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14 May 2008 : Column 1653W—continued

MRSA

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what estimate his Department has made of the percentage changes in incidence of (a) MRSA and (b) clostridium difficile as a result of the deep cleaning programme; and over what timescale his Department expects such changes to be reflected in hospital infection statistics; [203400]

(2) by what means his Department will assess the effectiveness of its deep cleaning programme for hospitals in England in reducing cases of healthcare associated infections. [203403]

Ann Keen: As set out by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State in his written ministerial statement on 17 January 2008, Official Report, columns 38-39WS, following completion of the deep clean of the national health service on 31 March 2008, the Department will work with strategic health authorities (SHAs) to draw up examples of where a deep clean has had a demonstrable effect in improving patient care and experience and will share these across the NHS.

SHAs will take the lead on evaluation locally as the impact of each trust’s programme will be different and no single measurement method will pick up all the benefits, particularly as trusts may be implementing a range of measures to improve cleanliness and tackle healthcare associated infections.

Improvements to patient experience and environment may be measurable through:

Deep cleaning is just part of a comprehensive range of measures to improve cleanliness and tackle infections set out in the Strategy “Clean, Safe Care: Reducing Infections and Saving Lives”. Copies of the Strategy are available in the Library.

NHS: Crimes of Violence

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) violent incidents against NHS staff, (b) physical assaults against NHS staff and (c) criminal sanctions against individuals who had assaulted NHS staff there were in each of the last five financial years in (i) each NHS hospital trust, (ii) each strategic health authority area and (iii) England. [203450]

Ann Keen: Since 2004-05 the NHS Security Management Service (NHS SMS) has collected information on the number of physical assaults reported against National Health Service staff in England and on the numbers of criminal sanctions following assaults.


14 May 2008 : Column 1654W

Information is not available by the category of violent incidents or on reported physical assaults by strategic health authority area. The numbers of reported physical assaults in England are shown in the following table

Number

2004-05

60,385

2005-06

58,695

2006-07

55,709


Tables showing the number physical assaults reported by each health body have been placed in the Library.

Information on criminal sanctions following assaults is not available for each NHS hospital trust or strategic health authority area. The numbers of criminal sanctions following assaults against NHS staff in England are shown in the following table.

Number

2004-05

759

2005-06

850

2006-07

869


Criminal sanctions include:

NHS: Working Hours

Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he discussed the implementation of the Working Time Directive in the health sector at his recent meeting with the French Minister of Health; and if he will make a statement. [202825]

Dawn Primarolo: At the meeting between my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State and Roselyne Bachelot, French Minister for Health and Social Affairs on 14 April, the issue of European working time directive was not discussed. However, at the Informal Meeting of European Union Health Ministers in Slovenia on 17 and 18 April, concerns were raised about the challenges facing health services from the European working time directive.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which team in his Department leads on the implementation of the Working Time Directive in the NHS in England. [203446]

Ann Keen: Local national health service trusts are responsible for implementing the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) as part of their health and safety obligations. The Department has commissioned NHS National Workforce Projects to support local NHS implementation of the EWTD for doctors in training through a range of innovative pilot projects and supporting tools.


14 May 2008 : Column 1655W

Nurses: Students

Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much funding was allocated to returning to (a) nursing and (b) midwifery courses in each of the last five years. [202847]

Ann Keen: In 2004-05 £4.3 million was set aside and £2 million in 2005-06 to fund return to practice initiatives for all healthcare professionals, some of which would have been used for nursing and midwifery courses. From 2006-07 onwards, money for such schemes has been baselined into the multi professional education and training budget and cannot be disaggregated. The earliest year for which information is available is 2004-05.

Psychiatry

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what representations he has received from the Health Professions Council Professional Liaison Group on the status of the humanistic tradition in the field of psychotherapy. [202937]

Mr. Bradshaw: The Secretary of State has received no representations from the Health Professions Council Professional Liaison Group on the status of the humanistic tradition in the field of psychotherapy, as the group is yet to be established.

Departmental Travel

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much was spent by his Department on first class train tickets in the last 12 months. [171260]

Mr. Bradshaw: The Department's total spend on first class train tickets in the last 12 months has been as follows:

Amount (£)

June 2006

431,475.40

May 2006

442,054.15

April 2006

383,889.08

July 2006 to March 2007

545,688.00

Total

1,803,106.63


These figures consist of rail travel booked via the Department's contracted agent. There are some exceptional cases where travel is booked outside of the contract but these cannot be identified separately without incurring disproportionate costs.

All travel within the Department is undertaken in accordance with the Civil Service Management Code and the Ministerial Code.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Stephen Hesford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people between the ages of 16 and 25 were treated for a sexually transmitted disease in the last year for which figures are available. [201623]


14 May 2008 : Column 1656W

Dawn Primarolo: The number of selected sexually transmitted infections diagnosed in 16 to 24-year-olds in genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in England, by age group in 2006 are shown in the following table:

Age g roup
Sexually Transmitted Infection 16-19 20-24

Uncomplicated chlamydial infection

25,658

38,792

Uncomplicated gonorrhoea infection

3,348

4,934

Primary and Secondary infectious syphilis

100

329

Anogenital herpes simplex—first attack

3,017

5,369

Anogenital warts—first attack

13,973

24,632

Notes:
1. The data available from the KC60 statutory returns are for diagnoses made in GUM clinics only. Diagnoses made in other clinical settings, such as General Practice, are not recorded in the KC60 dataset.
2. The data available from the KC60 statutory returns are the number of diagnoses made, not the number of patients diagnosed. Individual patients may have more than one diagnosis in a year.
3. The information provided has been adjusted for missing clinic data.
4. Data are not yet available for 2007.
5. Aggregated data are collected in a predefined format and age group can be presented in the above categories.
Source:
Health Protection Agency, KC60 returns

In addition to diagnoses made in GUM clinics, the National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP) provides screening to asymptomatic people aged under 25 years in England. The following table shows the number of positive chlamydia screens among those aged 16-24 years who were screened for chlamydia as part of the NCSP during the period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007.

Age group (years)
16-19 20-24

Numbers positive

8,467

6,599

Note:
The data from the NCSP Core Dataset are for positive chlamydia screens made outside of GUM clinics only and include positive screens made by the Boots pathfinder project.
Source:
The NCSP Core Dataset.

Tuberculosis: Drug Resistance

Nick Herbert: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many cases of (a) multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and (b) extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were diagnosed in each health authority in each of the last 10 years; what the treatment outcome in each case was; and what proportion of those cases were attributed to previously unsuccessful tuberculosis treatment. [203469]

Dawn Primarolo: The following table shows the number of cases of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) in patients reported to the national surveillance system (enhanced tuberculosis surveillance (ETS)) from 1998 to 2006 in England. Numbers smaller than five are not provided because of the risk of deductive disclosure.


14 May 2008 : Column 1657W
Number of cases of multi-drug resistant( 1) TB by region, England, 1998 to 2006( 2)
1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

East Midlands

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

East of England

<5

<5

<5

<5

5

<5

<5

<5

<5

London

14

11

10

12

16

33

21

16

30

North East

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

North West

<5

<5

5

<5

<5

<5

<5

6

<5

South East

<5

<5

<5

<5

7

<5

<5

<5

5

South West

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

West Midlands

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

Yorkshire and the Humber

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

9

6

5

(1) Resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin, with or without resistance to other drugs.
(2) Region is equivalent to strategic health authority (SHA) in all places except the South East, which includes South Central and South East Coast SHAs.

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