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22 Apr 2008 : Column 1988W—continued


Departmental Procurement

Mr. Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress has been made on rationalisation of his Department’s processes for the procurement of goods and services in the last 12 months. [197643]

Mr. Bradshaw: Over the last year the Department has rationalised its supplier base, cleansed its purchase order system and conducted an exercise to populate a new contracts database.


22 Apr 2008 : Column 1989W

The Department has also set up a procurement centre of expertise to make sure that good procurement practice is followed by influencing all its non-pay expenditure on goods and services.

The Department is also developing a new finance, human resources and purchasing system to standardise its business processes.

Eating Disorders

Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people were admitted to hospital for eating disorders in each of the last five years, broken down by (a) region, (b) sex and (c) those aged (i) under 10, (ii) 10 to 18 and (iii) over 18 years. [199941]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The information requested has been placed in the Library.

Health Innovation Council

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when the Health Innovation Council first met; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the (a) agenda, (b) remit and (c) minutes. [198355]

Dawn Primarolo: The Health Innovation Council first met on 27 November 2007. The role of the council is to provide strategic advice on how to further develop innovation in health and social care. Copies of the terms of reference, agendas and agreed notes of meetings have been placed in the Library and are also available on the Department’s website at:

Health Services: Prisons

Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many cases of each notifiable disease were diagnosed in each of Her Majesty's Prisons in each of the last five years. [199943]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The information requested is not collected. Disease surveillance is the responsibility of the Health Protection Agency (HPA). Prisons are not currently specifically identified in HPA surveillance systems.

JP Morgan

David T.C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department paid to JP Morgan in each year since 1997; and what the purpose of each payment was. [199615]

Mr. Bradshaw: The Department’s financial records only go back to April 2001 and they show that no payments have been made to JP Morgan for the period April 2001 to March 2008.

Macular Degeneration: Drugs

Mr. Swire: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he expects Avastin to be available on NHS prescription for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration. [199827]


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Dawn Primarolo: Avastin is not currently licensed for the treatment of wet-age related macular degeneration. A clinician may prescribe a drug outside its licensed indications (off licence or off label), provided their local primary care trust agree to supply it at national health service expense.

Medical Records: Disclosure of Information

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether patients will be able to opt out of having (a) their detailed patient information, (b) their basic patient information including prescription and allergy details and (c) their demographic information, including name, date of birth, address and NHS number uploaded to Spine or placed on their summary care record. [195204]

Mr. Bradshaw: Patients are able to opt out of having both their basic clinical information, including medication and allergy details, and their detailed clinical information, uploaded to the ‘spine’, the national database of key information about patients’ health and care within the care records service (NHS CRS), by choosing not to have a summary care record.

Patients are not able to prevent their basic demographic and contact details from being held within the NHS CRS. The NHS has maintained registers of its service users from the earliest days of its existence to support the delivery of health care. A record is also kept of which general practice each patient is registered with, and reasons of efficiency and probity require this to be held centrally, for example to prevent multiple GPs from being paid for the same patient, and to ensure that the correct commissioning body meets the cost of care provided. A register is also needed to enable the Secretary of State to meet the obligation to provide health care, free at the point of contact, for those patients who are ordinarily resident in England.

While for these reasons it is not practicable to give patients choice about whether their demographic details will be held in the system, safeguards have been built into the NHS CRS personal demographics service (PDS) which allow an individual’s contact details to be hidden from NHS staff if patients request this level of protection.

Mental Health Services: Young People

Susan Kramer: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many 16 and 17-year-olds were treated by adult mental health services (a) at the most recent date and (b) in each year for which figures are available. [198601]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: Information is not available in the format requested. However, the number of bed days on adult psychiatric wards of patients aged 16 or 17 was 29,306 in 2005-06 and 19,988 in 2006-07. These are the only years for which we have information available. The statistical basis for collecting this information changed between the two years and the figures are not directly comparable. Guidance was issued in 2005-06 to address anomalies of reporting of bed days for patients passing their 16th or 18th birthdays while in hospital.


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The Mental Health Act 2007 contains a provision (section 31) that ensures that patients aged under 18 are treated in an environment in hospital, which is suitable having regard to their age (subject to their needs). The Government have made a commitment to commence this provision in England by April 2010. We provided capital funding of £31 million in 2007-08 for 17 projects specifically designed to help eliminate the inappropriate use of adult psychiatric wards for children and young people.

Mentally Ill

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how the NHS measures the capability of patients with a history of violent behaviour induced by mental illness to be reintegrated into society; [199653]

(2) what provisions the NHS has in place for the reintegration of patients with a history of mental illness and violence back into society; what factors are taken into account before reintegration takes place; and what budget was allocated to such reintegration policies in each of the last 10 years. [199654]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: Safety for the individual service user, their families, staff and the general public is central to all good healthcare. This is particularly important in mental health services. Risk assessment and risk management are central to planning safe and effective care for individuals who may be a risk to themselves or others. Effective discharge planning from inpatient care and rehabilitation in the community rely on appropriate clinical risk assessment and risk management. As an integral part of clinical care this is not something that is costed separately and therefore we do not have the information requested held centrally.

To help manage people effectively and safely in the community we introduced community treatment orders in the Mental Health Act 2007. While it is not possible to say that they will prevent all episodes of violence, they will usefully be employed in the treatment of individuals with a history of non-compliance in the community, potentially reducing the risks they pose to themselves or others.

The Department has also recently published Best practice in managing risk: principles and guidance for best practice in the assessment and management of risk to self and others in mental health services. It underpins risk assessment with principles of good practice for all mental health settings and provides a list of tools offering structure to risk management.

The Department has also published its review of the care programme approach (CPA), including how risk assessment and management is incorporated into CPA systems. CPA is the system of assessment, planning and a review of care for people receiving secondary mental health services.

Mr. Brady: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many hospital admissions related to episodes of psychosis there were in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available; [199944]

(2) how many hospital admissions related to episodes of schizophrenia there were in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available. [199998]


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Mr. Ivan Lewis: The information is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available is shown in the following tables.

Table 1 shows finished admission episodes (FAEs) with primary or secondary diagnosis of schizophrenia.

Table 2 shows FAEs with primary or secondary diagnosis of psychosis.

Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.

Table 1: Counts of FAEs for selected primary diagnoses and primary and secondary diagnoses of *schizophrenia—national health service hospitals England and activity performed in the independent sector in England commissioned by English NHS
Primary diagnoses of *schizophrenia( 1) Primary and secondary diagnoses of *schizophrenia( 2)

1995-96

25,065

33,267

1996-97

25,224

34,267

1997-98

24,627

34,525

1998-99

27,211

37,858

1999-2000

26,091

37,231

2000-01

25,540

37,072

2001-02

26,035

37,873

2002-03

26,267

39,808

2003-04

25,543

40,763

2004-05

26,570

44,279

2005-06

24,571

45,054

2006-07

23,041

45,955


Table 2: Counts of finished admission episodes for selected primary diagnoses and primary and secondary diagnoses of *psychosis—NHS hospitals England and activity performed in the independent sector in England commissioned by English NHS
Primary diagnoses of psychosis( 1) Primary and secondary diagnoses of psychosis( 2)

1995-96

84,813

141,031

1996-97

83,908

142,805

1997-98

81,186

142,131

1998-99

85,622

151,247

1999-2000

82,135

152,387

2000-01

78,195

150,943

2001-02

78,791

157,587

2002-03

80,444

170,149

2003-04

76,615

176,776

2004-05

77,497

192,526

2005-06

72,014

201,446

2006-07

67,004

213,624

(1) Primary diagnoses of *schizophrenia: These figures represent a count of FAEs where the selected diagnosis codes for schizophrenia was mentioned in the primary diagnosis field.
(2) Primary and secondary diagnoses of *schizophrenia: These figures represent a count of FAEs where the selected diagnosis codes for schizophrenia was mentioned in any of the 14 (seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in a HES record. A record is counted only once if any of these codes recorded more than once in diagnoses fields.
Notes:
1. FAEs:
A FAE is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. Please note that admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.
2. Diagnosis (primary diagnosis)
The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 14 (seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was in hospital.
3.Secondary diagnoses
As well as the primary diagnosis, there are up to 13 (six prior to 2002-03) secondary diagnosis fields in (HES) that show other diagnoses relevant to the episode of care.
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care

22 Apr 2008 : Column 1993W

Mentally Ill: Children

Susan Kramer: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many children in England and Wales have been diagnosed with a mental health disorder. [198603]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: We do not routinely collect this information. However, a 2004 survey by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) found that 9.6 per cent. of children in Great Britain aged between five and 16 suffered from some kind of mental disorder. The survey was based on interviews with a sample of parents and children. The full results are published in the ONS report Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, a copy of this publication has been placed in the Library.


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