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25 Apr 2008 : Column 2379W—continued

Young Offenders: Custodial Treatment

Mr. Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many children assessed as vulnerable by the Youth Justice Board were in (a) young offender institutions and (b) secure training centres at the latest date for which figures are available. [201649]

Mr. Hanson: Youth Offending Teams' assessments no longer make a simple distinction between “vulnerable” and “not vulnerable”. The Youth Justice Board found that these terms were too general to provide a sound basis for decision-making. Instead, risk factors such as previous self-harm, mental health or drug dependency issues are recorded. This information is used by the Board's Placement Team to decide on the most appropriate type of accommodation for the young person in question.

Mr. Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many of those in custody (a) between 10 and 13 years old, (b) between 14 and 16 years old and (c) aged 17 or 18 years old were being held (i) less than 30, (ii) between 31 and 50, (iii) between 51 and 100 and (iv) more than 100 miles from home at the latest date for which figures are available. [201650]

Mr. Hanson: The following table gives the available information, supplied by the Youth Justice Board, about distance from home of young people in custody, as at 29 February 2008. Details of home addresses are held for 92 per cent. of the under-18 custodial population: information about the remaining 8 per cent. is not available. Address information for 18-year-olds is not collated centrally.


25 Apr 2008 : Column 2380W
Age group Less than 30 miles 31 to 50 miles 51 to 100 miles More than 100 miles

10-13

11

3

13

4

14-16

477

341

327

132

17

528

388

307

131

Source: Data supplied by the Youth Justice Board from administrative computer systems.

Young Offenders: Greater London

Nick Herbert: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders in Greater London aged 10 to 17 years were sentenced for (a) robbery and (b) violence against the person in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2007. [200137]

Mr. Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders in Greater London aged 10 to 17 years were sentenced for (a) robbery and (b) violence against the person in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2007. [200207]

Mr. Straw: The available information is contained in the table. The data are for 1997 and 2006, the latest year for which annual published statistics are available.

Statistics for 2007 will be published in the autumn.

Number of persons aged 10 to 17 sentenced( 1) in Greater London, all courts, 1997, 2006
Number of persons
Offence group 1997 2006

Greater London( 2)

Robbery

676

1,544

Violence against the person

752

1,093

(1) Principal offence basis.
(2) Includes Metropolitan and City of London Police Force Areas.
Note:
These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.
Source:
RDS-NOMS, Ministry of Justice

Nick Herbert: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many persistent young offenders were sentenced in courts in Greater London in each year since 1997. [200138]

Mr. Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many persistent young offenders were sentenced in courts in Greater London in each year since 1997. [200208]

Mr. Straw: A persistent young offender is a young person aged 10 to 17 who has been sentenced by any criminal court in the UK on three or more separate occasions for one or more recordable offence, and within three years of the last sentencing occasion is subsequently arrested or has an information laid against them for a further recordable offence.

Overall timeliness statistics and caseloads counts on Persistent Young Offenders (PYOs) are available from 1997 to 2007. These statistics are used to monitor the pledge to halve the average time from arrest to sentence for dealing with PYOs in England and Wales from 142 days in 1996 to 71 days.


25 Apr 2008 : Column 2381W

Counts of offenders split by the Criminal Justice System (CIS) areas of the sentencing court are not readily available. Instead, the table presents figures for offenders first arrested or reported in the Metropolitan police area. This is because local area figures are most accurately derived from the Police National Computer on this basis.

The table shows the number of PYOs assigned to the Metropolitan police force in each year since 1997. The increase in the number of PYO convictions is broadly consistent with the increase we have seen in recent years in the number of all offences brought to justice. In the year to September 2007 there were 1.44 million offences brought to justice—an increase of 44 per cent. on 2001-02. This reflects improvements in the performance of the CJS, rather than an increase in the level of crime. Recorded crime has been falling since 2003-04. The increase in those meeting the PYO definition is partly a consequence of improvements in the timeliness of dealing with such offenders.

The definition of a PYO relies on counting successive sentencing occasions for a single offender during a limited time period. Speedier operation of the youth justice system has markedly reduced the average time taken from arrest to sentence, and as a result the number of offenders who fall within scope of the PYO definition has increased at national level. This was a particular issue from 1997 to 2002, the period during which these timeliness improvements were taking effect.

Key statistics on persistent young offenders (PYOs) in the Metropolitan police force area, 1997-2007
Number of PYOs Arrest to sentence interval (days)

1997

864

141

1998

1,003

125

1999

1,091

108

2000

1,100

93

2001

1,297

100

2002

1,325

83

2003

1,251

77

2004

1,324

85

2005

1,329

86

2006

1,486

85

2007

1,769

70


The Ministry of Justice (MOJ) publishes the data in the above table as National Statistics. Further
25 Apr 2008 : Column 2382W
information on persistent young offenders can be found on the dedicated page of the Ministry of Justice website:

Health

Abortion: Drugs

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 20 March 2008, Official Report, column 1312, how many deaths attributed to adverse reactions to RU486 other than those reported to the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency there have been since 1993. [200425]

Dawn Primarolo: I refer the hon. Member to my previous answer of 20 March 2008, Official Report, column 1312.

Alcoholic Drinks: Counselling

Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people were referred to alcohol counselling services in each of the last five years, broken down by (a) region, (b) sex and (c) those aged (i) under 10, (ii) 10 to 18 and (iii) over 18 years. [199942]

Dawn Primarolo: Data on the number of people referred to alcohol counselling services have not been collected centrally, however, the National Drug Treatment Monitoring System has been expanded to include a formal National Alcohol Treatment Monitoring System to collect alcohol treatment data, starting from 1 April 2008.

Drugs: Misuse

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital admissions there were where the primary or secondary diagnosis was drug-related, in each of the last five years, broken down by age of patient. [196842]

Dawn Primarolo: The following table shows the number of finished admission episodes (FAEs) in which the primary or secondary diagnosis of the patient was drug(1) related broken down by age. 2006-07 is the latest period for which figures are available.


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25 Apr 2008 : Column 2384W

25 Apr 2008 : Column 2385W

25 Apr 2008 : Column 2386W
Year (of end of first period of care in patient’s hospital stay)
Age 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03

Under 15

13,976

14,449

14,077

14,612

14,134

15 to 64

162,294

160,065

142,999

131,703

118,119

65+

38,804

37,130

34,002

32,238

28,556

Unknown

373

261

342

405

552

Notes:
FAEs:
A FAE is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.
Data quality:
HES are compiled from data sent by over 300 national health service trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. The Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.
Assessing growth through time:
HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. During the years that these records have been collected the NHS there have been ongoing improvements in quality and coverage. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series.
Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example a number of procedures may now be undertaken in out-patient settings and may no longer be accounted in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time.
All Diagnoses count of episodes—primary and secondary-drug related:
These figures represent a count of all FAEs where the diagnosis was mentioned in any of the 14 (seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in a HES record.
The International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-IO codes used to identify a drug related diagnosis are as follows.
(1)A ‘drug’ can be defined, broadly speaking, as any substance that alters normal bodily function. Therefore, all codes relating to noxious substances and solvents have been included. It is not possible to identify in ICD-10 all diseases caused by drugs (legal or illegal) and there is no way to guarantee, that the admission was drug related. For example, a patient admitted for inguinal hernia surgery may also be dependent on a drug.
F11.- Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of opioids
F12.- Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of cannabinoids
F13.- Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of sedatives or hypnotics
F14.- Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of cocaine
F15.- Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of other stimulants, including caffeine
F16.- Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of hallucinogens
F18.- Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of volatile solvents
F19.- Mental and behavioural disorders due to multiple drug use and use of other psychoactive substances
F55.- Abuse of non-dependence-producing substances
K71.0 Toxic liver disease with cholestasis
K71.1 Toxic liver disease with hepatic necrosis
K71.2 Toxic liver disease with acute hepatitis
K71.3 Toxic liver disease with chronic persistent hepatitis
K71.4 Toxic liver disease with chronic lobular hepatitis
K71.5 Toxic liver disease with chronic active hepatitis
K71.6 Toxic liver disease with hepatitis, not elsewhere classified
K71.7 Toxic liver disease with fibrosis and cirrhosis of liver
K71.8 Toxic liver disease with other disorders of liver
K71.9 Toxic liver disease, unspecified
T36.- Poisoning by systemic antibiotics
T37.- Poisoning by other systemic anti-infectives and antiparasitics
T38.- Poisoning by hormones and their synthetic substitutes and antagonists, not elsewhere classified
T39.- Poisoning by nonopioid analgesics, antipyretics and antirheumatics
T40.- Poisoning by narcotics and psychodysleptics [hallucinogens]
T41.- Poisoning by anaesthetics and therapeutic gases
T42.- Poisoning by antiepileptic, sedative-hypnotic and antiparkinsonism drugs
T43.- Poisoning by psychotropic drugs, not elsewhere classified
T44.- Poisoning by drugs primarily affecting the autonomic nervous system
T45.- Poisoning by primarily systemic and haematological agents, not elsewhere classified
T46.- Poisoning by agents primarily affecting the cardiovascular system
T47.- Poisoning by agents primarily affecting the gastrointestinal system
T48.- Poisoning by agents primarily acting on smooth and skeletal muscles and the respiratory system
T49.- Poisoning by topical agents primarily affecting skin and mucous membrane and by ophthalmological, otorhinolaryngological and dental drugs
T50.- Poisoning by diuretics and other and unspecified drugs, medicaments and biological substances
T52.- Toxic effect of organic solvents
T53.- Toxic effect of halogen derivatives of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons
T54.- Toxic effect of corrosive substances
T55.- Toxic effect of soaps and detergents
T56.- Toxic effect of metals
T57.- Toxic effect of other inorganic substances
T58.- Toxic effect of carbon monoxide
T59.- Toxic effect of other gases, fumes and vapours
T60,- Toxic effect of pesticides
T61.- Toxic effect of noxious substances eaten as seafood
T62.- Toxic effect of other noxious substances eaten as food
T63.- Toxic effect of contact with venomous animals
T64.- Toxic effect of aflatoxin and other mycotoxin food contaminants
T65.- Toxic effect of other and unspecified substances
X40.- Accidental poisoning by and exposure to nonopioid analgesics, antipyretics and antirheumatics
X41.- Accidental poisoning by and exposure to antiepileptic, sedative-hypnotic, antiparkinsonism and psychotropic drugs, not elsewhere classified
X42.- Accidental poisoning by and exposure to narcotics and psychodysleptics [hallucinogens], not elsewhere classified
X43.- Accidental poisoning by and exposure to other drugs acting on the autonomic nervous system
X44.- Accidental poisoning by and exposure to other and unspecified drugs, medicaments and biological substances
X46.- Accidental poisoning by and exposure to organic solvents and halogenated hydrocarbons and their vapours
X47.- Accidental poisoning by and exposure to other gases and vapours
X48.- Accidental poisoning by and exposure to pesticides
X49.- Accidental poisoning by and exposure to other and unspecified chemicals and noxious substances
X60.- Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to nonopioid analgesics, antipyretics and antirheumatics
X61.- Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to antiepileptic, sedative-hypnotic, antiparkinsonism and psychotropic drugs, not elsewhere classified
X62.- Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to narcotics and psychodysleptics [hallucinogens], not elsewhere classified
X63.- Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to other drugs acting on the autonomic nervous system
X64.- Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to other and unspecified drugs, medicaments and biological substances
X66.- Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to organic solvents and halogenated hydrocarbons and their vapours
X67.- Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to other gases and vapours
X68.- Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to pesticides
X69.- Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to other and unspecified chemicals and noxious substances
Y40.- Systemic antibiotics
Y41.- Other systemic anti-infectives and antiparasitics
Y42.- Hormones and their synthetic substitutes and antagonists, not elsewhere classified
Y43.- Primarily systemic agents
Y44.- Agents primarily affecting blood constituents
Y45.- Analgesics, antipyretics and anti-inflammatory drugs
Y46.- Antiepileptic and antiparkinsonism drugs
Y47.- Sedatives, hypnotics and antianxiety drugs
Y48.- Anaesthetics and therapeutic gases
Y49.- Psychotropic drugs, not elsewhere classified
Y50.- Central nervous system stimulants, not elsewhere classified
Y51.- Drugs primarily affecting the autonomic nervous system
Y52.- Agents primarily affecting the cardiovascular system
Y53.- Agents primarily affecting the gastrointestinal system
Y54.- Agents primarily affecting water-balance and mineral and uric acid metabolism
Y55.- Agents primarily acting on smooth and skeletal muscles and the respiratory system
Y56.- Topical agents primarily affecting skin and mucous membrane and ophthalmological, otorhinolaryngological and dental drugs
Y57.- Other and unspecified drugs and medicaments
Y58.- Bacterial vaccines
Y59.- Other and specified vaccines and biological substances
T80.0 Air embolism following infusion, transfusion and therapeutic injection
T80.1 Vascular complications following infusion, transfusion and therapeutic injection
T80.2 Infections following infusion, transfusion and therapeutic injection
T80.8 Other complications following infusion, transfusion and therapeutic injection
T80.9 Unspecified complication following infusion, transfusion and therapeutic injection
T88.0 Infection following immunization
T88.1 Other complications following immunization, not elsewhere classified
T88.2 Shock due to anaesthesia
T88.3 Malignant hyperthermia due to anaesthesia
T88.5 Other complications of anaesthesia
T88.6 Anaphylactic shock due to adverse effect of correct drug or medicament properly administered
T88.7 Unspecified adverse effect of drug or medicament
Z71.5 Drug abuse counselling and surveillance
T96.X Sequelae of poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances
T97.X Sequelae of toxic effects of substances chiefly nonmedicinal as to source
Z50.3 Drug rehabilitation
Ungrossed Data:
Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed).
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The Information Centre for health and social care.

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