Statistical First Release ‘DCSF: Permanent and Fixed Period Exclusions from Schools and Exclusion Appeals in England’, the latest of available data cover the school academic year 2005/06 which can be accessed at:


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There are 12 categories describing the various reasons for exclusion and these are detailed in the following table. The reason for exclusion was not collected for primary schools in the academic year
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2005/06. Analysis of academies by reason for exclusion has not been published and could only be produced at disproportionate cost.

Maintained secondary schools( 1,2) : Number and percentage of permanent and fixed period exclusions by reason for exclusion—England, 2005/06
Number of permanent exclusions( 3) Percentage of all permanent exclusions( 3,)( )( 4) Number of fixed period exclusions Percentage of all fixed period exclusions( 4)

Physical assault against a pupil

1,260

16

62,670

18

Physical assault against an adult

740

9

8,240

2

Verbal abuse/ threatening behaviour against a pupil

330

4

12,730

4

Verbal abuse/ threatening behaviour against an adult

900

11

79,370

23

Bullying

80

1

5,270

2

Racist abuse

30

0

3,370

1

Sexual misconduct

110

1

2,620

1

Drug and alcohol related

450

6

8,360

2

Damage

170

2

9,390

3

Theft

220

3

7,770

2

Persistent disruptive behaviour

2,370

30

72,340

21

Other

1,340

17

71,720

21

Total(5)

7,990

100

343,840

100

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed.
(2) For the 2005/06 school year, information on the reason for exclusion was collected via the School Census for the first time for secondary schools only (the Termly Exclusions Survey has discontinued). For exclusions during 2006/07, information on the reason for exclusion will also be collected from primary and special schools. See Notes to Editors 2.
(3) Estimates based on incomplete pupil level data. See Notes to Editors 4.
(4) The number of exclusions by reason expressed as a percentage of the total number of exclusions.
(5) There were 2 permanent and 4 fixed period exclusions for which circumstance was not known—these were included in the ‘total’ column only.
Note:
Totals may not appear to equal the sum of component parts because numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.
Source:
School Census

Pupils: Absenteeism

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many pupils took authorised absence in (a) 1997 and (b) 2007. [182748]

Kevin Brennan: The available information for the academic year 1996/97 is shown in the table.

The latest available information for 2007 covers autumn term 2006 and spring term 2007 and is shown in the table.

Maintained primary and secondary schools, and city technology colleges( 1) : authorised absence by type of school, 1996/97, England
Number of day pupils of compulsory school age Authorised absence Percentage of half days missed( 2)

Maintained primary schools

3,770,800

5.60

Maintained secondary schools

2,790,040

8.10

City technology colleges

12,308

6.10

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed.
(2) The number of sessions missed due to authorised absence expressed as a percentage of the total number of possible sessions.
Note:
Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.
Source:
School Absence Survey

Maintained primary and secondary schools, city technology colleges and academies( 1) : authorised absence by type of school, autumn term 2006 and spring term 2007, England
Number of day pupils of compulsory school age( 2) Number of pupil enrolments( 3, 4) Authorised absence Percentage of half days missed( 5) :

Maintained primary schools

3,306,940

3,428,390

4.73

Secondary schools(6)

2,954,940

3,016,240

6.30

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed.
(2) Pupil numbers are as at January 2007. Includes pupils aged five to 15 with sole and dual (main) registration. Excludes boarders.
(3 )Number of pupil enrolments in schools between 1 September 2006 and 9 April 2007. Includes pupils on the school roll for at least one session who are aged between five and 15, excluding boarders. Some pupils may be counted more than once (if they moved schools during the school year or are registered in more than one school).
(4 )There were some 32,498 cases from primary schools 17,238 cases from maintained secondary schools, CTCS and academies for whom absence data were missing. These cases have been excluded from the total number of pupil enrolments.
(5 )The number of sessions missed due to authorised absence expressed as a percentage of the total number of possible sessions.
(6 )Includes maintained secondary schools, city technology colleges and academies.
Note:
Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.
Source:
School Census

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Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of persistent absentees from school obtained (a) five GCSEs A*-C and (b) five GCSEs A*-C including English and mathematics in the last period for which figures are available. [200099]

Jim Knight: The information can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Pupils: Assessments

Mr. Lidington: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will place in the Library details of the formula used to adjust the scores of school pupils over key stages 3 and 4 in order to measure contextual value added for a school. [188732]

Jim Knight: I am placing a copy of the relevant formulae in the Library. These include methodologies for both maintained mainstream and special schools.

Pupils: English Language

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of (a) primary schools, (b) secondary schools and (c) sixth form colleges had teachers who worked overtime to teach children with English as an additional language in the latest period for which figures are available. [199355]

Jim Knight: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of (a) secondary schools and (b) sixth form colleges are running the International English Language Testing System; what the estimated costs are of running the International English Language Testing System; and what financial support local authorities provide for schools and sixth form colleges running the International English Language Testing System. [199356]

Jim Knight: No secondary schools or sixth form colleges ran the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) last year. Information for 2007-08 is not yet available.

Until 2007-08, IELTS was funded as an exception to all other International English language qualifications. However, from September 2007 the newly accredited IELTS qualification, now called Cambridge ESOL certificate in English, is not eligible for LSC funding.

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in (i) Basingstoke, (ii) Hampshire and (iii) England have (A) at least one specialist teaching assistant for pupils with English as an additional language, (B) at least one lead teacher for ethnic minority pupils, (C) at least one specialist teaching assistant for pupils with English as an additional language and one lead teacher for ethnic minority pupils and (D) more than one specialist teaching assistant for pupils with English as
21 Apr 2008 : Column 1560W
an additional language and a lead teacher for ethnic minority pupils. [199358]

Jim Knight: Information for the number of specialist teaching assistant, for additional language, is not collected centrally,

The following table shows the number of schools in Basingstoke constituency, Hampshire local authority and England that had at least one teacher recorded for ethnic minority pupils in January 2007.

N umber of local authority maintained primary and secondary schools in Basingstoke constituency, Hampshire local authority and England which have at least one teacher recorded for ethnic mi notify pupils, January 2007
Basingstoke Hampshire England

Primary

Number of schools

1

5

1,218

Percentage of total

2.5

1.2

7,0

Secondary

Number of schools

3

399

Percentage of total

42

11.9

Source: School Census

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what support from local authorities is available to schools to provide resources to teach children who have English as an additional language; what assessment has been made of the adequacy of this support; and if he will make a statement. [199359]

Jim Knight: The number of pupils for whom English is an additional language (EAL) rose from 500,000 to 790,000 between 1997 and 2007. Let me put that in perspective. Such children now comprise 12 per cent. of all pupils as against 7.5 per cent. in 1997 and 9 per cent. in 2001. Funding for EAL children has fully kept pace with these increasing numbers through

These increases form part of the substantial overall increase in school funding. Over the past 10 years since 1997, overall per pupil revenue funding for schools has increased by 67 per cent. in real terms. We expect local authorities to be able to manage new pressures from within these increases, and to ensure that the resources reach the individual schools affected by new arrivals and EAL speakers.


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The Government’s policy is to encourage rapid English language acquisition as the key to successful integration into the UK education system and the wider community.

Newly arrived pupils are given additional help in learning English by specialist advisers and teachers of English as an additional language (EAL) and bilingual classroom assistants, who work in collaboration with classroom teachers to plan lessons and teaching materials. The evidence indicates that EAL pupils typically catch up with their peers in attainment terms within two years of first admission to a school a England.

The Government recently launched a new arrivals excellence programme intended to provide practical support for local authorities, schools and individual teachers. This programme is backed by other practical support including measures to improve the supply, training and qualifications of EAL specialist staff, and to deliver new web-based teaching and learning materials.


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