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30 Apr 2008 : Column 486W—continued


N umber of persons issued with a penalty notice for disorder for the offence Allowing consumption of alcohol by under 18 on relevant premises in England and Wales for the year 2006( 1,2,3,4)
Allowing consumption of alcohol by under 18 on relevant premises

2005

27

2006

14

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis.
(2) Data include the following offence descriptions and corresponding statute:
Allowing consumption of alcohol by a person under 18 on relevant premises. s.50(2) of the Licensing Act 2003
(3) New legislative reference with effect from, 24 November 2005 on implementation of Licensing Act 2003.
4. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts, other agencies, and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
Court proceedings data held by RDS—Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Ministry of Justice

Animal Experiments

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what severity limits distinguish between (a) mild and moderate and (b) moderate and substantial under the Animal (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986; and whether (i) duration and (ii) intensity of suffering are taken into account. [201905]


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Meg Hillier: Mild protocols are those that at worst give rise to slight or transitory minor adverse effects. Substantial protocols are those that may result in a major departure from the animal's usual state of health or well being. Moderate protocols can best be defined as those that fall between mild and substantial.

Severity limits cannot be determined by a single adverse effect. Professional judgment is required to consider and weigh all the expected adverse effects before assessing the appropriate severity limit. The duration and intensity of the suffering are always taken into account. Further details of the criteria used to assign severity limits to regulated procedures are set out in paragraphs 5.40 to 5.49 of the Guidance on the Operation of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 (HC321). Copies of the guidance have been placed in the House Library.

Antisocial Behaviour Orders

Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many and what proportion of people served with (a) antisocial behaviour orders and (b) parental control orders have re-offended within two years since each was introduced. [202099]

Mr. Coaker: Data on re-offending while subject to an (a) antisocial behaviour order (ASBO) and (b) parenting order are not collected centrally.

Antisocial Behaviour: Internet

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much was spent on the website www.respect.gov.uk in each month since its inception; what the budget for the website is for 2008-09; how many staff are employed to maintain the website; and how many unique visitors there were to the website in each month since its inception. [200380]

Mr. Coaker: The antisocial behaviour Respect website www.respect.gov.uk began in October 2006. In 2006-07, the expenditure on the website was £73,000 and in 2007-08 it was £118,000. The 2008-09 budget for the website is currently under review. The website is run on behalf of the Home Office by Broadcasting Support Services (BSS) who employ one member of staff to maintain the content on the website.

The number of unique visitors to the website each month for the period November 2006 to March 2008 is on the following table.


30 Apr 2008 : Column 488W
Monthly breakdown of unique visitors to the Respect Website
Unique visitors

2006

November

23,282

December

18,321

2007

January

31,214

February

32,061

March

35,002

April

32,903

May

41,523

June

34,647

July

31,589

August

30,546

September

32,055

October

33,347

November

33,620

December

23,270

2008

January

29,743

February

29,883

March

31,025


Total unique visitors for November 2006 to March 2008 is 524,031.

Border and Immigration Agency

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many casework files have been lost by the Border and Immigration Agency in each year since 1997. [199011]

Mr. Byrne: The information is not available in the format requested.

Crime: Genetics

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of crimes solved as a result of a DNA sample being on the national DNA database. [181245]

Meg Hillier: It is estimated that over the period April 1998 to March 2007, there have been approximately 240,000 detections in which a DNA match was available and/or played a part in solving the crime. A breakdown of this figure by year is given in the following table. Figures for the 2007-08 financial year are not yet available.

Number of detections in which a DNA match was available or played a part April 1998 to March 2007
Detected crimes in which a DNA match was available Additional detections arising from DNA match( 1) Total detected crimes in which a DNA match was available or played a part

1998-99

6,151

n/a

6,151

1999-00

8,612

n/a

8,612

2000-01

14,785

n/a

14,785

2001-02

15,894

6,509

22,403

2002-03

21,098

12,717

33,815

2003-04

20,489

15,899

36,388

2004-05

19,873

15,732

35,605

2005-06

20,349

19,960

40,309

2006-07

19,949

21,199

41,148

Total

147,200

92,016

239,216

n/a = Not available. (1) Additional detections may result from the original crime with the DNA match due to the identification of further offences through forensic linkage or through admission by the offender. On average, each ‘crime detected in which a DNA match was available’ now results in a further 1.06 crimes being detected.

Crimes of Violence

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many crimes of violence against the person were recorded in Bury St Edmunds constituency in each of the last five years. [202711]


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Mr. Coaker: Statistics are not collected specifically on a constituency basis. The Home Office does publish statistics at Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership (CDRP) area level. The number of offences of violence against the person for each of the last five years by CDRP is available on the Home Office website at:

Also available is a look-up table that identifies which constituencies are associated with CDRPs. In many instances, a CDRP may comprise of more than one constituency. Conversely, some constituencies will come within two or more CDRPs, either wholly or partially. The look-up table is available at:

Copies of both the statistics table and the look-up table are available in the Library.

Cycling

Rob Marris: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether (a) her Department and (b) her Department’s non-departmental public bodies provide (i) tax-free benefits and (ii) other allowances for their staff to purchase bicycles under the Cycle to Work scheme; and if she will make a statement. [197602]

Mr. Byrne: Neither the Department nor its executive non-departmental public bodies (the Independent Police Complaints Commission, the National Policing Improvement Agency, the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner, and the Security Industry Authority) offer a Cycle to Work scheme to their employees.

However, to encourage green commuting, the department does offer an interest free advance for staff purchasing a bicycle, and bicycle safety equipment, for travelling to and from the work place.

This is a tax free benefit in kind and the same tax treatment applies to employees of government departments as to any other employee.

Driving Offences: Fines

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many drivers were fined for speeding in (a) England and Wales and (b) each police force area in each year since 1997; and how much was paid in fines for speeding in each area in each year. [200248]

Mr. Coaker: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 29 November 2007, Official Report, column 666W.

Extradition: Equatorial Guinea

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her policy is on the extradition to Equatorial Guinea of people suspected of the participation in the attempted coup in that country. [198730]

Meg Hillier: As a matter of normal policy and practice, it would not be right to comment on particular events.


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There are no general extradition arrangements in place between the United Kingdom and Equatorial Guinea. Where there are no such arrangements, the Extradition Act 2003 contains certain specific provisions whereby, in appropriate cases, ad hoc international arrangements may be entered into under which the possibility of extradition would then fall to be considered.

Extradition: USA

Mr. Gummer: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been extradited from the UK to the US in the last three years. [200651]

Meg Hillier: For the period 2005 to 2007, a total of 42 people have been extradited from the UK to the US. 14 were extradited in 2005, 19 in 2006 and nine last year.

Mr. Gummer: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been extradited from the UK to the US to face charges for activities which would not be a criminal matter in the UK in the last three years. [200652]

Meg Hillier: None. The 2003 UK-US extradition treaty stipulates that an offence shall be an extradition offence if the conduct on which the offence is based is punishable under the laws of both states by deprivation of liberty for a period of one year or a more severe penalty. This is reflected in our domestic law. This means no-one can be extradited from one jurisdiction to the other for conduct that is not criminalised in both countries.

Immigration: Prisoner Escapes

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) illegal immigrants and (b) failed asylum seekers detained by the police have absconded en route to immigration detention or removal centres in each of the last five years. [199009]

Mr. Byrne: In 2008 to date there has been one abscond en route from a police station to an immigration removal centre. The detainee was a failed asylum seeker.

In 2007 there were three absconds: one illegal entrant, two failed asylum seekers.

In 2006 there was one abscond who was an illegal entrant.

In 2005 there were two absconds, both failed asylum seekers.

Figures prior to 2005 are not available due to a change in escorting contractor.


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