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Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry: Finance

David T.C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department paid to the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry in each year since 1997; and what the purpose of each such payment was. [199685]


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Mr. Bradshaw: The Department’s financial records only go back to April 2001 and they show that no payments have been made to the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry for the period April 2001 to March 2008.

Byotrol: Finance

David T.C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department paid to Byotrol in each year since 1997; and what the purpose of each such payment was. [199686]

Mr. Bradshaw: The Department’s financial records only go back to April 2001 and they show that no payments have been made to Byotrol for the period April 2001 to March 2008.

Cardiovascular System: Screening

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the criteria are for assessing someone as being at (a) low, (b) moderate and (c) high risk as a result of a vascular risk assessment as referred to in Putting Prevention First. [198843]

Ann Keen: In terms of assessing personal risk following a vascular risk assessment, a person would be classified at high risk with the presence of one or more of the following:

At moderate risk with the presence of one or more of the following and without any of the high risk factors:

and at low risk in the absence of any of the high or medium risk factors detailed.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the costs associated with the vascular risk assessment programme, as proposed in Putting Prevention First; and what proportion of that cost he estimates will arise from (i) the risk assessment process and (ii) consequent interventions. [198849]

Ann Keen: We estimate the costs associated with the vascular risk assessment programme will be in the order of £250 million per annum once the programme reaches full implementation. Of this, an estimated 10 to 15 per cent. is the cost of the risk assessments themselves (ie the cost of the work force time and laboratory tests required for the assessment). The remainder of the costs will fund the consequent interventions.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the difference between take-up rates by men and women of vascular risk assessments. [198850]


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Ann Keen: In modelling the proposed systems of vascular checks we have a 75 per cent. uptake for both men and women. There is no relevant reliable data on likely differences in gender uptake. In working with stakeholders on how best to implement and deliver the policy, we will look at ways of ensuring the highest take up amongst all sections of the population between the ages of 40 and 74.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what risk assessment tool his Department used in modelling the effects of the proposed vascular risk assessment programme, published in Putting Prevention First. [198851]

Ann Keen: The risk assessment tool used to assess for cardiovascular risk (ie coronary heart disease and stroke) was Qrisk. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence is publishing guidelines on lipid modification later this year and these will be considered once their recommendations are available. We are currently refining the risk assessment tool for diabetes. In modelling a system of vascular checks, we have used the FINDRISC questionnaire to identify people who should go on to have their blood glucose measured. To assess risk for chronic kidney disease we are using a high blood pressure reading.

Care Homes: Inspections

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will place a copy of the Commission for Social Care Inspection's code of practice for inspectors of care homes in the Library. [196656]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: We have been informed by the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) that it does not have a specific code of practice for inspectors. CSCI issues a set of employment standards which apply to all staff, not just inspectors. There are eight standards:

Copies of the Standards have been placed in the Library.

Care Homes: North East

Mr. Kemp: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) private, (b) public and (c) voluntary sector care homes for the elderly in the North East were subject to regulation and inspection by the Commission for Social Care Inspection in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [197261]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: Information on the numbers of care homes active in the North East region and subject to regulation and inspection by the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) since 2002-03 is shown in the following table.


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Homes are not registered by CSCI as, for example, care homes for older people. CSCI inspectors will decide at the time of an inspection whether to inspect a home against the national minimum standards (NMS) for care homes for older people or vulnerable adults. This decision is based on the age profile of the occupants of the home.

The figures in the following table are the number of homes active at the end of each financial year that had been inspected against the standards for older people (though not necessarily during the year in question).

Number of care homes active at end financial year (31 March) in the CSCI N orth E ast r egion inspected against national minimum standards for care homes for older people
Financial year
Type of ownership 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07

Local authority

29

61

54

47

41

National health service

1

1

1

1

Other

1

2

2

2

Private

434

483

495

481

476

Voluntary

32

39

37

36

40

Total

496

586

589

567

558

Source:
CSCI registration and inspection database.

Child Health

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will place in the Library copies of the appendices to the Child Health Interim Application Options Appraisal Process final report. [176948]

Mr. Bradshaw: The following appendices have been placed in the Library: 1; 2; 3; 5; 6; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; 14; 15 and 16. It is not possible to publish appendices 4, 7, 13 and 17 because approval was not granted by the suppliers of the information, as the documents are commercially sensitive.

Childbirth

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 25 March 2008, Official Report, columns 13-14W, on childbirth, what the (a) terms of reference and (b) timetable of the national perinatal epidemiology unit's programme of reviews are; and if he will make a statement. [198743]

Ann Keen: The National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit is conducting the programme of systematic reviews referred to in my previous answer in line with a research proposal that has been peer reviewed and agreed with the Department. The primary aim is to make best use of existing national and international research evidence to identify the key interventions that are most likely to contribute to meeting the 2010 infant mortality target and, in the longer term, to improving maternal and child health and a sustainable reduction in health inequalities. The reviews will also help identify evidence gaps where there is a need for new research.

The work runs until September 2009, and the research team will provide outputs on a staged basis during the life of the project. Review outputs will cover generic public health interventions as well as the major
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medical causes of infant mortality. The research team have appointed a multi-disciplinary advisory group to support the work.

Children: Health

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will estimate the likely cost of introducing mandatory weighing and measuring of all children in England in each year. [199454]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department has no intentions to introduce mandatory weighing and measuring of all children in England in each year, and has therefore not estimated the likely cost of a mandatory programme. Furthermore, we do not intend to make it mandatory for children or parents to participate in the current programme of weighing and measuring pupils in reception year and year six.

Chlamydia

Anne Milton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people were diagnosed with chlamydia in each year since 1997-98; and what proportion in each year were (a) men and (b) women. [197823]

Dawn Primarolo: Table 1 shows the number of uncomplicated chlamydia infections diagnosed in genito-urinary medicine (GUM) clinics in England from 1997 to 2006, by sex. Table 2 shows the percentage of uncomplicated chlamydia infections diagnosed in men and women in GUM clinics in England from 1997 to 2006.

The National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP) does not undertake diagnostic testing as it provides screening to asymptomatic people in England. Table 3 shows the number of positive chlamydia screens by sex among those aged 13 to 24 years who were screened for chlamydia as part of the NCSP during the period 2003-07. Table 4 shows the proportion of male and female of the positive screens among those aged 13 to 24 years as part of the NCSP for the period 2003-07.

Table 1: The number of uncomplicated chlamydia infections diagnosed in GUM clinics in England, by sex, 1997-2006
Men Women Total

1997

16,180

22,659

38,839

1998

18,937

24,975

43,912

1999

21,776

29,184

50,960

2000

26,579

34,791

61,370

2001

29,562

38,618

68,180

2002

34,331

43,786

78,117

2003

37,996

47,520

85,516

2004

42,681

50,267

92,948

2005

45,155

50,775

95,930

2006

48,863

50,367

99,230



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Table 2: The proportion of uncomplicated chlamydia infections diagnosed in men and women in GUM clinics in England; 1997-2006
Percentage
Men Women

1997

42

58

1998

43

57

1999

43

57

2000

43

57

2001

43

57

2002

44

56

2003

44

56

2004

46

54

2005

47

53

2006

49

51

Notes: 1. The data available from the KC60 statutory returns are for diagnoses made in GUM clinics only. Diagnoses made in other clinical settings, such as general practice, are not recorded in the KC60 dataset. 2. The data available from the KC60 statutory returns are the number of diagnoses made, not the number of patients diagnosed. Individual patients may have more than one diagnosis in a year. 3. The information provided has been adjusted for missing clinic data. 4. Data are not yet available for 2007. . Data are collected by calendar year.

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