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8 May 2008 : Column 1134W—continued

Children, Schools and Families

Children in Care: General Certificate of Secondary Education

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many and what percentage of eligible children in care were not entered for any GCSE in each of the last 10 years; [203591]

(2) how many and what percentage of eligible children in care did not achieve five A* to C grades at GCSE including English and mathematics in each of the last 10 years; [203592]


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(3) how many and what percentage of eligible children in care were not entered for an English, mathematics, science or foreign language GCSE in each year since 1997. [203594]

Jim Knight: The national data collections on the educational outcomes for looked-after children were
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introduced in 2000. Data collected since 2000 and published in “Outcome Indicators for Looked After Children Twelve months to 30 September”, show the GCSE performance or equivalents of children who were looked after for at least 12 months. The available information for England is shown in the table.

GCSE performance or equivalents of children who are looked after continuously for at least 12 months in year 11( 1) , 12 months ending 30 September 2000 to 2007, England
Sat at least one GCSE or GNVQ One GCSE at grade A* to G or a GNVQ Five A* to C GCSE grades (or equivalent) Five A* to G GCSE grades (or equivalent)
Number Percentage( 2) Number Percentage( 2) Number Percentage( 2) Number Percentage( 2)

2000

2,100

53.5

1,900

49.2

300

7.3

1,400

35.5

2001

2,200

54.1

2,100

49.6

330

8.0

1,400

33.1

2002

2,500

57.9

2,300

53.2

320

7.5

1,500

36.3

2003

2,600

56.8

2,400

52.9

400

8.7

1,700

36.8

2004

2,900

59.1

2,700

56.1

450

9.4

1,900

39.4

2005

3,000

64.0

2,900

60.2

510

10.8

1,900

40.7

2006

3,300

65.6

3,200

63.2

600

11.8

2,100

41.4

2007

3,400

67.7

3,200

63.7

640

12.6

2,200

43.1

(1) Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10 if under 1,000, and to the nearest 100 if over 1,000.
(2) Expressed as a percentage of all looked-after children in year 11.
Source:
OC2 Survey.

Although we do not collect figures on the number of children looked after who were entered for a GCSE, we do have information on the number who sat at least one GCSE/GNVQ. This is shown in the table.

We do not collect information about the number of looked-after children who achieve GCSE grades in individual subjects. However, these data are available at a local level enabling local authorities to set targets for the attainment of looked-after children at key stage 4 which include English and mathematics. These targets are negotiated with the National Strategies and Government offices and form a statutory part of a local authority’s local area agreement.

Since 1997, there has been an unprecedented focus at national and local level on improving outcomes for looked-after children. Over a five-year period from 1998, the Government invested £885 million through the Quality Protects initiative and a further £113 million through their Choice Protects funding. Looked-after children often have highly complex needs and improving their outcomes is a top Government priority.

In-spite of improvements, outcomes are nowhere near good enough. That is why we are now building on the Care Standards Act 2002, which introduced National Minimum Standards for children’s services, and the Children (Leaving Care) Act 2000, which for the first time provided a legislative framework to support care leavers make the transition to adulthood. We have made nearly £300 million extra available to deliver “Care Matters: Time for Change” and the implementation plan “Care Matters: Time to deliver for children in care”, including the introduction of a personal education allowance for all looked-after children who are at risk of not reaching the expected national standards of attainment. Through the Children and Young Persons Bill, currently before Parliament, we intend to require all schools to have a designated teacher to champion the needs of looked-after children and to ensure that local authorities do everything possible to avoid disrupting their education and training.

Children: Day Care

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what recent estimate he has made of the proportion of nursery children who travel to and from nursery (a) by car, (b) by public transport, (c) on foot and (d) by bicycle. [200559]

Jim Knight: The Department does not hold complete data relating to mode of travel to school. Provision of this information is only compulsory for those schools with an approved Travel Plan. The scope of collection includes: maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools, city technology colleges, academies and special schools.

In the spring 2007 School Census, mode of travel data was supplied for almost 70 per cent. of pupils. The available information relating to nursery pupils is provided in the following table.


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LA maintained nursery and primary schools( 1) : nursery pupils by mode of travel( 2,3) , as at January 2007, England
Nursery pupils( 2)
Number Percentage

Walk

135,390

42.2

Cycle

900

0.3

Car/van

61,550

19.2

Car share

3,960

1.2

Public service bus

3,010

0.9

Dedicated school bus

370

0.1

Bus (type not known)

980

0.3

Taxi

610

0.2

Train

70

0.0

London underground

20

0.0

Metro/tram/light rail

50

0.0

Boarding pupil—not applicable

0

0.0

Other

1,120

0.4

Mode of travel—not collected

112,540

35.1

Total

320,550

100.0

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed.
(2) Includes all pupils in maintained nursery schools and pupils in maintained primary schools whose national curriculum year group is nursery. Includes pupils with sole and dual (main) registration.
(3) Where a pupil uses more than one mode of travel for each journey to school, the longest element of the journey by distance should be recorded.
Note:
Pupil numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.
Source:
School Census

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many child care staff left the profession within (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four and (e) five years of entering the profession in the latest period for which figures are available. [204159]

Beverley Hughes: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Children's Centres

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of the number of children's centres to be located in the super output areas ranked in the (a) first to third, (b) fourth to seventh and (c) eighth to tenth deciles of deprivation by 2010. [204177]

Beverley Hughes: Local authorities are responsible for the planning and delivery of Sure Start children's centres. There are currently 2,906 designated centres. On average we expect children's centres to offer services to around 800 children under five and their families so in practice one children's centre will serve a number of Super Output Areas (SOAs), as well as the SOA in which it is located. From the information provided by local authorities to our delivery partner, Together for Children (TfC), our current estimate is that around two-thirds of designated centres predominantly serve children and families living in the 30 per cent. most disadvantaged SOAs. The remaining centres predominantly serve children and families living outside of the 30 per cent. most disadvantaged SOAs.

Local authorities, supported by TfC, are currently planning the final phase of delivery of the children's centre programme, so that by 2010 there will be 3,500 centres nationally, one for every community. As part of the planning process local authorities are reviewing the reach areas of existing centres to ensure that by 2010 all under fives and their families have access to a children's centre; that the range and intensity of services in each centre reflects the needs of the local community; and that resources continue to be focused on the most disadvantaged areas.

Citizenship: Teachers

John Cummings: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many teachers of citizenship there were in secondary schools in Easington constituency at the most recent date for which figures are available; and what estimate he has made of the average number of hours each week of citizenship teaching which took place in each school in the constituency in the last 12 month. [203786]


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Jim Knight: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Information is available for the number of teachers teaching citizenship for England overall from the Secondary Schools Curriculum Staffing Survey (SSCSS) which is an occasional sample survey last conducted in 2002 and 2007. 2007 figures will be published on 29 May 2008. The 2002 survey showed that there were 9,000 teachers in secondary schools teaching citizenship.

Departmental Telephone Services

Julia Goldsworthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what (a) 0800, (b) 0845 and (c) 0870 telephone numbers for the public are in use by (i) his Department and (ii) agencies which report to his Department. [200120]

Kevin Brennan: The information as requested is not readily available centrally within the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF). To respond fully would involve an extensive internal and external information collection exercise which would exceed the recommended disproportionate cost threshold. DCSF does not keep central telephony records for its arms length bodies, However, to be helpful, the following information, relating solely to DCSF headquarters, can be provided.

DCSF currently employs a total of 24 non-geographic telephone numbers. These can be categorised broadly into two groups: those for use by citizens; and those for use internally by DCSF staff.

Services used by citizens and accessed by customers calling non-geographic telephone numbers are shown in the following table.


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Helpline Number Information/help provided

Headship Information Line

0845 716 5136

Information in connection with national headship training programmes

EDUBASE

0870 120 2527

Provision of schools data to the public

Sexwise Helpline

0800 28 29 30

For under 18s—answers queries on sex and relationships

Office of the Schools Adjudicator

0870 001 2468

Schools Adjudication service

Education Maintenance Allowance

0800 056 2811

Helpline for organisations involved in delivering EMA

Young Minds

0800 018 2138

For parents concerned about the mental health of a baby, young person

One Parent Families

0800 018 5026

Support for lone parents

Family Rights Group

0800 731 1696

Support for families whose children are involved with social services

DCSF Main Switchboard officials

0870 001 2345

Service to route callers to DCSF

DCSF Public Inquiry Line

0870 000 2288

General information line for all DCSF related inquiries

Prolog

0845 602 2260

DCSF publications helpline

Families need Fathers

0870 760 7496

Help parents to retain, develop and make best use of children's relationship's

Fast Track Helpline

0845 601 5921

Queries from fast track teachers and head teachers

Fast Track recruitment helpline

0845 058 1066

Teachers applying to join the Fast Track Teaching programme

Teacher information line

0845 600 0991

Advice on training opportunities and support available

Return to teach line

0845 600 0993

Advice on training opportunities and support available

National Strategies Helpdesk

0845 850 1444

To support the delivery of the national strategies


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