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25 Apr 2008 : Column 2328W—continued

Tree Preservation Orders: Guildford

Anne Milton: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 25 February 2008, Official Report, column 1130W, on tree preservation orders: Guildford, what the latest timetable is for the disposal of the Epsom Road site. [196076]

Joan Ruddock: The current disposal timetable for the Epsom road site is:

The timings of (b) and (c) may be subject to variation in response to the written bids received.


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Home Department

Alcoholic Drinks: Children

Mr. Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many children were (a) cautioned, (b) prosecuted and (c) given a penalty notice for disorder for knowingly consuming alcohol on licensed premises in each of the last two years. [191308]

Mr. Coaker: The number of young persons under 18 who were issued with a reprimand or final warning, penalty notice for disorder, or proceeded against at magistrates courts for the offence of knowingly consuming alcohol by an under 18 on relevant premises in England and Wales for the years 2005 to 2006 can be viewed in the attached tables 1 and 2.

From June 2000, cautions for offenders under 18 years old were replaced by reprimands and final warnings.

N umber of young persons under 18 years issued with a reprimand or final warning, and proceeded against at magistrates' courts for a certain alcohol offence in England and Wales for the years 2005 - 06( 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
2005 2006
Offence description Proceeded against Reprimanded/final warning( 3)

Individual aged under 18 knowingly consumes alcohol.

2

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis. (2) Data includes the following offence descriptions and corresponding statutes: Individual aged under 18 knowingly consumes alcohol. Licensing Act 2003 S.150 (1) (3) From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and final warnings. Reprimands and final warnings are included in the above data. (4) The Licensing Act 2003 came into force on 24 November 2005. (5) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts, other agencies, and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source: Court proceedings data held by RDS - Office for Criminal Justice Reform - Ministry of Justice

N umber of persons issued with a penalty notice for disorder for the offence of consumption of alcohol by under 18 on relevant premises in England and Wales for the years 2006 - 06( 1, 2, 3, 4,)
Number

2005

84

2006

75

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis. (2) Data includes the following offence descriptions and corresponding statutes: Consumption of alcohol by a person under 18 on relevant premises. Licensing Act 2003 S.150(1) (3) New legislative reference with effect from 24 November 2005. (4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts, other agencies, and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source: Court proceedings data held by RDS - Office for Criminal Justice Reform - Ministry of Justice

Asylum

Mr. Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of asylum applications received but not yet determined at the latest date for which figures are available. [197638]


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Mr. Byrne: The number of cases recorded as awaiting an initial decision and the number of cases recorded as awaiting an appeal determination is published quarterly and annually. Copies of asylum statistics publications are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics website at:

Bail

Ann Winterton: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) for what duration a non-terrorist suspect may be held on continuous bail without being charged; how many times during that period bail may be renewed; and how long a suspect may be held in custody after reporting in at the time limit of continuous bail before bail is renewed again without a charge being brought; [199467]

(2) for how long a non-terrorist suspect may be held in custody without being charged before any type of bail is set; [199468]

(3) what powers the police have to hold in custody a non-terrorist suspect who has not been charged with any offence but who has broken the time limit for continuous bail; and for how long such a suspect may be held in custody for breaking bail. [199469]

Mr. McNulty: Part IV of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (PACE) 1984 sets out the statutory time limit of 96 hours for an arrested person to be detained at a police station. The custody officer is required to consider whether reasonable grounds exist to believe that detention without charge is necessary or whether bail should be granted. The detention of a person is subject to review by the Review Officer and consideration of extensions of detention from 24 hours to 36 hours is subject to the authority of a Superintendent. Any period in excess of 36 hours is subject to the authority of a magistrate. The detainee must be charged with an offence or referred to the CPS for a charging decision when the custody officer considers there is a realistic prospect of conviction. When bail is granted prior to charge, any time the suspect spends at the police station in answering bail counts towards the detention time limits set out in PACE.

There are no statutory time limits on the period for which a suspect may be released on bail or on the number of occasions in which bail may be granted.

Community Calls to Action

Mr. Pickles: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department for what reasons the provisions relating to community calls to action introduced under the Police and Justice Act 2006 have not been implemented. [199581]

Mr. McNulty: The Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act contained an amendment to Section 19 of the Police and Justice Act 2006. This amendment brought together the two models for Community Calls for Actions. The Home Office and the Department for Communities and Local Government are now working together to develop plans for implementation.


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We have always been clear that the implementation of these provisions would need to give proper consideration to the wider local accountability agenda. We are therefore keen to ensure that implementation of these provisions properly takes into account the findings of Sir Ronnie Flanagan’s independent review of policing, along with the proposals to be set out in both Louise Casey’s review ‘Connecting Communities with the fight against crime’ and the Home Office’s Policing Green Paper both of which will be published later this year.

Community Policing

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has to extend the initiative of distributing in areas of high crime key fobs bearing the name, photograph and contact details of community police officers; and if she will make a statement. [195695]

Mr. McNulty: By April 2008, every community in England and Wales will have a neighbourhood policing team of police officers and police community support officers in place. The teams are dedicated to working with their local communities, agreeing priorities for action and informing the public of their progress. This engagement process has already begun in many places and it will now be developed and extended across all areas of England and Wales.

A new ‘Name in Every Neighbourhood’ campaign will be running for the coming weeks to make sure people in all areas know their own local Neighbourhood Policing team and how to contact them.

Local communications activity will vary from force to force as they pursue a number of different ideas and innovations to build familiarity and understanding in the most effective manner to suit local circumstances.

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent requests she has received from foreign (a) governments and (b) police forces for information on community policing methods in the UK. [198589]

Mr. McNulty: The successful implementation of neighbourhood policing across England and Wales has attracted wide interest and Home Office officials have met with delegations from foreign governments and police forces including Serbia, Mongolia, the United Arab Emirates and Azerbaijan about neighbourhood policing in the UK.

During the Anglo-French summit in London on 27 March my right hon. Friend the Home Secretary met with her colleague, Michele Alliot-Marie, the Minister of the Interior, Overseas France and Local Authorities, and agreed that we would hold a neighbourhood policing seminar in Paris in May.

Community Support Officers: Powers

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has to review the powers of police community support officers in different parts of the country. [199335]


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Mr. McNulty: The National Policing Improvement Agency is currently conducting a review relating to the PCSO role, including powers.

The review is expected to report this summer and to make recommendations. PCSOs derive their powers from Section 38A of the Police Reform Act 2002. Under the provisions of the Act, the Secretary of State introduced on 1 December 2007 a list of standard powers that apply to all PCSOs in England and Wales. The Home Office has just completed the 2007 audit of current PCSO powers. The results are being analysed and will be placed on the Home Office website in May 2008. A table giving the results of the 2006 PCSO Powers audit may be found on the website at:

The webpage also provides the list of the standard and discretionary powers available to PCSOs.

Crimes of Violence: Maldon

Mr. Whittingdale: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many crimes of violence against the person were recorded in Maldon and East Chelmsford constituency in each of the last five years. [201920]

Mr. Coaker: Statistics are not collected specifically on a constituency basis. The Home Office does publish statistics at crime and disorder reduction partnership (CDRP) area level. The number of offences of violence against the person for each of the last five years by CDRP is available on the Home Office website at:

Also available is a look-up table that identifies which constituencies are associated with CDRPs. In many instances, a CDRP may comprise of more than one constituency. Conversely, some constituencies will come within two or more CDRPs, either wholly or partially. The look-up table is available at:

Copies of both the statistics table and the look-up table are available in the Library.

Crimes of Violence: Wandsworth

Justine Greening: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many crimes of violence against the person have been recorded in (a) Putney constituency and (b) the London borough of Wandsworth in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement. [201557]

Mr. Coaker: Statistics are not collected specifically on a constituency basis. The Home Office does publish statistics at crime and disorder reduction partnership (CDRP) area level (including Wandsworth). The number of offences of violence against the person for each of the last five years by CDRP is available on the Home Office website at:

Also available is a look-up table that identifies which constituencies are associated with CDRPs. In many instances, a CDRP may comprise of more than one
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constituency. Conversely, some constituencies will come within two or more CDRPs, either wholly or partially. The look-up table is available at:

Copies of both the statistics table and the look-up table are available in the Library.

Criminal Records

Danny Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what percentage of the population had a criminal record in each year since 1980. [200792]

Maria Eagle: I have been asked to reply.

The information which has been requested is not routinely collected.

Figures on the proportions of the population with a criminal history in England and Wales can be found in ‘Criminal careers of those born between 1953 and 1978’ at:

The bulletin gives figures for offenders who have had a court conviction for a ‘standard list’ offence. ‘Standard list’ offences include all indictable and certain of the more serious summary offences. This publication follows those born in particular years to analyse the percentage of the population with a criminal history. The years followed are 1953, 1958, 1963, 1968, 1973 and 1978. Table 1 of the publication shows that by the age of 45 32.6 per cent. of males and 8.7 per cent. of females born in 1953 had a criminal record in England and Wales.

Demonstrations: Parliament Square

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what representations she has received on the removal of banners and other materials from Parliament Square; and if she will make a statement; [192532]

(2) on which occasions banners and other materials have been removed by the police from Parliament Square; and if she will make a statement. [192533]

Mr. McNulty: The removal of banners and other materials from Parliament Square is a matter for the Metropolitan Police and the Greater London Authority in as far as Parliament Square Garden is concerned.

We have received representations from a number of Members of Parliament, Peers and members of the public who have expressed concern about the tents, mess and noise from the permanent encampment opposite Carriage Gates.

I am informed by the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police that on 23 May 2006 the police took action to seize Mr Haw's banners following his failure to comply with the terms of some of the conditions which had been imposed by the police on his demonstration.

Having consulted widely on managing protests around Parliament and having considered the arguments on how best to balance competing rights in
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the context of a dynamic security situation, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor announced on 25 March that we are proposing to repeal sections 132 to 138 of the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005. In moving to repeal these provisions, we are also inviting the views of Parliament on whether additional provision is needed to ensure that the operation of Parliament is safeguarded. Our view is that Parliament is well placed to decide what needs to be secured to ensure that Members of both Houses are able freely to discharge their responsibilities. We invite their views on whether additional provisions is needed, for example to keep open the passages leading to the Palace of Westminster and to ensure that excessive noise is not used to disrupt the working of Parliament.


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