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8 May 2008 : Column 1097W—continued


8 May 2008 : Column 1098W
Table 2: Estimates of numbers and prevalence of 16 to 59 -year-olds who have used any form of cocaine in the last year. 1996 to 2006-07 BC S
Best estimate Lower estimate Higher estimate % of 16 to 24 year olds Statistically significant change 1996 Unweighted base

1996

196

148

259

0.6

-

10,741

1998

382

309

470

1.3

*

9,884

2000

632

547

729

2.0

*

12,771

2001-02

620

551

696

2.0

*

19,973

2002-03

652

588

724

2.1

*

23,357

2003-04

775

705

852

2.5

*

24,197

2004-05

644

585

709

2.0

*

28,206

2005-06

776

712

846

2.4

*

29,631

2006-07

835

767

908

2.6

*

28,975

Notes: 1. The values are derived by adding or subtracting the confidence interval around the 2006-07 sample best estimates. Lower and higher estimates are based on 95 per cent. confidence intervals (calculated using a logit transformation where proportions were less than 0.2 or greater than 0.8). 2. The figures are calculated using population estimates provided by the Government Actuary's Department.

Reoffenders

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many persistent and prolific offenders have been identified in each police force area in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [200479]

Mr. Coaker: Data from the performance management arrangements for the Prolific and other Priority Offender programme provides the number of such offenders identified through partnership arrangements in each police force area. The data are provided in the following table. The data cover the three years from January 2005 up to December 2007, and are the most recent data available. These figures rely on the accuracy and completeness of the data provided locally by prolific and priority offender schemes.


8 May 2008 : Column 1099W

8 May 2008 : Column 1100W
Table 1
Police force area 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2005 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2006 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2007

Avon and Somerset

218

225

228

Bedfordshire

116

118

122

Cambridgeshire

92

107

135

Cheshire

180

185

191

City of London

4

11

15

Cleveland

132

145

144

Cumbria

67

68

69

Derbyshire

355

359

357

Devon and Cornwall

359

334

334

Dorset

52

75

62

Durham

57

58

79

Dyfed Powys

92

81

84

Essex

195

167

194

Gloucestershire

100

104

112

Greater Manchester

737

840

1,004

Gwent

77

81

90

Hampshire

210

258

333

Hertfordshire

228

149

142

Humberside

181

212

234

Kent

306

254

278

Lancashire

413

361

427

Leicestershire

338

341

342

Lincolnshire

125

111

195

Merseyside

412

417

336

Metropolitan police

1,090

1,139

1,185

Norfolk

118

93

112

North Wales

136

100

120

North Yorkshire

55

89

122

Northamptonshire

183

259

265

Northumbria

224

219

241

Nottinghamshire

501

497

634

South Wales

186

195

237

South Yorkshire

240

237

265

Staffordshire

157

261

239

Suffolk

160

170

145

Surrey

138

181

149

Sussex

311

309

350

Thames Valley

327

334

330

Warwickshire

71

78

107

West Mercia

154

117

117

West Midlands

708

758

788

West Yorkshire

283

242

243

Wiltshire

80

78

48


Shares: Sales Methods

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what guidance has been provided to police forces in England and Wales on dealing with fraud associated with boiler room operations. [204154]

Mr. Coaker: The Government have not issued specific guidance to police forces on dealing with boiler room fraud but aim to deliver a multi-agency response to major frauds including boiler-room frauds. Law enforcement agencies, Government Departments and regulators have already worked together on several initiatives and the City of London Police has established Operation Archway, a national intelligence reporting system for boiler room fraud.

Action against boiler rooms will be strengthened further by the creation of the National Fraud Strategic Authority, which will co-ordinate national counter-fraud efforts. In parallel, the creation of a National Fraud Reporting Centre will boost the ability of law enforcement agencies to take intelligence-led action against complex fraud networks, such as those responsible for boiler rooms.

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were (a) arrested and (b) convicted for offences relating to fraud by boiler room operations in 2007. [204157]

Mr. Coaker: The arrests collection undertaken by the Ministry of Justice provides data on persons arrested for recorded crime (notifiable offences), by age group, gender, ethnicity, and main offence group, i.e. robbery, burglary, fraud and forgery etc. From data reported centrally we are not able to identify specific offences of fraud from within the main ‘fraud and forgery’ offence group.

Similarly, the data held centrally by the Ministry of Justice on the court proceedings database does not contain information about the circumstances behind each case. As a result offences of fraud by boiler room operations cannot be separately identified from other offences under section 1 of the Fraud Act 2006.


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